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Old 07-27-2012, 12:51 PM
 
6,475 posts, read 9,895,846 times
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See if there's a local rescue group, husky or large breed group. If they're short on foster homes, volunteer to keep the dog until a home is found. If they have a website, they'll post the dog's bio and photo on the site, giving the dog exposure to the public.
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Old 07-27-2012, 12:58 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
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Keep in mind that at six months, most pups are still teething and the bigger ones will chew up anything that fits into their mouths. I wouldn't say that she's unusually destructive for a big pup that's teething.

I do agree that if you're gone all day and your son doesn't want to take care of her, then it's better to rehome her.
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Old 07-27-2012, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Hudson County, NJ
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That is really unfortunate and I hate when this happens. Please whatever you do, find someoen that can take care of her, do a background check, and make sure they wont abuse or use the dog as a bait dog for fighting/training.

On the other hand, please contact me as my cousin is looking for a dog. He wants a bigger dog, and is an excellent person. We are in North Jersey and perhaps can arrange something. (Plus I've always loved huskys and it was between them or a German Shepherd, which I went with the Shepherd at the time).

I hope to hear from you soon, if not, please be selective about where the dog goes. Shelters are scary.
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Old 07-27-2012, 02:52 PM
 
501 posts, read 1,106,737 times
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Don't feel badly at all. You recognize that your situation isn't working out. A lot of people, when faced with a similar reality as you find yourself in with Arwen, will never admit this, and their pets (dogs, cats, horses, etc) don't get the opportunity that you are giving to Arwen to find a family that has a situation better suited to him.

I say this as the recent recipient of a young dog, whose owners surrendered him to a "no kill" animal shelter. I can't tell you how lucky we are to have this youngster in our lives, and he has only been here a couple of months. He is getting the daily attention and exercise he needs because we are retired and able to take our dogs everywhere with us. We also live on land (both a large secured area of 3+ acres, and then the much larger rest of it where we hike every day). He is a hunting breed that we know like the back of our hands, having had many over the last few decades, and if it turns out that he enjoys bird hunting, he will get to do that as well. These things weren't possible at his other home. For that matter, this was also mostly true of our other adopted gsp. Both of these gsps were loved, but needed a new situation that suited them better. So it happens - and when a change is necessary, what matters most is careful placement in a good home for the best shot at a happy future.

My current gsp already thinks this youngster is great - watching them burn that energy off in play is fun. So this is working perfectly for him and us. I am hoping you can find what Arwen needs, so that you don't have a worry about his new future. Remember, if my boys' owners hadn't given them up, I'd never have known such cool dogs that are so well suited for our lives. Good luck - like others have said, a local breed organization can be a great help, or a local shelter so long as it is a no kill one.

Last edited by sugarsugar; 07-27-2012 at 03:35 PM..
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Old 07-27-2012, 03:32 PM
 
Location: SWFL
22,777 posts, read 19,218,225 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdotAllen View Post
I didn't get her from a breeder. She was part of an opps litter of a friend. I talked to some people at work, and it seems that somebody might be interested whose husky just passed.

Thank you all for your insight, I can't help but feel like I'm letting her down.
Would this person at work be in the same position? Being at work all day? Or is there someone at home during the day? Good luck to you and Arwen.
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Old 07-27-2012, 04:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdotAllen View Post
Hey All, first off, I am really torn up about this and don't know what else to do. I have a 6 month old Siberian Husky, Arwen, who I have had since she was 12 weeks old. I adore her and wish that I didn't have to do this. But I have to rehome her. My 17 year old son, whom I got her for, wants nothing to do with her. He loved her at first, but now that the novelty wore off and she isn't a tiny little puppy anymore he can't be bothered. I am at work all day, at least 12-13 hour days. All the training I do with her when I am there, he does not reinterate with her during the day.
So since she isn't getting the attention she needs and she has been acting out. She has destroyed so many things. Chewed the cords off my lamp, Xbox 360 and this morning my printer. Eaten endless pairs of socks, underwear, and cat toys. And she has her own toys, so many that my living room floor is covered.
I've been thinking about this for a few weeks, and I think the best thing for her would be to let another family adopt her that will have the time and patience for her.

So my question is, has anybody else had to go through this? I feel absolutly terrible about this, but I need to do what's right & fair for her.
I totally understand if your son is 7, but he is borderline an adult. How about teaching him about commitment and responsibility. When the road gets tough, whether it's a job or college, he should just drop out? When the novelty/fun wore off after the honeymoon, should he head directly to the court and get a divorce? Have you asked yourself why your almost-adult son lacks commitment, dedication, and responsiblity?
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Old 07-27-2012, 05:10 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,119,897 times
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Personally, I wouldn't be giving the son a choice about caring for the dog. Your house, your rules.

Is there any possible way to take your pup to a "doggy daycare" while you are at work and pick up the pup on your way home? Possibly hire a dog walker and build a kennel/large crate so she cannot be destructive while unattended?
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Old 07-27-2012, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,478 posts, read 43,601,063 times
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teaching a 17 year old about responsibility at the expense of a dog is not a good thing.
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Old 07-27-2012, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Durm
5,850 posts, read 8,802,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
teaching a 17 year old about responsibility at the expense of a dog is not a good thing.
Totally agree - better that the dog finds a new home and then she can deal with the son later!
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Old 07-27-2012, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Hudson County, NJ
1,493 posts, read 2,675,728 times
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I think this also should be a lesson to people to read about the breed prior to adopting the animals. A lot of people think dogs are dogs but they all have different traits, behaviors, and needs. You happened to pick a high energy dog that NEEDS a lot of frequent exercise or they will....well destroy things as you have pointed out. Huskys need a lot of time with other dogs, running, dog parks, exercise, or else.

Your son should learn to deal with the dog, but as other said, don't do so at the dogs expense. If he really isn't attached to the animal by now, he never will be. And forcing it may just make him aggravated or abusive.
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