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Old 03-06-2012, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
23,263 posts, read 28,068,309 times
Reputation: 28701

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Quote:
Originally Posted by John1960 View Post
I wonder if eating out of dishes that people let there pets eat out of is a good idea? I know of people that has done this for years. They say there dish washer is hot enough to kill the germs???
It depends on how hot the water is that the dishwasher uses. Just plain hot tap water might not kill everything. Many dishwashers do heat the water, though.

Pre-washing with hot soapy water and then sending the dish through the dishwasher probably would be safe.
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Old 03-06-2012, 09:27 AM
 
3,593 posts, read 10,642,038 times
Reputation: 5197
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
What motivation would there be to lie about it? It is an observation that three women got sick with an organism commonly found in the mouths of cats and dogs after comforting a sick pet. There is really no reason to doubt the truth of the report.
The title of this "report" screams that there is a risk of infection from comforting a dying pet. No one catches the "MAY" in the title and no one considers that the ACTUAL RISK the very remote at best.

As an example, I could publish a report that "WALKING ON GRASS WHERE YOUR DOG HAS DEFECATED IN THE PAST MAY CAUSE YOU TO CONTRACT AN INFECTION AND DIE" Now all I have to do is provide the supporting documentation of one or two people IN THE WHOLE WORLD that contracted an infection that COULD be associated with dog feces and had walked in their yard. No one who reads it will see that the actual risk of it happening is less than that of being struck by lightning in December. Now that I have gotten everyone into an uproar, dog owners everywhere are advised that they should all be walking on stilts in their back yards so they won't die.

Ridicules? Obviously... but also possible and reportable. As to why would anyone report such a thing - easy answer -GRANT MONEY from out fine US governement. You can get the government to pay you to study just about anything if you can show there is a "health risk" associated to it. Sorry - its junk journalism and slimey
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Old 03-06-2012, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Austin
2,173 posts, read 2,864,854 times
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Then I will just have to get sick. Nothing would keep me from providing that comfort and love to my pet when they needed it the most!
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Old 03-06-2012, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,647 posts, read 26,615,464 times
Reputation: 26590
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post


What motivation would there be to lie about it? It is an observation that three women got sick with an organism commonly found in the mouths of cats and dogs after comforting a sick pet. There is really no reason to doubt the truth of the report.


I've read many articles that were false and/or misleading.

Also:
The organism is found in commonly found in the mouths of cats and dogs. Period. Not just the sick ones. This would mean, if Artie has the organism, that I've been sick since May 2007, when I got Artie and starting loving him up.

I'm not trying to be combative. The OP asked if this article would change my behavior toward my dog if he was sick or dying. My answer was that it would not. That organism may or not be there then... just as it may or may not be there now.

I don't doubt that those women got sick. I just don't believe that it necessarily has to do with them comforting their ill pet. They could have gotten sick years before, too.
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Old 03-06-2012, 10:04 AM
 
2,382 posts, read 4,481,806 times
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I cuddled with both my cats when they were dying/being put to sleep. One of a heart issue, the other of kidney failure.

But I would never use their utensils, lick honey spoons, and their dishes are their dishes (they get washed in the kitchen sink with a paper towels and dried with a paper towel (I don't use our sponge or dishcloth on them)

Common sense really.
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Old 03-06-2012, 10:15 AM
 
Location: On the west side of the Tetons
1,355 posts, read 2,080,165 times
Reputation: 2616
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Right on- ten thousand rep points for you....

Thanks for trying- again- to explain what the article actually says. Nobody, least of all the doctor said not to comfort our passing pets.

I'm wondering if anybody actually READ the article?
Your original question was, "would this information change how you interact with your dying pet?" I think most people were simply answering that question with a resounding, "NO", regardless of any new information. The doctors quoted in the article do not say to avoid comforting you pets, but the title and the first paragraph are certainly written to suggest that doing so could kill you. I don't think that someone is overreacting by finding this upsetting when they have recently shared the end of life journey with a beloved family member.
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Old 03-06-2012, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
23,263 posts, read 28,068,309 times
Reputation: 28701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Va-Cat View Post
The title of this "report" screams that there is a risk of infection from comforting a dying pet. No one catches the "MAY" in the title and no one considers that the ACTUAL RISK the very remote at best.

As an example, I could publish a report that "WALKING ON GRASS WHERE YOUR DOG HAS DEFECATED IN THE PAST MAY CAUSE YOU TO CONTRACT AN INFECTION AND DIE" Now all I have to do is provide the supporting documentation of one or two people IN THE WHOLE WORLD that contracted an infection that COULD be associated with dog feces and had walked in their yard. No one who reads it will see that the actual risk of it happening is less than that of being struck by lightning in December. Now that I have gotten everyone into an uproar, dog owners everywhere are advised that they should all be walking on stilts in their back yards so they won't die.

