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Old 02-07-2012, 01:02 PM
 
Location: zone 5
7,330 posts, read 13,173,178 times
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I don't think anyone's arguing that. I've heard many stories of rescues making ridiculous refusals of adopters. I've also seen some people who really want a pet but have no business owning one. It's a fine line you have to walk to find animals the home they need, and also have that be a home where they'll have a good life.
Anyway, I like the point of the article that if you run into a rescue that has really narrow standards for adoption, there are others out there who have more common sense rules. I've heard way too many people say they won't try the adoption route again because of one or two overprotective rescues they've run across.
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Old 02-07-2012, 01:10 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 19,789,169 times
Reputation: 6213
Quote:
Originally Posted by _ataraxia View Post
there's a pretty big difference between a potential adopter who clearly knows nothing about the animal they want to adopt and gives you that "don't do it" gut feeling... and a potential adopter who has experience with the animal they want to adopt and has carefully planned everything from meal and walk schedules to training to vet care, then turning them down because they live in an apartment, or plan to put a dog in an appropriately sized crate when it's home alone, or they have a job and can't be home with the animal 24/7...
That is spot on.
indeed the problem is when the concern for the dog goes beyond the appropriate steps and checks to get it into a good home, almost to the point where the group doesn't feel anyone but them is good enough for their little baby. they will reject the perfect person because I trully belive some of them don;t want to let go of the animals so they find excuses for denying the aplicant.
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Old 02-07-2012, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,413 posts, read 5,108,375 times
Reputation: 7213
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayfouroh View Post
But you guys had a feeling this was not a good match, no amount of paperwork, background checks, home visits, etc. were going to change it.
Yup, but the dog had been in foster care for 4 months and this was the only interest so sometimes you gotta give it the benefit of the doubt and hope for the best.

It ain't like were turning away adopters left and right in this poor rural southern area. Some of the puppies that we take in don't come from the pound they come from boxes thrown into or set beside the county garbage dumpsters.

In 2010 of the 210 dogs that came under our care only 71 were adopted out by us, while 139 went on transport to other organizations so 1/3 local and long distance, 2/3 on transport, mostly because we just do not have enough foster homes.
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Old 02-07-2012, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
4,706 posts, read 10,128,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrs1885 View Post
Wow. I've never heard of a shelter going to such lengths with checks for dogs! You must live up north. In the south you walk in, pick you dog and go home. For my rescue I did home visits to make sure the dog was adjusting to the new home well, make sure there wasn't an overly used kennel in the back yard that would tell me the dog is being left out there much too long, that the home owners have hidden electric cords and such in case they're adopting a chewer, etc. We do run them through a national database of dog abusers, but it's not like it's an FBI background check. I don't care if you were speeding on your way to church, just want to make sure you've not had a history of animal abuse or neglect. I NEVER required fenced yards or home ownership. If you are renting I do make sure with the landlord that you could have an indoor dog. I do that with the shelter as well. It doesn't make sense to send a dog to a place it's now allowed to be. Same with the background check and vet reference. But those are the only things I check with adopters at the shelter - vet reference, background for animal abuse / neglect, and confirm with a landlord they can have a pet if they're renting.

Our Local shelter does have a volunteer group and they do grill potential adopters. I have never adopted from them so do not know how restrictive they are.When I adopted from the local Human Society ( had 2 dogs and 1 cat from there) they also have lots of rules about who can/can't adopt and I almost got turned down for Dash because I own and live in a condo but then I let them meet Jazz and they decided I knew what I was doing so Dash was mine. Easiest dog I have ever gotten was Chaos, as I called the shelter in Texas asked if they did out of State Adoptions and was told if I could pay the fee and get her pulled out before the her date to be euthanized she was mine. They asked me no questions which I thought was so unusual but I guess many shelters still work this way. So yeah people can get dogs without supporting puppy mills .Some may think going all the way to Texas for a puppy was extreme but I can tell you Chaos has been worth it and I am even more thrilled that she is turning out to be the agility dog I so wanted.

I have seen the flip side where people that are great dog owners and had dogs that lived long happy lives are denied and I think why don't the rescues talk to the person's vet ? Vets know who the good owners are and for a dog to make it past the normal life span of the breed to me says something postive about that owner. My own sister who had a collie that made it to 16 was turned down because she does not have a dog door! well she got a dog from a different group and that lucky dog goes on two long walks a day rain or shine, goes to out door concerts all summer and does agility and is one happy girl all that with out a dog door...imagine that!
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Old 02-07-2012, 03:19 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
9,352 posts, read 16,774,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kayfouroh View Post
I would say yes, many shelters and rescues are way too restrictive, but I understand why. We were looking to adopt through a shelter, but after being told the requirements (reference checks, background checks, in-home visits, landlord discussion since we rent, etc.) we ended up finding a dog at a pet store that was about to be sent away for being too old (6mo old vs mostly 2mo old dogs). Sure, ultimately we supported a mill somewhere, but when a shelter wants so much information it is ridiculous, since we would have been denied since we don't technically have a yard (its not fenced but we use it for our dog).

Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk
I have approved adopters in apartments, in houses with no fenced yard and renting.... for me, it is about what the adopter is willing and able to do to provide the best life possible for the dog......

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrs1885 View Post
Wow. I've never heard of a shelter going to such lengths with checks for dogs! You must live up north. In the south you walk in, pick you dog and go home. For my rescue I did home visits to make sure the dog was adjusting to the new home well, make sure there wasn't an overly used kennel in the back yard that would tell me the dog is being left out there much too long, that the home owners have hidden electric cords and such in case they're adopting a chewer, etc. We do run them through a national database of dog abusers, but it's not like it's an FBI background check. I don't care if you were speeding on your way to church, just want to make sure you've not had a history of animal abuse or neglect. I NEVER required fenced yards or home ownership. If you are renting I do make sure with the landlord that you could have an indoor dog. I do that with the shelter as well. It doesn't make sense to send a dog to a place it's now allowed to be. Same with the background check and vet reference. But those are the only things I check with adopters at the shelter - vet reference, background for animal abuse / neglect, and confirm with a landlord they can have a pet if they're renting.
yep...... this is how it should be......

Quote:
Originally Posted by Squirl View Post
One of the rescue groups I volunteer with goes follows all the steps. After pouring their hearts, money and time in dogs that come to us with broken limbs,emaciated, full of heart worms & tape worms, with mange, fleas and ticks......it is so important to the foster parents and all the folks that donate time and money that the dogs they adopt out go to families with a history of vetting their animals, understanding dogs and being committed to training and exercise, and either owning their homes or having landlord permission to have a dog. Still, with all the checking dogs sometimes are returned for all the usual reasons people need to rehome their dogs and often they are behind in their vetting a bit or have untreated illnesses or injuries.....

I do believe we "rescuers" can become over zealous at times. But, again, after working with a neglected or abused dog for 6 months in my home .... a dog that came to me sick,shy and dispirited and is now happy, healthy and balanced.....I need to be reassured there is a strong likelihood his life will be wonderful going forward. Don't know how to do that other than interviewing the family, visiting their home, researching how prior/present pets are treated with their friends, family & vets, and making sure their landlords don't discover the new pet and threaten eviction.
and this, too......

Quote:
Originally Posted by _ataraxia View Post
there's a pretty big difference between a potential adopter who clearly knows nothing about the animal they want to adopt and gives you that "don't do it" gut feeling... and a potential adopter who has experience with the animal they want to adopt and has carefully planned everything from meal and walk schedules to training to vet care, then turning them down because they live in an apartment, or plan to put a dog in an appropriately sized crate when it's home alone, or they have a job and can't be home with the animal 24/7...
completely unacceptable reasons for denial, imo .....

Quote:
Originally Posted by subject2change View Post
I don't think anyone's arguing that. I've heard many stories of rescues making ridiculous refusals of adopters. I've also seen some people who really want a pet but have no business owning one. It's a fine line you have to walk to find animals the home they need, and also have that be a home where they'll have a good life.
Anyway, I like the point of the article that if you run into a rescue that has really narrow standards for adoption, there are others out there who have more common sense rules. I've heard way too many people say they won't try the adoption route again because of one or two overprotective rescues they've run across.

and that is where the rub lies........


i used to transport for a local breed specific rescue.... they sent me to pick up a dog from a family that had adopted her a few weeks prior.... they told the family that the dog needed to come back for heartworm treatment..... that they had made a mistake and let her go before treatment was completed..... when in reality, i think that they were just regretting the adoption..... the father was a youngish (30 or so), ex military guy and had a number of tattoos.... it about killed me when i met up with them to get the dog.... it was CLEAR they had become very attached to her and she to them..... i had to lift this 70+ lb dog into my car because she wanted to stay with "her people" and could not understand why she was being taken away....

i no longer transport for them...... .
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Old 02-07-2012, 03:20 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 19,789,169 times
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So what is the best way for a person to handle such a security clearance style vetting process?
On one hand I know its easy to simply go to another but do we owe it to the animal to give some form of feed-back to the organization?

I have stopped shopping at stores due to issues but I always feel (even though it may fall on deaf ears) that I need to tell them the reasoning because otherwise they make up their reasonings. If a rescue organizatuion is only adopting out 10% of their fosters and they are not getting feedback, will they make the connection that its their adoption third degree or will they maybe think its the economy, pet stores marketing better, or anything else they conjure up?

If we should be telling them, how is it best done so as not to have our critique come off as bashing which can make them more resolve to get even stricter.
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Old 02-07-2012, 03:20 PM
 
1,928 posts, read 2,619,469 times
Reputation: 1872
the last two of my adopters came after a home visit, vet check etc.
one of the organications were easier on us thatn the other.

one of those is a rottweiler ,so to me it is totally understandable that a home visit
was in order and a thorough check because a lot of rotties come from poor back grounds[ tied out, living in sheds etc.]

where we live now there is one rescue group that hardly do any checks, they just throw the dogs on c-list , they have the same lax policy with their fosters.
since I check the site frequently I often see the same dogs within six months
up for adoption again. then those dogs , now untrained , unruly and older , end up back at the pound.
now how is that helping anything?
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