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Old 03-09-2012, 06:37 AM
 
822 posts, read 2,669,239 times
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We have an adorable 4 month old miniature schnauzer puppy (white, I mention this for a reason). A few days ago (Wednesday night, I'm writing this on Friday morning) she was suddenly shaking and couldn't walk, her back legs seemed almost paralyzed. We took her to the emergency vet and assumed that she had gotten into something toxic.

She had an extremely fast heart rate, which they slowed. They did all of the toxicology tests and everything was negative. They did blood work, and something on her liver and it was all negative.

Yesterday she had 2 full blown seizures. They were both immediately after we visited her. (Last night we visited for 1.5 hours, she was almost back to normal, ate voraciously, drank water, cuddled in my arms; then minutes after returning home they reported her second full seizure).

We have gone back and forth on the "something toxic" versus "something congenital". The quick heart rate (so fast it couldn't be counted) fits a toxin or neurotoxin, but does it fit with epilepsy or "small white dog shaker syndrome"? But they think the two seizures don't fit with the toxin theory.

Does anyone have any thoughts or have a similar experience? Any questions I am forgetting?
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Old 03-09-2012, 07:27 AM
 
653 posts, read 736,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blossom4792 View Post
We have an adorable 4 month old miniature schnauzer puppy (white, I mention this for a reason). A few days ago (Wednesday night, I'm writing this on Friday morning) she was suddenly shaking and couldn't walk, her back legs seemed almost paralyzed. We took her to the emergency vet and assumed that she had gotten into something toxic.

She had an extremely fast heart rate, which they slowed. They did all of the toxicology tests and everything was negative. They did blood work, and something on her liver and it was all negative.

Yesterday she had 2 full blown seizures. They were both immediately after we visited her. (Last night we visited for 1.5 hours, she was almost back to normal, ate voraciously, drank water, cuddled in my arms; then minutes after returning home they reported her second full seizure).

We have gone back and forth on the "something toxic" versus "something congenital". The quick heart rate (so fast it couldn't be counted) fits a toxin or neurotoxin, but does it fit with epilepsy or "small white dog shaker syndrome"? But they think the two seizures don't fit with the toxin theory.

Does anyone have any thoughts or have a similar experience? Any questions I am forgetting?
Huh, I'm perplexed. I was going to share our experience of our pup having a seizure due to lack of eating. She wasn't well so she wasn't eating, and by not eating just those one or two meals caused her bloodsugar level to drop enough that, since she's such a tiny pup (a Chihuahua), it caused her to have a seizure. I've since learned the trick of getting her blood sugar back up using syrup on your finger, when they won't eat (of course, food is better, but syrup is better than nothing for these small breeds).

But you said your pup ate just before her second seizure, so unless she got into something, I can't think of anything else it could be. Hopefully someone else has some experience with that and can chime in.

I'm so very sorry your little one and your family are going though this. I know firsthand how scary it is.
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Old 03-09-2012, 08:35 AM
 
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Thank you! If she has a seizure disorder I will definitely read up on all kinds of nutrition tips also.

My main question for the vets is: would there be the rapid heart rate with a seizure disorder? To me it suggests maybe there was a toxin. Trust me, she is into everything! It's at least a wake up call about keeping everything out of the way, even if that's not "it".
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Old 03-09-2012, 08:43 AM
 
653 posts, read 736,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blossom4792 View Post
Thank you! If she has a seizure disorder I will definitely read up on all kinds of nutrition tips also.

My main question for the vets is: would there be the rapid heart rate with a seizure disorder? To me it suggests maybe there was a toxin. Trust me, she is into everything! It's at least a wake up call about keeping everything out of the way, even if that's not "it".
Yes, with any puppy, but especially tiny breeds, nearly EVERYTHING has a possibility to hurt them, even when they're full grown.

Not to scare you, but even take care with products you use in your home as a tiny amount in their environment can have a big reaction in such a small dog. I have two Chis that are siblings (so same genes). My boy is as strong as a horse. My girl is VERY reactive to just about everything. We no longer use any floor or counter cleaners (even the eco ones we used to use), but rather use a hot water steam clean (you can get one at Target). For areas we want to get especially clean (like under the puppy pad) we also use a homemade cleaner of lemon & vinegar in a spritz bottle so we know it's completely 100% safe. And everything gets put away at all times (especially loose change, rubberbands, and paperclips), which is how I prefer it any way.

I'd never had little dogs before, so I didn't consider their specific needs. Now that I do, while it took a smidge of adjusting, it was worth it to not be rushing her to the Pet ER for yet another attack from goodness knows what - as she has reactions to so many household items, all eco-friendly, that it was mind boggling (she once had a reaction just breathing in the perfume on my neck).

