U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-02-2012, 01:01 AM
 
43,017 posts, read 49,727,727 times
Reputation: 28742

Advertisements

I don't know what to think. My old lab has been having some accidents in the house, probably five accidents over the past few months. Sometimes I hear him pacing frantically. If I don't get down there immediately, he has an accident. But it seems that he won't go #2 unless he absolutely has to go, like an intense urge to go. It seems to me like he's holding it in, like he'd just rather not do it, until he can't avoid doing it. And because of that sometimes he can't get outside fast enough.

Today, I just had him outside before leaving for a quick run to the store. I was only gone 15 minutes. I come back and find him laying on his dog bed with his poop. WITH. He could have layed anywhere else. I wonder if he's pooping while laying down.

Hubby says that it's taking him a very long time to poop outside. I'm wondering. Is it because it hurts him too much to squat? I saw his legs almost give out on him when stood back up from peeing spread eagle today. If he can get away with it, he likes to poop while walking these days, literally without squatting. But sometimes he still does an outright squat.

Is he afraid to poop? That's what I'm suspecting. I told hubby that I think we should stand outside with him, instead of just letting him out. He is insecure when we're not around because he knows he can rely on us to help him if something happens. Do you think staying next to him while outside would give him the courage to poop on his typical schedule? Maybe he's trying to avoid the cold weather due to his arthritis.

It just broke my heart to find him laying with his turds. I told him to stay because I was afraid he'd step in it if he stood up. He patiently waited for me to clean it up. He's such a good, sweet dog.

He's still so happy. He's still so alert. He has his smell, his hearing and his eyesight is good except for his night vision. It's not time. I'm just wondering how we can better help him overcome this poop delema he has. Diapers would humiliate him. Not an option. He deserves his dignity. Having accidents is one thing but a diaper woud destroy him.

Last edited by Hopes; 01-02-2012 at 02:14 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-02-2012, 01:12 AM
 
Location: California
2,940 posts, read 2,187,869 times
Reputation: 5263
Your dog is in need of medical care.

It is cruel to let him suffer, which he is, as animals will not lay in their own dirt unless something is very wrong.

Please take your "beloved" dog to vet at once.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2012, 01:44 AM
 
43,017 posts, read 49,727,727 times
Reputation: 28742
Of course something is wrong. He's almost 17 years old. Old dogs start losing control of their bodily functions.

That's what happens in old age, even to people. He's not going to the vet for pooping on his bed.

He's not ready to be put to sleep. He's still happy and alert. He has weak back legs but he's not disabled, not at all.

This wasn't different from how he would lay down in the grass with a dingleberry, waiting for us to come and solve the problem for him.

When it comes to poop, he has ALWAYS layed with it waiting to be helped HIS ENTIRE LIFE.

I know my dog. You don't. He is not suffering.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2012, 03:04 AM
 
43,017 posts, read 49,727,727 times
Reputation: 28742
For anyone who has an elderly dog with incontinence, I found this excellent article filled with detailed advice.

Scroll down to the "Incontinence" or "Bowel Incontinence" sections.

http://www.srdogs.com/Pages/care.cd.html

It also has sections with detailed information on many other elderly health issues.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2012, 03:32 AM
 
43,017 posts, read 49,727,727 times
Reputation: 28742
It's sleep pooping! That's why he was laying there with it. He didn't know.

And it's due to the deterioration of his spine, the very reason his back legs are weak.

Apparently with spinal deterioration they can't control their bowels when they are relaxed (i.e. sleeping).

That also explains when he is suddenly jumping up from sleeping and frantically wanting out. He catches himself those times.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2012, 04:17 AM
 
Location: Canada
3,169 posts, read 2,728,316 times
Reputation: 4983
I'm sorry I didn't see this post sooner - my female GSD does this - she is 96 pounds, not overweight, and will be 11 years old in April. She's a lot younger than your dog but she is an old dog for such a large dog. Her problem is two-fold - she has become extra clingy and I need to be outside with her for her to go, and she also has dog MS and she can't feel it right away when she needs to go.

