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Old 08-17-2012, 10:35 AM
 
1,613 posts, read 1,517,123 times
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We are looking into getting an adult small-ish dog with a hair type that is unlikely to provoke an allergic reaction. We are not experienced dog owners, so we would probably do best with a dog without major issues (aggression, etc.). I doubt we would pass muster with a rescue, because as non-pet owners to date, we haven't established a relationship with a veterinarian, and we're new to the area and therefore don't have local people we can use as references. Of course, we'll look at area shelters, but their websites feature mostly large dogs, many pit mixes, for adoption.

I have been browsing Craigslist listings for adult dogs from people who say they are moving or want to give their animals away for some other reason. Is there any reason we shouldn't do this? I'm thinking BYBs or other unethical operators would be charging "rehoming fees" for young pups and would be unlikely to be trafficking in full-grown dogs. Am I wrong? Is there any other reason I shouldn't consider using Craigslist listings as a source of dogs?
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Old 08-17-2012, 01:37 PM
 
2,208 posts, read 3,284,236 times
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Yes, for so many many reasons. Use petfinder.com or work through reputable breeding groups. Buying or accepting a pet through craigslist is a HUGE risk and should be very discouraged. No reputable breeder would use it and those trying to adopt out an unwanted dog should use rescue and adoption sites that will vet and temperament test the dogs.
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Old 08-17-2012, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,666 posts, read 26,731,689 times
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I got Artie off of Craigslist.

His previous person had just broken up with her fiance, traveled too much for work to keep a dog, and listed him. She was VERY specific about what type of person she'd give him to. She told me that she didn't even respond to most of the emails, and only spoke to a few people before she and I spoke.

This was in May 2007.

To this day, whenever we go on vacation, she takes Artie. She and I are friends on Facebook and she comments on his photos. She loves him to bits, but just doesn't have the lifestyle -- on her own -- to care for him.

I think that there may be some bad people on Craigslist -- just like there are some bad people everywhere -- but I'd be MUCH more leery of those people who are TAKING dogs, rather than the ones who are re-homing their dog. I feel that someone who knows their limitation and goes the Craigslist route rather than dumping their dog (whether in a shelter or on the road) has some modicum of integrity.

And since you're looking for an adult dog, I don't see how you'd run into the BYB issue.

Good luck!
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Old 08-17-2012, 01:56 PM
 
639 posts, read 1,553,172 times
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There are a lot of scams regarding the type of dog you are looking for (toy, nonshedding, like a Yorkie or Maltese), and also a lot of people will steal those dogs to resell on craigslist for a "rehoming fee" of several hundred dollars. So be very careful who you get it from. If the person seems disinterested in the dog they are giving away, can't provide any type of documentation, they don't know the dogs history, or they charge an unusually high rehoming fee, the dog is stolen property.
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Old 08-17-2012, 01:56 PM
 
Location: zone 5
7,330 posts, read 13,226,567 times
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I wouldn't automatically assume the shelters will turn you down. In some areas, it seems to be more difficult to adopt than in others, but generally you can find shelters with reasonable screening standards. I wouldn't say it's wrong to take a dog that was listed on craigslist if that doesn't work out, and I've been a shelter volunteer for years. I'd want to see vet records though. If you're looking at adults you're probably not dealing with breeders, although puppy millers will dump older dogs that are bred out. Checking with a vet would help you avoid that situation. Yes, you might be giving money to an irresponsible person, but the dog needs a home, and who's to know what the people will do if they don't find one for it.
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Old 08-17-2012, 02:11 PM
 
393 posts, read 667,157 times
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I don't think anything is wrong with it as long as you are smart about it. I don't see the problem with trying rescue shelters though. Just because you are new to the area and have never had a dog before doesn't mean you are not qualified. I'm not familiar with the dog adoption process, but it can't be that hard. If they ask for references, I'm sure they don't have to be local. Check out the pets on Petfinder. If you are looking through CL, really get a feel for the owner before you agree to take the pet. You should be able to feel if something is off.
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Old 08-17-2012, 02:31 PM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,319,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forum_browser View Post
We are looking into getting an adult small-ish dog with a hair type that is unlikely to provoke an allergic reaction.
)))
Many believe there is really no such thing as a hypo allergenic dog as many allergic reactions are caused by dander and stuff that may be in the coat rather than the hair itself. Never the less toy poodle or miniature poodle or maltese might suit you as these are some of the better breeds when it comes to shedding.

(((
Quote:
Originally Posted by forum_browser View Post
We are not experienced dog owners, so we would probably do best with a dog without major issues (aggression, etc.).
)))
Most people do.

(((
Quote:
Originally Posted by forum_browser View Post
I doubt we would pass muster with a rescue, because as non-pet owners to date, we haven't established a relationship with a veterinarian, and we're new to the area and therefore don't have local people we can use as references.
Of course, we'll look at area shelters, but their websites feature mostly large dogs, many pit mixes, for adoption.
)))

I don't know if you're in California (that seems to be one of the places talked about on here where there are no adoptions other than private fosters and they are very picky) or not but my suggestion would be to try municipal animal shelters first. They are typically not picky about who adopts the dogs and adopting from these pounds truly is a rescue as they normally put dogs to sleep that are not adopted. It will require some patience on your part because the cute little non-shedding lap dogs are in the highest demand as you're finding out. And you will probably have to follow the listings for quite some time and get there quick. Don't rush into any decision but you may have to act kinda fast or someone else will get the dog. Ask if you can reserve the dog but "sleep on it" for one night. I always find it helps to sleep on it for big decisions.


