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Old 06-17-2012, 03:05 PM
 
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I am giving a talk to some seniors about rescuing dogs and the benefits. I thought I would also bring up fostering too.
Anyone have any ideas or suggestions on what I can/should include
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Old 06-17-2012, 05:07 PM
 
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Keeper it may depend up where you are talking to these seniors. Is it a meet up or in a senior center. My focus would be different for either. (one might be more involved than the other)

One thing you might include is your ? help in selecting the right dog for their circumstances.

I am 60 and almost ready to retire. My beloved weimaraner is 16.5 years old. I can't handle the physical demands of another puppy at my age after he goes. And I dread the thought of training another stubborn and highly intelligent young dog that can out think anything on wheels.

So I MIGHT adopt an older rehome weimaraner or one that has calmed down. or two.

But I have put considerable thought into some things 1: I hesitate to get a long lived dog since I am on my own that might live beyond me. and 2. maybe another breed might be easier for me to handle but yet provide for protection and companionship. 3. I just do not like small dogs but do like sporting dogs. However I might be better off with another breed. And I would be no good with a hard case abuse behavioral problem adoption at this point in my life.

So if you could go into the selection process or at least eliminate those concerns, it might help alleviate those types of concern.

I wold be glad to get an adult or senior big black dog from the shelter when the time comes. I just can't train and keep up with a young one anymore. Although I was thinking of putting up an agility course in my fenced yard and give that a go if I ended up with a young energetic dog. I could walk while they ran
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Old 06-17-2012, 05:13 PM
 
Location: West Virginia
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Most older people live in housing where they Cant hve pets. Or there are size & breed restrictions As well as exra costs of Pet deposits & extra rent! And Apts Wont allow Fostering!
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Old 06-17-2012, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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You might tell them that medical studies on seniors have found that those who have a pet seem to have fewer ailments as opposed to those seniors who do not have a pet.
They are sharper in mind, are physically in better shape.
Caring for a pet gives them not only some responsibility, but also gives them something to look forward too.
The benefits to seniors who care for pets are much greater than for those who do not.
If you need more info, google "seniors and pets."
Bob.
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Old 06-17-2012, 06:03 PM
 
Location: On the sunny side of a mountain
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Dogs can bring vitality to their lives. Folks with arthritis can benefit from a nice slow walk with an older dog. A dog can help lower high blood pressure, calm anxiety and be a friend when you feel lonely. Taking care of a dog can bring about new social interactions with other dog people, possibly even be trained to visit senior centers or help with children who have difficulty reading. I think one issue with some seniors is that they want to be able to travel, maybe forming a dog sitter network with other seniors could be helpful.
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Old 06-17-2012, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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If the organization pays for food and care for fostered dogs, that might help somebody decide but then you might end up with somebody who sabotages adoption cause they don't want to give up their free dog.

If we get another dog , it will be a senior dog which nobody else wants and which might be PTS. Guilt is always a good motivator.

I think the exercise dogs need would be a real deterrent to fostering dogs unless someone had a back yard and could play with the dog outside. Seniors are afraid of falling and walking a dog can sometimes be fearful even though it is good exercise.

I think you would have better luck trying to find foster families for cats. 4 of my 65 y.o. facebook friends have just recently adopted their first cats after lifetime of dogs.
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Old 06-17-2012, 07:06 PM
 
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Excellent .. Keep em coming. We have around 20 or more seniors in our lunch group. Yes I am one of them!!!
I have done some research but I know you all have your own opinion.

I thought about mentioning the different breeds in a general way.. such as Great Pyrenese need a job and lots of exercise. Weims are too smart for the own good and can open doors, garbage cans and ice chest. Yes, that is what mine does.
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Old 06-17-2012, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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a lot of people like the way border collies look but they are a breed which needs a job too. I like my Bichon and Maltese cause they are good watchdogs (almost too good) and because they are little velcro dogs. They are lap dogs too. If these seniors are mobile and enjoy getting out, walking a dog is good exercise but also a very social thing to do as you meet lots of new friends when walking a dog.
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Old 06-17-2012, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
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Grooming is also a big thing with some dogs. A chihuahua or greyhound takes almost 0 grooming maintenance, while a collie or afghan might take at least once a day! If you can steer potential adopters toward dogs that will suit their lifestyles - someone who is a little OCD about a clean house probably won't want to vacuum their house every day, or groom a sheepdog - but they might be able to take the smaller, lower-maintenance dogs.

We adopted a herd dog puppy (Aussie shepherd/heeler cross) because we had bought a farm and were raising cows. We needed a smart, active dog to work; but he has become a constant companion to DH and a sharp watchdog as well. When he's bored he brings us a ball or stick to throw until he wears himself out chasing it. Some seniors might not appreciate a dog who wants to play in the snow or swim in the river - but you might be surprised at the seniors who do want to be more, not less, active, and might need a good reason - like a dog.
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Old 06-17-2012, 08:13 PM
 
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Pit Bulls might be good for old people that complain a lot!
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