U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-03-2016, 09:05 AM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,153 posts, read 17,379,398 times
Reputation: 5025

Advertisements

NY no more, and others...

Some of this may be helpful to you about TKIs and you might want to ask your
vet(s) about this.

Traditional chemotherapy drugs work by causing damage to DNA within cells, without regard to whether the cell is a tumor cell or a healthy cell. This is the reason for some of the side effects seen with chemotherapy, including adverse gastrointestinal signs and lowered white blood cell counts.

The mechanism of action of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is very different. These drugs work primarily by inhibiting the action of a receptor on the surface of mast cells that is mutated in about 20-30 percent of tumors. When the receptor is mutated, it causes uncontrolled cell division, leading to tumor growth.
TKIs can also work by inhibiting the growth of blood vessels to tumor cells (this is called anti-angiogenesis therapy). This mechanism of action is separate from the previously mentioned mechanism, which means tumors without the specific receptor mutation may still have a good response to treatment.

Chemo Treatments for Mast Cell Tumors in Pets | petMD

Also, see www.hemopet.com
and check the holistic section of their website. This is a great organization doing good work for our dogs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-03-2016, 04:38 PM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,153 posts, read 17,379,398 times
Reputation: 5025
Here is another interesting item in an article on canine cancers, treatment and diet.

Dr. Patrick Mahaney of Los Angeles, CA, who specializes in natural and alternative treatments for pets says this type of pet care is imperative before a cancer diagnosis and should begin once you decide to own an animal.

“You want to be sure that while your pet is being treated that their food is not going to further contribute to cancer.”

What to Do When Your Dog Has Cancer | petMD
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2016, 08:39 AM
 
10 posts, read 8,451 times
Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY No More View Post
Hi, my baby girl Parker is a 10 year old bloodhound boxer mix. She has 2 spindle cell tumors, one on her paw and one on her chest. Both are golf ball sized. We have had a battery of tests and 3 surgical consults and after reading through this blog I have more questions and feel less sure of what to do-I wish I had found this site before now as it just re-enforces how much I feel like I still don't know. Can anyone tell me if there is a way to know what stage the cancer is in by doing tests? I ask because the surgeon is recommending removing both tumors but not the paw itself even though she admits she will not be able to get all the cells from the paw. After reading through this blog it sounds like there is a good chance that the tumor will grow back and that the chances are based on the stage on the cancer-is this true? Also, I'm being told that bypassing surgery and having either radiation or chemo is not a viable solution for these types of tumors-is that everyone understanding? Sorry, I have just been so stressed out about trying to make the best decisions for Parker and finding this site and other people going through this is like a life line. Any information or input would be so greatly appreciated. Also, I am very interested in getting details about the no card diet. Parker is currently on a grain free limited ingredient diet because she had emergency surgery for a twisted stomach / bloat last year. Thanks in advance, Susan


Hi Susan,
The only way to know what stage cancer a tumor is to do a large biopsy with histology analysis performed. If a large biopsy is to be done you may opt for full tumor removal. My lab had a spindle cell tumor on her chest. I first noticed it in 2014 when it was the size of a walnut. It was very slow growing and reached the size of a grape fruit almost two years later. I debated surgery several times and consulted with board certified surgeons on several occasions. All recommended wide margins but stated that it would be very difficult to 100% get all the tumor. I was at the point where the tumor was about to burst (it started oozing) so I opted to try de-bulking it and take my chances instead of putting her down. That was March 2016 and after a very difficult few days my lab recovered very well and is now six months post surgery I have detected a small lump in the same area (about the size of an acorn). I am not sure if this is the tumor re-growing or scar tissue. My lab is 14.5 years old and doing very well.


Everything I have researched - and I have researched this type of cancer extensively - is that it is slow growing, usually low grade, difficult to remove 100% and very likely to regrow and does not respond well to chemo or radiation. I have my lab on a grain free diet and she is happy as can be.


Rick
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2016, 04:54 PM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,153 posts, read 17,379,398 times
Reputation: 5025
Good job, Rick. Good job!!