She pooped in her sleep not that long ago, but what she had been doing more of at night when the urge would suddenly register, is go into the furnace room downstairs - no carpet, concrete floor, not a place we normally use and therefore not part of her territory - and take a dump there. She was trying to do the best she could while I was sleeping.

I clean it up without making her feel bad. And I stay outside with her and make a point of going often enough so that she has a chance if she cares to take it, with me in sight.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2012, 07:32 AM
 
43,017 posts, read 49,727,727 times
Reputation: 28742
Mine too became more clingy. I know the reason. Our neighbor dog a full grown puppy used to dash over into our yard and fly around. She knocked him down once. After that, he would stand between my legs whenever she came over. The neighbors long since rehomed her to a family with a farm, but he's still afraid to be alone. If we don't go out with him, we stand at the door and he keeps a close eye on us.

He won't poop if he's on a leash in the yard, nor if we're standing right next to him. He would poop on a leash for walks, but he isn't supposed to go for walks because of the degeneration of his spine. He's doing great. A year ago, he couldn't walk at all.

His back end just gave out on him while he was in the yard. I had to carry him into the house. He's not overweight eithe Now his muscles are wasting so he weighs even less. He's still a big dog. Anyways, I was carrying him around for a few weeks. Every hour I'd pull him up off his bed and take him outside to walk around the yard as physical therapy. He takes some medication that helps with his quality of life. But he still can't do stairs, or get into the car, etc. I carry him upstairs as much as possible because he doesn't want to be alone. I him up just now so he could go lay down in the bedroom with hubby who is still sleeping. Here I have arthritis in my back and I'm carrying him. LOL

I don't make him feel bad either. I'd never humiliate him. He can't help it. The first accidents were in the other room, a room that's under construction. He looked embarrassed and ashamed without my saying a word. Yesterday, he just layed there wagging his tail. I don't think he knew it was there until I got a paper towel and picked them up. Later in the evening, I saw him checking and smelling his tail----like checking to see if everything was okay back there. He's really worried about it.

I think you're right. We just need to go out more often and stay out there with him. If we can get him to do his business twice a day outside, I doubt he'll have accidents inside because he has only pooped twice a day since he's fed twice a day. Unlike my other dog who poops every time he's outside! Then again, he could still have accidents. We'll just take it one day at a time. I'll buy a doggy bed that can be disinfected. We'll throw blankets over it to make it cozy because blankets can be washed.

I'm just a bit sad now that I've learned this is part of his degenerative spine. I'm hoping it doesn't mean that he's one step closer to complete paralysis someday. When he couldn't walk last year, the thought of putting him to sleep was rough because he's so mentally alert and happy. The vet said his eyes are too bright for it to be time. She was right. We got another year of quality life. We're doing our best to keep his quality of life.

Thanks for sharing about your GSD!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2012, 07:56 AM
 
8,394 posts, read 7,327,680 times
Reputation: 8970
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I'm sorry I didn't see this post sooner - my female GSD does this - she is 96 pounds, not overweight, and will be 11 years old in April. She's a lot younger than your dog but she is an old dog for such a large dog. Her problem is two-fold - she has become extra clingy and I need to be outside with her for her to go, and she also has dog MS and she can't feel it right away when she needs to go.

She pooped in her sleep not that long ago, but what she had been doing more of at night when the urge would suddenly register, is go into the furnace room downstairs - no carpet, concrete floor, not a place we normally use and therefore not part of her territory - and take a dump there. She was trying to do the best she could while I was sleeping.

