U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-02-2013, 08:54 AM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,515,243 times
Reputation: 4246

Advertisements

I have no knowledge of spindle cell cancer, but I just wanted to say, "Ohhhhh Dustyyyyy -- you have one gorgeous face!" I so hope you are able to get him over this. He looks like a fantastic buddy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-03-2013, 04:17 PM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,153 posts, read 17,340,688 times
Reputation: 5017
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
I have no knowledge of spindle cell cancer, but I just wanted to say, "Ohhhhh Dustyyyyy -- you have one gorgeous face!" I so hope you are able to get him over this. He looks like a fantastic buddy.
Thank you so much, TinaMcG! He is a fantastic buddy! Sadly, there is no cure. He already has years on him that are considered "old" for a lab but good news is that the cancer is encapsulated and well contained on his stifle. It has not spread to other systems. All we are doing is keeping him happy and comfortable. He is in no pain, the vet confirmed this in a thorough exam. He wags his tail 24/7 (almost, except when he's sleeping ) and behaves like an overgrown puppy. He is one happy, submissive, loving dog to all people and all other pets, whether ours or somebody else's. We love him and will miss him when he goes to the rainbow bridge. Maybe he can get one more summer basking in the warmth of the sun, catch a few more tennis balls, and get lots more tummy rubs before he goes on. It's been just over a year since the diagnosis, and he's doing so well it's hard to believe it.

My heart goes out to anyone who has illness and disease in a pet, be it cancer or something else. We all love our pets as members of the family -- sometimes more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2013, 04:48 PM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,515,243 times
Reputation: 4246
We didn't find out that our Jimmy had cancer until the day we had to let him go. It was two days after last Christmas, and he was 14 years old. He was our heart dog, the best we could ever hope for, and he was my husband's first dog. We had been taking him to physical therapy and giving him a mountain of supplements and pain meds for what the vets had all said was severe arthritis. He also had a bad gum disease that required many of his teeth to come out, and we were thinking we might do that after the holidays, though I was just dreading putting him through that.

So on that morning, we took him in for radiographs. His breathing had become so labored and his back legs were really giving out. I knew something was up. I had fallen asleep with him next to me the night before in a puddle of tears, holding his beautiful golden front paw. The radiograph showed more than arthritis. It showed cancer in his lower spine. So that was that, and all I can say is, I am so grateful my husband was there and we mustered up the strength to hold him as he left us. It was a strangely beautiful and peaceful couple of minutes, and we talked to him the whole time.

As Jimmy was being sedated, I said to him, "Jim, you're going to see Hallie! Wanna see Hallie?" She was our other beloved dog who we had lost just two months earlier at 13 years after a week in ICU. Well, hearing her name made his eyes light up! He was so sick, so near the end, and hearing Hallie's name sparked a look of alertness and recognition in him and I will never forget it.

Dusty know so well how committed to him you are. But having lost two in the span of two months, I am able to say that the grief really is a small price to pay for the immeasurable love and joy they bring us for so many years. Be grateful for every second you have withhim, and God bless.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-04-2013, 02:29 PM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,153 posts, read 17,340,688 times
Reputation: 5017
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
We didn't find out that our Jimmy had cancer until the day we had to let him go. It was two days after last Christmas, and he was 14 years old. He was our heart dog, the best we could ever hope for, and he was my husband's first dog. We had been taking him to physical therapy and giving him a mountain of supplements and pain meds for what the vets had all said was severe arthritis. He also had a bad gum disease that required many of his teeth to come out, and we were thinking we might do that after the holidays, though I was just dreading putting him through that.

So on that morning, we took him in for radiographs. His breathing had become so labored and his back legs were really giving out. I knew something was up. I had fallen asleep with him next to me the night before in a puddle of tears, holding his beautiful golden front paw. The radiograph showed more than arthritis. It showed cancer in his lower spine. So that was that, and all I can say is, I am so grateful my husband was there and we mustered up the strength to hold him as he left us. It was a strangely beautiful and peaceful couple of minutes, and we talked to him the whole time.

As Jimmy was being sedated, I said to him, "Jim, you're going to see Hallie! Wanna see Hallie?" She was our other beloved dog who we had lost just two months earlier at 13 years after a week in ICU. Well, hearing her name made his eyes light up! He was so sick, so near the end, and hearing Hallie's name sparked a look of alertness and recognition in him and I will never forget it.

Dusty know so well how committed to him you are. But having lost two in the span of two months, I am able to say that the grief really is a small price to pay for the immeasurable love and joy they bring us for so many years. Be grateful for every second you have withhim, and God bless.

Your post leaves me more than misty-eyed. I'm so sorry for your loss. Jim remembered Hallie. They do remember, for a long time. They even mourn, much the way we do for them. I read the words and feel the love, and the grief that you went through. You were so caring and loving. I wish all animals had a home like yours.
I'm sorry it was such a sudden shock to you. That must have made it ever so much more difficult, if that were possible. Sometimes I tend to think that it's a blessing to have some time to get used to the idea of letting a beloved dog go, but it really isn't any easier. There's no way to get used to it. Again, thank you for your lovely post. My tear ducts needed the cleansing.