Praying for continuation of the 'happy as can be' state...!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2016, 06:24 PM
 
1 posts, read 771 times
Reputation: 10
Southward bound if you are still out there and still willing to provide the information on the holistic diet that you did I would love to get that. My sweet 14-year-old Samoyed Chow mix was just diagnosed with her second spindle cell tumor. We removed the first one almost 3 years but as these tumors do it has come back. The vet doesn't think a second surgery is going to be the best route and I would love to make the time she has left some quality time so if I can do anything for her with diet change etc. I'm going to do it. I will take any and all advice
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2016, 07:50 PM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,153 posts, read 17,379,398 times
Reputation: 5025
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alabama love View Post
Southward bound if you are still out there and still willing to provide the information on the holistic diet that you did I would love to get that. My sweet 14-year-old Samoyed Chow mix was just diagnosed with her second spindle cell tumor. We removed the first one almost 3 years but as these tumors do it has come back. The vet doesn't think a second surgery is going to be the best route and I would love to make the time she has left some quality time so if I can do anything for her with diet change etc. I'm going to do it. I will take any and all advice
Again, so sorry to hear of another case. I do know how you feel, as other posters here do as well. We all have been, or are, in the same (similar) boat. They have made some good suggestions on what worked for them. All of our treatment program is in these posts earlier. I posted a lot, with detail, and more when questions arose from others. I shared all I could, as I understood it and as it worked for us. I would hope that it would also be very helpful to others. Please skim the posts and jot down any and every comment that you think might be worth researching or discussing with your vet. The entire program we were on came from a vet who practices both traditional medicine and has extensive experience and study in eastern/alternative holistic treatment. She is excellent and we were very happy with the results. Our lab was expected to live, according to traditional specialists at the vet school and others, 7 months at the most beyond the diagnosis. He lived a happy and comfortable life for over 2 years. We are very grateful for that.

I would wish everyone to have that kind of result. If you have any questions after reviewing all the posts (I know it's a lot, but may be helpful to you), come back with any questions you have. The posters here are a wonderful resource and support.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2016, 12:11 PM
 
1 posts, read 737 times
Reputation: 10
I found this while looking up my dogs recent diagnosis and wanted to give a recent perspective. I have a golden/collie mix and she is turning 10 this November. 3 years ago i noticed a small golf ball sized bump on her left side just behind her front leg. I took her to the vet and they did a biopsy which came back as inconclusive and the vet at the time told me it was more than likely a cyst, and because of her age they would NOT recommend surgery. They also told me that because the lump was so small and because you can move it, meaning it wasn't attached to her rib that it wasn't too worrisome. At the time I was a full time college student and part time worker so coming up with the cost for surgery wasn't easy. However, fast forward to roughly 6 months ago a new vet took a look at the bump which had slowly progressed to about the size of a baseball and said she would want to get it out and gave me an estimate. She didnt understand why the vet told me prior they couldnt do it. While i waited to save the funds the bump grew a little faster to about the size of a softball and had started to shift from a perfect circle to more lumpy. The day of her surgery I was a mess, did i make the right decision? is she too old? The vet gave me a call shortly after dropping her off and said she was very concerned about the size, they went in and removed all they could, it turned out there was a large blood pool that could have ruptured if she ran into anything. I got the call yesterday that it came back as a low intermediate stage spindle cell. On the positive side the cancer is not in her blood stream but there is a 30% chance on the growth reforming in the same spot, and a 20% chance on a new one forming elsewhere. For being a week shy from 10 you'd never know she just had major surgery, she is a very active, play full dog that loves all her toys, her beanie baby in particular, loves to swim and camp and will run circles around our other dogs. Radiation I've decided isn't for us regardless of if the tumor comes back, which we are hoping it doesn't obviously but she's far too happy and i want the remaining years i have with her to be the best. For anyone else contemplating whether or not a lump seems serious, i would consider getting a biopsy, and if the lump is small enough or in a place where i might impact their health if it got bigger, get it removed. 3 years ago if the vet hadnt told me my dog was too old i would've gotten it out way before now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2016, 07:22 PM
 
5 posts, read 3,437 times
Reputation: 21
I just registered tonight for this forum and have read up to page 15. I am leaving for an event tonight but will post more about my dog and myself tomorrow. For now she was diagnosed with Spindle Cell Sarcoma Mon and her mass is on her left hind leg approx 5 cm6 cm. She is a 12 yr old pittie/cattle dog mix as far as we know. I lost her companion of 10 yrs in June to lymphoma... Southward Bound you seem to be the experienced one here with both of these cancers. I am going to read more of the posts tomorrow but will want to pick the brains for more about exactly what I can do holistically. I know about mushrooms, turmeric and diet already from my experience with my other dog but this one is new for me and I am conflicted about doing any surgery and radiation which my vet is most likely going to want me to do. Thank you all for being here.

