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Old 09-14-2011, 02:33 PM
 
Location: North Downtown Houston (Northside Village)
157 posts, read 501,272 times
Reputation: 127

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I just adopted a 2nd dog who is 1 year old. She's a VERY hyper westie mix. My other dog, Scout (4-5 years old) is very well behaved. I spent a lot of time teaching her manners, how to sit, stay, not jump, etc.

My problem is: how do i train the second one? I can say "sit" until I"m blue in the face, but the new dog keeps popping back up, while Scout is peacefully sitting, waiting for a treat. I am giving treats to both, but it's very hard to train the second because it takes her so long to get it.

Should I only work with Roxy while Scout is outside? She will hate that, but I don't know of any other way. Roxy is just so excitable. HELP!?
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Old 09-14-2011, 02:57 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 15,373,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hhheights77007 View Post
I just adopted a 2nd dog who is 1 year old. She's a VERY hyper westie mix. My other dog, Scout (4-5 years old) is very well behaved. I spent a lot of time teaching her manners, how to sit, stay, not jump, etc.

My problem is: how do i train the second one? I can say "sit" until I"m blue in the face, but the new dog keeps popping back up, while Scout is peacefully sitting, waiting for a treat.I am giving treats to both, but it's very hard to train the second because it takes her so long to get it.

Should I only work with Roxy while Scout is outside? She will hate that, but I don't know of any other way. Roxy is just so excitable. HELP!?
Well there's one obvious problem! Giving Roxy treats when she's hopping up and down! I play "sucks to be you" with my four dogs. Everyone sits on command. The last one to sit? Sucks to be you, no treat.

A year-old dog still has puppy-brain and isn't going to find it easy to settle, not be competitive for resources, calm down, etc. I think yolu're on the right track with working on her seperately for now....set her up to succeed, not fail.

A well-run obedience class would also for sure be an excellent idea. The primary value in group obedience classes is, your dog learns to focus despite distractions. Which is the hardest part of learning for most dogs.
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Old 09-14-2011, 03:33 PM
 
Location: North Downtown Houston (Northside Village)
157 posts, read 501,272 times
Reputation: 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
Well there's one obvious problem! Giving Roxy treats when she's hopping up and down! I play "sucks to be you" with my four dogs. Everyone sits on command. The last one to sit? Sucks to be you, no treat.
.
Ha! You're right and I didn't even see it until you put it that way.

Both are being crated right now, but when I get home, I let scout (and only scout) out before even looking at Roxy because she's barking a storm. I ignore her until she stops, then when I start heading over to her crate to let her out, she starts up again!

I have a feeling it will "suck to be her" for a long time because you're right, she is still very puppy-like.
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Old 09-14-2011, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
4,715 posts, read 10,192,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
Well there's one obvious problem! Giving Roxy treats when she's hopping up and down! I play "sucks to be you" with my four dogs. Everyone sits on command. The last one to sit? Sucks to be you, no treat.

A year-old dog still has puppy-brain and isn't going to find it easy to settle, not be competitive for resources, calm down, etc. I think yolu're on the right track with working on her seperately for now....set her up to succeed, not fail.

A well-run obedience class would also for sure be an excellent idea. The primary value in group obedience classes is, your dog learns to focus despite distractions. Which is the hardest part of learning for most dogs.

I have never had a name for the game but I play it with my dogs too and use to play it with them and my parents dogs when they were together only the first dog that did what I asked got a treat.Wow it got all of them responding to a commands very fast!

With Chaos ( puppy) I work with her alone and with Dazzle using the game when it is the two of them. Phoenix does not play as being deaf with limited vision she would never be first so she gets her own command and a treat if she does it. But usually she is sleeping some where so doesn't even know we are playing the game.
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Old 09-14-2011, 08:57 PM
 
Location: In the middle...
1,253 posts, read 3,044,415 times
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Teaching Roxy separate for now is the best idea, along with obedience classes would be key. Scout knows what is expected and does it, Roxy needs to learn what is expected and then she will be just as quick to respond to commands.

