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Old 06-03-2012, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,648 posts, read 7,525,709 times
Reputation: 7495

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I did a little research on flea and tick control on pets, and one thing stood out in all the research.
Most that wrote on the subject had one thing in common.
Fleas and ticks have oratory sensors that pick up the scent of what will become their host.
By changing, or altering that scent, the flea/tick is not attracted to what should be their host.
So, what do we as pet owners do to alter the odor given off by our pets that becomes a magnet for these critters?
Simple, take a natural product like garlic, lemon, rosemary, lavender,etc,.. and spread it on the coat, or in the case of garlic, include it in the meal.
There are instruction online as to proper amounts, as well as instruction on how to making these alternative pest controls.
The trick is, making the pet not smell like that which attracts the flea and tick in the first place.
One remedy in particular used lemons as the way to change the natural odor of the pet.
The instructions were, take 6 lemons, cut them in half, place in a pot with one quart of water, and simmer for for an hour or so.
Strain the liquid into a spray bottle and cool.
Then spray on the fur,except not on the face or ears.
For that, spray on your hand, and wipe the face, and ears.
It was mentioned in one of the articles I read that, most manufacturers of these flea/tick products include some chemical to alter the natural odor given off by the animal, thus making the host animal undetectable to the flea or tick.
I used advantage on my dogs for years, and now that I think about it, usually the day after I applied it, they smelled differently.
Not a pleasant , nor a bothersome odor, but definitely a different smell.
So, in the process of finding a new way to keep fleas and tick from my pet, I will try one, or more of these natural remedies.
Altering the odor is the key.
The fleas and ticks are searching for a particular odor that attracts them to a host animal, and simply changing that odor should solve the problem.
This is obviously a simple solution, and one that is very inexpensive, compared to the unending supply of products on pet supply stores shelves.
Bob.
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Old 06-03-2012, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,648 posts, read 7,525,709 times
Reputation: 7495
Quote:
Originally Posted by CALGUY View Post
I did a little research on flea and tick control on pets, and one thing stood out in all the research.
Most that wrote on the subject had one thing in common.
Fleas and ticks have oratory sensors that pick up the scent of what will become their host.
By changing, or altering that scent, the flea/tick is not attracted to what should be their host.
So, what do we as pet owners do to alter the odor given off by our pets that becomes a magnet for these critters?
Simple, take a natural product like garlic, lemon, rosemary, lavender,etc,.. and spread it on the coat, or in the case of garlic, include it in the meal.
There are instruction online as to proper amounts, as well as instruction on how to making these alternative pest controls.
The trick is, making the pet not smell like that which attracts the flea and tick in the first place.
One remedy in particular used lemons as the way to change the natural odor of the pet.
The instructions were, take 6 lemons, cut them in half, place in a pot with one quart of water, and simmer for for an hour or so.
Strain the liquid into a spray bottle and cool.
Then spray on the fur,except not on the face or ears.
For that, spray on your hand, and wipe the face, and ears.
It was mentioned in one of the articles I read that, most manufacturers of these flea/tick products include some chemical to alter the natural odor given off by the animal, thus making the host animal undetectable to the flea or tick.
I used advantage on my dogs for years, and now that I think about it, usually the day after I applied it, they smelled differently.
Not a pleasant , nor a bothersome odor, but definitely a different smell.
So, in the process of finding a new way to keep fleas and tick from my pet, I will try one, or more of these natural remedies.
Altering the odor is the key.
The fleas and ticks are searching for a particular odor that attracts them to a host animal, and simply changing that odor should solve the problem.
This is obviously a simple solution, and one that is very inexpensive, compared to the unending supply of products on pet supply stores shelves.
Bob.
I made an error in the post above regarding the lemon cure.
Instead of 6 lemons, take one lemon, cut it in quarters, add one quart water, and stew overnight.
Not sure what is meant by "stew", but I am going to try this remedy anyway.
Bob.
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Old 06-03-2012, 08:50 PM
 
70 posts, read 176,179 times
Reputation: 56
Really useful. Thank you.
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Old 06-04-2012, 01:38 AM
 
Location: Northern CA
12,770 posts, read 9,836,951 times
Reputation: 4243
I really like this idea, please get back to us with an update.
I have some peppermint oil handy for the mice, but I do like the idea of lavender for fleas n ticks. Dr. Bonners makes a lavender soap, for what it's worth. Reviews are great.
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Old 06-04-2012, 04:09 AM
 
Location: Manhattan, Ks
1,280 posts, read 6,146,576 times
Reputation: 1805
Interesting idea. I was taught long ago that they are attracted to the CO2 that we give off. I haven't read much lately so maybe the thinking has changed on that.

I'd just caution to be careful with essential oils and the amount of garlic you're using, but I think most people here are aware of the issues with them.
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Old 06-05-2012, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
349 posts, read 540,399 times
Reputation: 280
Interesting! I wonder if a good lavender baby wash would work... that "sleepy time" one by Johnson & Johnson?

I'll have to ask my vet about it. My Daisy is on a "special" dog wash for sensitive skin (she's a beagle/jack russell with an awesome allergy to FLEAS. One bite makes her miserable and causes a patch of fur to fall out... even months later! She just got over last years couple of bites. Ugh!) but I'd really like to try something a little less harsh- plus I love lavender

I also use Advantage. And I have noticed that she smells different for a good week after I apply it.
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Old 06-11-2012, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,648 posts, read 7,525,709 times
Reputation: 7495
Well I tried the lemon suggestion, and did not notice any difference.
Perhaps it didn't have a strong enough scent.
I am going to try a doggie deodorant next.
Petsmart sells a couple of different brands.
I will post the results in a few days.
Bob.
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Old 06-15-2012, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
349 posts, read 540,399 times
Reputation: 280
My dog broke out again. There's a small bald patch which indicates a bite on her side, and a patch of fur on her tail has completely lost its color and it's brittle feeling. UGH.

I just can't beat it! Damned inner city... if one dog with fleas walks down the street, every dog after it will get them!

I'm thinking the Advantix isn't strong enough. Do you know if it's safe to double dose? She got hers on the 1st, would it be safe to put another dose on her now? Any ideas?! I dread another trip to the vet.
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Old 06-15-2012, 02:52 PM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,153 posts, read 17,414,140 times
Reputation: 5026
Default natural herbal shampoo

Dr Bonner has a great shampoo (some 18 herbs) intended for people but I know pet owners who use it on their dogs as well. I love it for self and dogs. I believe lavender is one of the ingredients. I use garlic tablets from springtimeinc.com. I have used their products for years. They are all natural.
Don't think I could stand to wipe my dog down with garlic.
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Old 06-15-2012, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Area 51.5
13,904 posts, read 11,476,032 times
Reputation: 9075
Maybe throwing off the scent is why Skin So Soft is said to work so well. It's powerful strong, scent-wise.
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