Katy
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2016, 06:50 AM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,153 posts, read 17,379,398 times
Reputation: 5025
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missys Human View Post
I just registered tonight for this forum and have read up to page 15. I am leaving for an event tonight but will post more about my dog and myself tomorrow. For now she was diagnosed with Spindle Cell Sarcoma Mon and her mass is on her left hind leg approx 5 cm6 cm. She is a 12 yr old pittie/cattle dog mix as far as we know. I lost her companion of 10 yrs in June to lymphoma... Southward Bound you seem to be the experienced one here with both of these cancers. I am going to read more of the posts tomorrow but will want to pick the brains for more about exactly what I can do holistically. I know about mushrooms, turmeric and diet already from my experience with my other dog but this one is new for me and I am conflicted about doing any surgery and radiation which my vet is most likely going to want me to do. Thank you all for being here.

Katy
Katy, it's sad to read your post and especially since you just lost one; now you are faced with this. I'm glad you found this forum. You will learn something helpful from every poster who has gone through this or is dealing with it now. Each case is somewhat different but in many ways similar. The more you read and research, the more clarity and direction you will have. No one answer is a sure thing. There are no guarantees. But you will have the comfort of knowing you are doing the best for you and your canine companion, whichever type of treatment you select.

Let us know more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2016, 03:32 PM
 
5 posts, read 3,437 times
Reputation: 21
Thank you for your quick response Southward Bound. I have now read through the entire thread, phew. Son much information to digest.

My dog Missy acts much younger than the 12 yrs she will be in one month. She was a rescue I got when she was a little over 1 yr old and was sick at that time with 3 different kinds of worms, dog flu and had just had a little of pups about 2 months prior to my taking her in. She has been in good health ever since except for her thyroid and recent blood work show that as well as everything else they test a senior for is within normal limits.

The biopsy was a punch biopsy done under anesthesia after the vet found the large firm mass on her left hind leg during her routine 6 month check up. I was astounded as after my other dog Kimber got lymphoma (I found her lymph gland swollen) I check Missy nearly daily for lumps and bumps but never noticed this mass. I can best describe it as the size of a hockey puck. The lab shows Mitotic Index of 1, Necrois of 1 and Grade 1. My vet is not a surgeon but states she thinks the surgeon will recommend removal and radiation. I am not so sure I am comfortable with that. A Facebook friend said her dog had surgery and never seemed the same after that and the mass was back in 6 months and she put the dog to sleep. I am so not ready to lose another fur baby.

I have questions about the raw food diet ( I read everything on Darwin's site) because The Canine Cancer Handbook I have by Dr Damian Dressler doesn't recommend raw diets for dogs with cancer. I have been making my own dog food since my other dog got lymphoma but now see it wasn't the best since I've been using ground turkey 3lbs with 1 lb ground beef, 4 eggs, 1 1/2 lbs of ground organic greens, 2 apples with a 6 oz container of blueberries, 3 carrots and hemp seeds. I make this into patties and bake for 30 min at 376 degrees. I mix a half a patty with Call of the Wild Bison/Venison Kibble. For treats I give codfish skins or sardines. I also sometimes mix in canned salmon. I will switch to mackeral now and I'm going to restart making Golden Paste with organic turmeric and organic virgin coconut oil.

Have any of you used CBD the Rick Simpson oil for your dogs with this and have any of you done absolutely No surgery? Also when Kimber had lymphoma they put her on a short course of prednisone to get down the initial inflammation. Has this been used in any of your dogs?

Thanks for any and all new information you can give me.

Katy
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top