Just know that you're doing a good job because you're being proactive. I hope you find your answer soon! Keep us posted!!!

Last edited by dclamb3; 03-09-2012 at 09:15 AM..
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Old 03-09-2012, 08:52 AM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 20,655,684 times
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toxins can and will cause seizures, however congenital fits too...sorry your going through this, especially with such a young baby...
have you contacted the breeder about this yet? i would, let them know whats going on, see if theyve had similar periences or any of the littermates have similar experiences, and if not already asked find out what kind of genetic testing was done on the parents.
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Old 03-09-2012, 09:02 AM
 
2,226 posts, read 1,753,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blossom4792 View Post
We have an adorable 4 month old miniature schnauzer puppy (white, I mention this for a reason). A few days ago (Wednesday night, I'm writing this on Friday morning) she was suddenly shaking and couldn't walk, her back legs seemed almost paralyzed. We took her to the emergency vet and assumed that she had gotten into something toxic.

She had an extremely fast heart rate, which they slowed. They did all of the toxicology tests and everything was negative. They did blood work, and something on her liver and it was all negative.

Yesterday she had 2 full blown seizures. They were both immediately after we visited her. (Last night we visited for 1.5 hours, she was almost back to normal, ate voraciously, drank water, cuddled in my arms; then minutes after returning home they reported her second full seizure).

We have gone back and forth on the "something toxic" versus "something congenital". The quick heart rate (so fast it couldn't be counted) fits a toxin or neurotoxin, but does it fit with epilepsy or "small white dog shaker syndrome"? But they think the two seizures don't fit with the toxin theory.

Does anyone have any thoughts or have a similar experience? Any questions I am forgetting?
My sisters King Chas spanel ended up having epilepsy. Poor baby went straight out dead, stiff like a dog that had rigormortis. Think she might have also had fast heartbeat also. She is on meds for life and does fine, although isn't super active obviously.
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Old 03-09-2012, 10:51 AM
 
822 posts, read 2,669,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxywench View Post
toxins can and will cause seizures, however congenital fits too...sorry your going through this, especially with such a young baby...
have you contacted the breeder about this yet? i would, let them know whats going on, see if theyve had similar periences or any of the littermates have similar experiences, and if not already asked find out what kind of genetic testing was done on the parents.
Good idea, I will do that!
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Old 03-09-2012, 10:52 AM
 
822 posts, read 2,669,239 times
Reputation: 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by dclamb3 View Post
Yes, with any puppy, but especially tiny breeds, nearly EVERYTHING has a possibility to hurt them, even when they're full grown.

Not to scare you, but even take care with products you use in your home as a tiny amount in their environment can have a big reaction in such a small dog. I have two Chis that are siblings (so same genes). My boy is as strong as a horse. My girl is VERY reactive to just about everything. We no longer use any floor or counter cleaners (even the eco ones we used to use), but rather use a hot water steam clean (you can get one at Target). For areas we want to get especially clean (like under the puppy pad) we also use a homemade cleaner of lemon & vinegar in a spritz bottle so we know it's completely 100% safe. And everything gets put away at all times (especially loose change, rubberbands, and paperclips), which is how I prefer it any way.

I'd never had little dogs before, so I didn't consider their specific needs. Now that I do, while it took a smidge of adjusting, it was worth it to not be rushing her to the Pet ER for yet another attack from goodness knows what - as she has reactions to so many household items, all eco-friendly, that it was mind boggling (she once had a reaction just breathing in the perfume on my neck).

Just know that you're doing a good job because you're being proactive. I hope you find your answer soon! Keep us posted!!!
Thank you! This gives me every reason to switch all cleaners, everything. I needed a push and no matter what is going on here, I am definitely going to make sure everything around the house is ultra safe for her!
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Old 03-09-2012, 11:15 AM
 
8,440 posts, read 11,097,035 times
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What are you feeding the puppy? Very important to know current K-9 foods given some are being investigated for toxins. See my thread and the link about this. Unfortunately, so many of the symptoms you list sound way to familiar. Please look at my thread and click on the Consumer Affairs link so you can read the accounts of many other pet owners. Good luck and I hope things improve for your little one

MSR
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Old 03-09-2012, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
4,585 posts, read 10,796,190 times
Reputation: 6615
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxywench View Post
toxins can and will cause seizures, however congenital fits too...sorry your going through this, especially with such a young baby...
have you contacted the breeder about this yet? i would, let them know whats going on, see if theyve had similar periences or any of the littermates have similar experiences, and if not already asked find out what kind of genetic testing was done on the parents.
This would be my first thought...contact the breeder, if they are reputable they will share the costs and/or take the dog back/provide a replacement/refund.
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