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Old 07-26-2011, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Texas
43,409 posts, read 52,403,598 times
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Same as with people. Tramadol works with some and not with others.
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Old 08-03-2011, 03:51 PM
 
1,078 posts, read 2,281,297 times
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Our Springer hurt her hip and was given Tramadol by the vet. It made her so loopy I had to question the dosage. Glad I only had to give it to her once.
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Old 08-05-2011, 03:26 PM
 
501 posts, read 1,105,944 times
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I'd let the vet know right away, because there are other things you can use for pain.

My old dog had bone cancer, and tramadol helped to a point; however if he was at the higher dosage in the range he would pant, get restless and agitated (instead of sedated, as is more typical). The exact opposite of the typical side effect of sedation (but iirc, agitation is on the side effect list).

My girl is currently on tramadol (1-2 every 12 hours) due to multiple tooth extractions. In her case, it makes her sleepy at her higher dosage, which initially was a godsend because she has to stay calm while she heals up. At the lower dosage, it is controlling her pain but otherwise she is completely normal.

Here is a vet tech's blog that I found somewhat useful when I was researching tramadol - it helped me formulate questions to ask my vet. Hope it is of use to you, but seriously, call your vet right away about your dog's behavior on tramadol, and good luck in figuring out what to do for the pain.

Vet Tech: Tramadol (http://vettechs.blogspot.com/2005/04/tramadol.html - broken link)
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Old 08-05-2011, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
553 posts, read 1,102,752 times
Reputation: 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snarky Prof View Post
My 11 year old GSD/Lab, Mac, recently injured his back. The vet prescribed Tramadol for pain. Dosage is 50mg, 3 times a day. I am not seeing much improvement. He still shows signs of pain (pacing, panting, incontinence and behavioral changes).

I am concerned that either he is not on the correct dosage or this just is not the right medication.

Thoughts? I can't stand to see my pup like this.
Update:

Well, as it turns out, Tramadol was not what was causing my dog problems. We learned that he has an inoperable brain tumor.


Long story short, Mac's panting and pacing grew worse. He was staring at walls and not recognizing us. We took him to another vet who ran some test and indicated that Mac's issues were neurological. He referred us to a veterinary neurologist at the veterinary school in our area. The MRI showed a tumor the size of a plum on his brain, along with edema.

The neurologist and the surgeon indicated that the position of the tumor is such that it would be very difficult to extract the whole tumor. There is also the possibility of taking brain matter along with the tumor. There are also some serious risks with surgery.

We considered radiation, but given his age, I am not sure if he would do well with going for treatment four days a week for a month. The life expectancy is 1-2 years, that is, if he tolerates the treatment.

After weighing all of these factors, we have decided that the most humane thing, and least invasive, it to give Mac steroids and chemotherapy drugs and make him as comfortable as possible until he is no longer living a dignified life. I cannot put him through something uncomfortable and painful for him. I want him to enjoy the time he has left. When it is time for him to go to the Bridge, he will let me know.

For now, he is responding to the steriods and the chemo drugs with no adverse effects. He is back to his old self. I know this will be short lived; the neurologist said it could be weeks or months. I am just happy to have him home.
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Old 02-18-2014, 12:09 AM
 
Location: NewZealand
5 posts, read 21,856 times
Reputation: 31
Default My elderly large dog dog is on Tramadol

Stella is a 13 year old great dane mastiff retriever cross much loved by our family. She has had cancer growths cut out in the past but with new growths growing we chose not to operate again.

Yes its was time to come to terms with her mortality!

Signs of your dog dying? - Yahoo Answers

The vet talking clip down the page is really moving and helpful

Yes our doggy is dying of the very common ailment - melanoma cancer spreading throughout her body.

Yes we want Stella last days to be at home - with all that she loves and people her lover her.

Four weeks ago she lay down -not eating, drinking or moving, and in pain. The vet administer morphine.
The outcome - a tale wagging dog wagging its tale wanting to be feed etc!!!

So - the vet prescribed Tramadol, 3 time over 24 hours, four 50 mg capsules a dose! That 200 mg a time for big Stella whose weight had dropped to 43 kg.

First problem is how to get the dose into her! - Stella is wilful, with a very powerful bite huge jaws - l and an expert is avoiding at taking any medicine.

The best method ended up being mixing the powder with cream cheese with a pinch of raw sugar to over come the bitter taste. The paste is pushed into her gums and she licks and swallows it OK.

Next issue - how did she react to the Tramadol? Well for three day she walked into walks and walked in circle, wanting to go in and out often. We were concerned - again ... Well day four she settled down - with a lot more sleeping. The regular walks and good food helped.

Next issue - change in diet! Stella has always had a huge appetite! But her food preferences changes. Yes its a case of cooking up her favour food - slow cooked beef or chicken, with vegetable added for the last hour of cooking. I do add soy sauce to the mix - all packaged up so she has a freezer of frozen meals. She still demands her high quality dry mix.
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Old 02-18-2014, 12:29 AM
 
Location: NewZealand
5 posts, read 21,856 times
Reputation: 31
Default My elder dog is on Tramadol

Tramadol does rate? What worked best?