Every dog is different but Roxy will get it. Rewarding her for not getting it will never help her to get it. I do like that you make her wait in her kennel while she is barking.

Her demanding and you not responding is a good thing. You are already making steps in the right direction!

Let us know how it goes!
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Old 09-15-2011, 08:00 AM
 
3,593 posts, read 10,691,050 times
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A year old dog is sort of like having a young teenager running around in your home. They have some attention span but are still mostly ruled by impulse and energy. Roxy is going to "bounce around" a lot more than Scout (who is more like a 30/40 year old), especially in the excitment of when you get home. Don't reward it but also don't try to correct it with any other method than ignoring. Giving any sort of attention to it is getting the reaction Roxie wants - your attention on her! I always suggest getting some exercise in before training. It doesn't have to be anything major, a little walk or a little time in the yard will help Roxie to focus in a positive way. One on one training is important but an older well trained dog is an asset and can be used as a tool in training a youngster. Dogs are great at picking up cues and behavours from other dogs. With a little time, Roxie will see that Scout gets good things when he does "XYZ". It will click in Roxie's brain to also try doing "XYZ" to see if good things come her way too. Obviously praise those efforts enormously! Hope this helps.

Oh and please post some pictures....we love pictures!
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Old 09-15-2011, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
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I would also suggest that training not just be a set time but all day when you are with them. Chaos learned "wait" at meal times as I make her sit tell her to wait and put the bowl of food down and tell her wait again. She is a major chow hound so for her to sit and wait is really a task but she has gotten very good at it and will not touch the food until I give her her release word. I use "free" as "ok" is just said too often in normal conversation. Everyday I would lengthen the time a bit so now she was a very solid long wait. I use it in the car too when I open the hatch all three are on a wait and then one by one I release them, Phoenix is the most difficult as she is on hand signals and touch commands being deaf and vision limited.

I do downs and sits often like on walks it keeps them thinking and is great mental stimulation on walks once they know tricks I start asking for those during walks too and they come home tired. Having had herding breeds I learned mental stimulation is just as important as physical exercise. When I use to play ball with Jazz it was quite a show as people would stop and watch as she had to work for every toss of the ball and I would do things like put her on a wait toss the ball release her then half way to the ball ask her for a down, toss in a roll over or spin then release her to get the ball, the combos are endless and she had so much more fun then she had if somene just tossed a ball and it kept her quick on commands Dash was usually right by my side as he did not play fetch but he would be doing what ever command I gave Jazz and people would be laughing at him and for some strange reason he LOVED to make people laugh. We were quite the entrertainment for people walking in the park!

People asked how many hours a day I trained and it is hard to answer as once she knew something it was just added to her play or walks and the actual teaching took little time as she was one smart dog ( cattle dogX border collie) . Dash and Phoenix learned alot of things such a tricks just by watching Jazz.


If I am doing say laundry and one or more folllow me I then ask for a down stay and they lay down and watch me. Anyway you can make training a lot of fun for you and your dog and making them work to get something makes it so easy...The nothing in life is free approach.

When you do plan a training session having a hungry dog helps there as then they are more willing to work for that treat unless you have a true chow hound like Chaos and my late Dash.They were both so food driven it dd not make a difference. Don't make dog training a chore but rather have fun with the training!
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Old 09-15-2011, 03:17 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 15,373,682 times
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Dashdog's got a good point...make it part of day-to-day activities. Want food? Sit and wait for release. Want that toy thrown? Sit/do something/use self-control in order to get it thrown. Want in or out of the vehicle? Wait for permission. Want to be petted? All four paws on the ground, no attention if you're jumping around like a mad thing. Etc.

Self-control isn't a natural dog trait really, but it is something they need to learn in order to live nicely with humans.
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Old 09-19-2011, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Texas
43,564 posts, read 52,710,219 times
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It's tougher with the second dog, I agree!!

On the one hand, your good older dog can help with manners, etc.

But you really do have to get the second dog out and alone and take them to their own classes, etc.
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