I clean it up without making her feel bad. And I stay outside with her and make a point of going often enough so that she has a chance if she cares to take it, with me in sight.
Yes, you are right to allow her to keep her dignity. My old boxer, 16+ years also went through this for a couple months before we had to decide to let him go. It is never easy to do this, but for his sake it finally seemed more humane than letting him suffer the terror he had when he had an accident. He had been having many problems for the last several months prior to the bowel problems. Winston was a love of my life, I will never forget him, neither will my 4 sons who were raised w/ him. We (all but my oldest son) were in the room w/ him, spent lots of time it was heartbreaking to let him go, but I know that it was the right thing for him I had one son that had the hardest time coming to grips prior to our all making the decision. My youngest child took his brother aside and said "You can't keep Winston alive and suffering just because you'll miss him when he's gone". One thing I would have done differently, now that I have been through this, I would have spent so much more time holding, stroking and loving on my dog in his last months.
OP, I am sharing this because there may be someone reading these posts that needs to hear what some of us have to say. I realize from your responses to the kindness of some of the other posters, that you are hurt and angry that anyone suggests it may be time. But, please think about what your dog may be going through, and suffering. Dogs do not let us know they are suffering, it is in their DNA not to. Please know that you will/are doing the right thing as you see fit. but, please don't be hateful to those of us answering your question w/ our opinions. That is what this forum is all about. Some people ask/post threads, than virtually attack anyone that responds, it is not right. Be kind to your dog, medical treatment is helpful for these issues. all the best

Last edited by JanND; 01-02-2012 at 08:07 AM.. Reason: spelling
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2012, 08:21 AM
 
43,017 posts, read 49,727,727 times
Reputation: 28742
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanND View Post
Yes, you are right to allow her to keep her dignity.
netwit and I are BOTH allowing our dogs to have dignity.

Moderator cut: snip

Quote:
Originally Posted by JanND View Post
OP, I am sharing this because there may be someone reading these posts that needs to hear what some of us have to say. I realize from your responses to the kindness of some of the other posters, that you are hurt and angry that anyone suggests it may be time.
Moderator cut: snip

I'm sorry for the loss of your dog, having to put him to sleep. I know what that's like. I put my 22 peekapoo to sleep. I went into the room with her. I held her until the very end. 22 years I had that dog. My parents got her for me when I was 6. I had her put to sleep when I was 28. I made the decision all on my own. Went all by myself. I am not a clueless person when it comes to these things.

If you think about that, my peekapoo was literally my entire life (from age 6 until 28) and as a younger adult I knew when to do the right think, just like I'll know when to do the right thing with this dog.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JanND View Post
But, please think about what your dog may be going through, and suffering. Dogs do not let us know they are suffering, it is in their DNA not to. Please know that you will/are doing the right thing as you see fit.
I am doing what I see fit. And right now I see fit to ask people for advice on how to help my dog poop!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JanND View Post
but, please don't be hateful to those of us answering your question w/ our opinions. That is what this forum is all about. Some people ask/post threads, than virtually attack anyone that responds, it is not right.
. Moderator cut: snip

Quote:
Originally Posted by JanND View Post
Be kind to your dog, medical treatment is helpful for these issues. all the best
For goodness sake, did you not read my last post? My dog is under the care of a vet. I was 100% prepared to put him to sleep last year. The vet said it wasn't time. And she was right! I wasn't about to rush for a visit over an accident in his bed. I talked to the vet this morning and she doesn't think this is a problem whatsoever. She said it's the normal course for his disease. And she doesn't think it's a big issue because he has only had 5 accidents over the past few months. This is the first time in his bed.

Last edited by Keeper; 01-02-2012 at 04:21 PM.. Reason: orphaned/rude
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2012, 08:36 AM
 
1,231 posts, read 1,152,954 times
Reputation: 1794
God bless you Hope! Taking care of a senior can be tough - made tougher because so much of it has to be intuitive on your part. He is a lucky pup to have spent his 17 years with a caring family.
It is difficult not to be sad about seeing the hardships your dog has to endure getting older. Please don't take this as I am telling what to do or assuming you haven't already had the same thoughts but what helped me was to think of a symptom like this as a wake up call that time together is limited and to make the most of it! Treat him like a king so the thought of how you helped in his last days will help you when it really is the end.
Here's to him having a long reign under your roof!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top