Ridicules? Obviously... but also possible and reportable. As to why would anyone report such a thing - easy answer -GRANT MONEY from out fine US governement. You can get the government to pay you to study just about anything if you can show there is a "health risk" associated to it. Sorry - its junk journalism and slimey
Here is the entire original article, for anyone who is inclined to read it:

Life-Threatening Respiratory Pasteurellosis Associated With Palliative Pet Care

So the article in the link actually downplayed how sick these three women were. The title of the article was not written by Dr. Myers. Other internet sites have picked up the story and some of them use much more sensational titles. That is to get you to read the article. Do not confuse a title selected by a news editor with the title of the article.

There was no grant money involved. No grant is needed for reports like this, and no one is going to award a grant for an hour or three to review some charts and write a few hundred words. You just describe the cases. Very straight forward. Any doc could do it. Dr. Myers is an Infectious Disease specialist. He has also written about infections due to animal bites with the same organism:

Pasteurella multocida Bacteremia: Report of 12 Cases in the... : Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice

The risk of getting an infection from a dying pet may be small, but why does it anger you so much that a doctor has chosen to report that he has seen three cases within a relatively short time where the only apparent source of the infection was a dying pet? Does human health not count?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
I've read many articles that were false and/or misleading.

Also:
The organism is found in commonly found in the mouths of cats and dogs. Period. Not just the sick ones. This would mean, if Artie has the organism, that I've been sick since May 2007, when I got Artie and starting loving him up.

I'm not trying to be combative. The OP asked if this article would change my behavior toward my dog if he was sick or dying. My answer was that it would not. That organism may or not be there then... just as it may or may not be there now.

I don't doubt that those women got sick. I just don't believe that it necessarily has to do with them comforting their ill pet. They could have gotten sick years before, too.
People do not seem to be getting sick from healthy pets. It may be that in the case of the pets getting palliative care that the number of bacteria were higher in the pets' mouths due to their illness and the practices of the pet owners brought them into more frequent and closer contact with the pets. The fact is that all three had close contact with a dying pet in the weeks before they got sick.

All the report shows is that dying pets may be a source for a potentially serious infection. Do not put something in your pet's mouth and then put it in your mouth, whether the pet is sick or not. You do not have to kiss a sick pet to comfort it. Realize that if you do so, you are comforting yourself more than the pet and that there may be a risk of picking up an infection from the pet.

The original article pointed out that, "A Japanese study found no Pasteurella species in the oral cavity of 19 pet owners who had not kissed their pets, but they isolated Pasteurella from 3 of 5 owners who had kissed their pets."

So you can pick it up from kissing a pet. Far fewer people will get sick than get colonized with the organism, obviously. That does not mean it cannot happen.

These three women were supposedly healthy in general. If you have any kind of an immune problem, I would certainly suggest that you not kiss your pet at all. You will miss it more than the animal does. Your pet will appreciate stroking, pats, and belly rubs just fine. Just wash your hands after you touch your pet and before eating. Very simple, really.
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:03 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 91,989,470 times
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I haven't read all of the responses, but I don't think it's overboard to be smart about how you interact with a dying pet, just as it is smart how you interact with a dying human. We should always be aware of germs and be attentive to washing hands, etc., after touching people and animals.

Even when people and pets are healthy, I'm attentive to washing my hands to not spread germs to myself and others. Safety precautions are to wash up after holding them. Don't put our hands to our face, mouths, eyes, after touching them.

I'm sorry but a person would have to be an idiot to share a spoon with an ill animal because it's not something we should do with an ill person either.
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,532 posts, read 10,841,704 times
Reputation: 19114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
I'm sorry but a person would have to be an idiot to share a spoon with an ill animal because it's not something we should do with an ill person either.
Consider that that statement may be true or it may be a fabrication to show what fools people with pets are. People who support animal testing do lie. They don't like pets because they don't want people to think of animals as objects of love.
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,647 posts, read 26,615,464 times
Reputation: 26590
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
These three women were supposedly healthy in general. If you have any kind of an immune problem, I would certainly suggest that you not kiss your pet at all. You will miss it more than the animal does. Your pet will appreciate stroking, pats, and belly rubs just fine. Just wash your hands after you touch your pet and before eating. Very simple, really.
I do have an immune disease -- multiple sclerosis -- but as far as I know, I haven't gotten sick from Artie. I consider him curative in so many ways.
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