You are right, though, it is a small price to pay for the unconditional love they give us. Those who have never had dogs do not know what they have missed. It adds a very special dimension to our lives, a gift from above.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-04-2013, 04:07 PM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,515,243 times
Reputation: 4246
Has anyone here looked into what has been called the "cancer starving diet"? It's usually raw and grain-free, as cancer cells have been found to thrive on the glucose produced from metabolizing carbohydrates. I even have a friend recovering from breast cancer who has gone on a grain-free diet.

I wish all of you well in your battles. Cancer just seems to be so epidemic in dogs these days.

Animal Health Issues: Cancer
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-04-2013, 05:29 PM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,153 posts, read 17,340,688 times
Reputation: 5017
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
Has anyone here looked into what has been called the "cancer starving diet"? It's usually raw and grain-free, as cancer cells have been found to thrive on the glucose produced from metabolizing carbohydrates. I even have a friend recovering from breast cancer who has gone on a grain-free diet.

I wish all of you well in your battles. Cancer just seems to be so epidemic in dogs these days.

Animal Health Issues: Cancer
Our holistic treatment for Dusty is basically that - grain free, good quality protein (fish, beef). We don't feed poultry because it is high on the inflammation scale and I go by the extensive listing of inflammation ratings in "The Inflammation Free Diet Plan" by Monica Reinagel. I have found this to be an invaluable handbook, since inflammation of cells is really the source of all disease, and I believe in using natural anti-inflammatories in the way of foods for chronic pain as well. The book was highly recommended to us by our holistic vet.

Carbs feed the cancer. I don't know all that much about it but it would make sense that if this is true in canines, then it would be true in humans as well.

We humans do love carbs, though -- and there's no doubt that we consume way too many! Your friend is probably smart to cut out grains, at least for a while and under the guidance of her doctor, to see how she feels.

I think cancers being "epidemic" in dogs (and cats, too) is related to what they eat, the toxins they are expose to via heartworm and flea meds, and over-vaccination!! I'm convinced of it.

Thank you for that excellent link.

Last edited by southward bound; 02-04-2013 at 05:57 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2013, 10:54 AM
 
2 posts, read 49,485 times
Reputation: 24
I just started reading Pukka's Promise, by Ted Kerasote. Found it in my research for why cancers claims so many dog's lives.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2013, 11:05 PM
 
1 posts, read 5,406 times
Reputation: 15
Wishing you well with your sweet Lab. I hope that your baby is still going strong. Please know that my heart goes to you, your baby and your family.

I have an 11 year old Golden Retriever who has also been lumpy and bumpy her whole life, all benign. And now has a 2"x2" tumor ~ hard and bumpy slightly under her left armpit that came out of nowhere.
The needle biopsy (which was difficult to get, due to, crunchy and hard substance)
came back "no significant signs of malignancy" however, my doctor does not like it and would like to remove it. He says it has like a stem connected to the muscle so he would have to large margins around it and would still not be able to cut all of it out.
He is still skeptical of this tumor and is unsure of the cancer possibilities. He has offered to cut a chunk out for a better biopsy, But I am afraid of it spreading if it is cancer. What should I do???? I keep going back and forth with this question. She loves to swim and loves to play. We have several Golden's but she is my number one.
My Vet is also practices Holistic and Conventional Medicine.. ]

Again, my support to you for your baby Labrador.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-10-2013, 08:50 PM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,153 posts, read 17,340,688 times
Reputation: 5017
LB's, We had a similar decision to make with our lab due to age. But, they did a biopsy and were able to identify the cells. In our case, we were told this type of cancer is slow growing, and they said the same thing about needing to making large margins (that is standard protocol) and not being able to get it all. We eventually opted for palliative, holistic care and no surgery and are very pleased with the choice.

It's a difficult decision to make and I wish you well as you seek to make the right decision for you and your Golden. It's more difficult for you because you don't know definitively what kind of tumor it is, or if it's even malignant. I hope you can find out for sure. It might turn out to be benign. I'm glad you have a vet who is familiar with holsitic medicine. You might want to seek other opinions if there is good opportunity for that. We were fortunate that we had speciality centers and the vet school to consult with, and our vet was very supportive of us in this process.

Please do keep us posted, will you?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2013, 11:13 AM
 
1 posts, read 5,385 times
Reputation: 15
Default Spindle cell tumor and hip dysplasia

Hello Dog Lovers

Rare Bear is registered Australian Cattle Dog that turned thirteen at the beginning of 2013. His weight is about fifty pounds. He has a spindle cell tumor the size of walnut. It has grown, but very slowly. The tumor is on the side of his right rear paw; does not affect his gait. I read when air hits cancer cells, they spread faster. I chose not to put him through the trauma of surgery. As of today, he is happy, loves to play and EAT.
Sadly he was born with severe hip dysplasia (unethical breeder). He was on Rimadyl. I found a natural product named DogtorX, and it is expensive. However, Bear can jump again. Unsure if it will work for your pet, but I see the difference on both of my four-legged kids.

I read the other remarks. I did not know cancer loves carbs. Changing Bear's diet and probably mine too.

Warmly
Rare Bear's Mom
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top