To start, I checked for pain regularly - lifting her is possible with the pain killer working well. It was a case of a dose ever 5 to 6 hours, higher at night lower during the day. Gradually the following I found the following worked best:
200 mg (4 capsules) at bed time (10.30 pm), 150 mg when I get her up (6.30 am), and again 150 at mid day and when I come home from work at 5 - 6 pm

Next issue - learning how to adapt her toilet habits! Why Because she is sleepy for long periods (on washable covers on a water proof cover).

Stella has always been meticulous in demanding regular outdoor access. So far only one slip up - my fault in not understanding her timing! Its outdoor walk and toilet time after ever Tramadol dose and another 1 or 2 times time at night! That's at least 6 times a day

Stella has always been meticulous in cleaning her self - so its swims, and dog soap washing with towelled rub downs.

She is gradually getting weaker and weaker - but peaks in the afternoon - evening. Drinks and eats well, tail wags, toilet OK, sleep OK. The Vet and I are surprised that she has lasted this long - comfortably.

Yes Tramadol works - and I am constantly check the dose and pain levels.

Our heavy hearts ...!? we have been blessed with a wonderful dog ...
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Old 02-18-2014, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Western NC
729 posts, read 1,214,674 times
Reputation: 1108
I'm not a fan of Tramadol. It was prescribed to my golden who has a deformed and arthritic foot. It upset his stomach and put him off of his food. A friend of mine was giving her golden Tramadol after surgery on his hind leg. That's when we found out that one of the rare side effects is blindness! Thankfully only temporary while he was on the meds.

I found Deramaxx to be more effective when my guy has flare ups. I also give him 1 tbsp of Phyto-flex twice a day. Rabbits On Okunoshima Island Swarm Tourist (VIDEO) He is 73 lbs and a two pound container will last 6 months. I swear it has helped his arthritis. He's been on it for a year and has gone from always having a hitch in his gate with occasional limping to walking and acting like he is pain free. My friend who deals with a lot of senior aged rescues swears by it.
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Old 02-18-2014, 01:32 PM
 
857 posts, read 1,769,169 times
Reputation: 1116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snarky Prof View Post
Update:

Well, as it turns out, Tramadol was not what was causing my dog problems. We learned that he has an inoperable brain tumor.


Long story short, Mac's panting and pacing grew worse. He was staring at walls and not recognizing us. We took him to another vet who ran some test and indicated that Mac's issues were neurological. He referred us to a veterinary neurologist at the veterinary school in our area. The MRI showed a tumor the size of a plum on his brain, along with edema.

The neurologist and the surgeon indicated that the position of the tumor is such that it would be very difficult to extract the whole tumor. There is also the possibility of taking brain matter along with the tumor. There are also some serious risks with surgery.

We considered radiation, but given his age, I am not sure if he would do well with going for treatment four days a week for a month. The life expectancy is 1-2 years, that is, if he tolerates the treatment.

After weighing all of these factors, we have decided that the most humane thing, and least invasive, it to give Mac steroids and chemotherapy drugs and make him as comfortable as possible until he is no longer living a dignified life. I cannot put him through something uncomfortable and painful for him. I want him to enjoy the time he has left. When it is time for him to go to the Bridge, he will let me know.

For now, he is responding to the steriods and the chemo drugs with no adverse effects. He is back to his old self. I know this will be short lived; the neurologist said it could be weeks or months. I am just happy

to have him home.

How wonderful you are working with your boys needs.
So many people would have just put him down.

True LOVE!
Enjoy the time you have left.
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Old 02-19-2014, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Western NC
729 posts, read 1,214,674 times
Reputation: 1108
First of all, I want to apologize for the wrong link in my post above. It was supposed to be a link to Phyto-Flex made by Natures Pharmacy and not a bunch of cute rabbits.

To Snarky Prof - I hadn't seen your post about the brain tumor until I logged in this morning. I am sorry I missed it yesterday before posting. I think you made the right decision. Having golden retrievers means having to deal with cancer. Sad but true. I have had many long discussions with friends and many of us have a cut off age for treating cancers. For me it's age 10. Once they are seniors things like anesthesia and surgery are much harder on our old friends and it's harder for them to recover. Many times they don't. My last golden lived 5 years with mammary cancer. She lived to be 14-15 years old (she was a rescue). I don't regret not treating the cancer as I think it would have diminished her life. We lost our first golden at age 9. We thought of chemo and other treatments but it wouldn't have solved anything. Instead we changed her diet, gave her supplements and treated her holistically. We had her 6 months longer than expected and they were six good months followed by 4 crappy days. Again, no regrets. I always ask myself "when this dog dies, will I have any regrets?" and I try to give them a god life that will leave me with the answer "no, no regrets". If that means sleeping on the floor with my dog to help calm him through the night, that's what I've done. Good luck with Mac. I hope for several more good years and very, very few crappy days.
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Old 02-19-2014, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Colorado
18,788 posts, read 4,920,848 times
Reputation: 5443
The vet gave our peke Tramadol for his back pain, my husband had Tramadol tablets (50mg) and the vet
said we could use those...
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