(((
Quote:
Originally Posted by forum_browser View Post
I have been browsing Craigslist listings for adult dogs from people who say they are moving or want to give their animals away for some other reason. Is there any reason we shouldn't do this? I'm thinking BYBs or other unethical operators would be charging "rehoming fees" for young pups and would be unlikely to be trafficking in full-grown dogs. Am I wrong? Is there any other reason I shouldn't consider using Craigslist listings as a source of dogs?
)))

I agree. I don't see any problem -ethically- if they are free or under say $50. The reason being is because sometimes people charge a nominal fee so to keep the dog off the dinner plate. You'll know if it's a BYB or not. I would not rush into a decision but read up on what to look for when evaluating a dog. The main liability here is you could end up with a dog with very serious and expensive health problems. There probably isn't going to be a return policy with these people. I would definitely ask to see medical records. You're taking more of a risk doing this than by adopting through a private foster or shelter.

and remember, the process of adopting a dog can be very emotional and also very frustrating. Just try to keep a cool head about it.
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Old 08-17-2012, 02:32 PM
 
51,874 posts, read 41,765,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forum_browser View Post
We are looking into getting an adult small-ish dog with a hair type that is unlikely to provoke an allergic reaction. We are not experienced dog owners, so we would probably do best with a dog without major issues (aggression, etc.). I doubt we would pass muster with a rescue, because as non-pet owners to date, we haven't established a relationship with a veterinarian, and we're new to the area and therefore don't have local people we can use as references. Of course, we'll look at area shelters, but their websites feature mostly large dogs, many pit mixes, for adoption.

I have been browsing Craigslist listings for adult dogs from people who say they are moving or want to give their animals away for some other reason. Is there any reason we shouldn't do this? I'm thinking BYBs or other unethical operators would be charging "rehoming fees" for young pups and would be unlikely to be trafficking in full-grown dogs. Am I wrong? Is there any other reason I shouldn't consider using Craigslist listings as a source of dogs?
Well, it's better than the guy I read about that kept going around adopting cats from various animal shelters.....apparantly he'd figured out it was an inexpensive way to feed his 120lb python.
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Old 08-17-2012, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Northern California
970 posts, read 1,829,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
)))
I don't know if you're in California (that seems to be one of the places talked about on here where there are no adoptions other than private fosters and they are very picky) or not but my suggestion would be to try municipal animal shelters first.
I just had to respond to this because I live in California and there are thousands of dogs in city and county shelters. I've never heard of the idea that you can only adopt through private rescues, and it is definitely not the case in the SF Bay Area or Sacramento area.

To the OP: as long as you do your research, you should be able to get a good dog from most sources. If you go through Craigslist, a good former owner should provide you with medical records and a history of the dog. A lot of legit rescues also advertise on Craigslist. Around here a couple of the smaller city/county shelters will even use Craigslist because they are overcrowded and in rural areas it can be hard to get people into a physical shelter.
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Old 08-17-2012, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,880 posts, read 25,306,858 times
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I would consider it but I have owned and shown dogs for years. I am experienced and I know animals. I know what to look for. But you shouldn't do this. No way. You are not a dog owner. I understand why you want to do this.

Cl for a pet is just like cl for job hunting. One out of 1000 ads is a real gem and most of the others are a real pain. And there's no way for you to tell the difference. And BTW malti-poo and chi-weenie are not dog breeds. They are a back yard accident. And I see ads on cl every day where people are less than truthful about what kind of dog they have. Or it's age. Or how big it will be at adulthood. Free is not always a bargain. Many times, you are just getting someone else's problem.

If you don't care about owning a specific breed and lineage, go to the shelter. Take some time and play with the dog away from the kennel/threatening atmosphere. And take your time to find the right dog for you. It shouldn't be a quick thing. Visit all your friends that have dogs and play with their dogs too. Read some books about dogs/behavior/training. Look and see if the AKC has any shows in your area and go. Talk to the breeders and look at the dogs and their breed specific traits and personalities. Do the work and take the time. You want to get it right the first time. You want the animal you pick to have a loving forever home. Analyze yourself. How much time and interest do you have in training/grooming/etc? Do you have enough space? Do you have enough energy for the dog you want? Just for example, I have always wanted a poodle because they are so smart. But I don't own one because I doubt I would stay on top of the grooming.

There is nothing wrong with owning a mutt. With the right owner, every dog is beautiful and has the heart and soul of a champion.

Yes, quality dogs purchased from breeders are expensive. With good reason. They work unbelievably hard to make matches that produce puppies to meet breed standards. Believe me, they don't just put a couple dogs in the backyard and see what happens. You can meet the parents. The puppies and the ***** are very carefully cared for and the pups are socialized and temperament tested. All their medical needs are met. Most breeders can go back for decades on the lineage of their dogs. Also there are show quality pups and pet quality pups. The pets are less expensive than the show dogs. Also sometimes you can get a bargain from a breeder. They may have an older dog they need to place or perhaps a dog that was returned to them. Don't overlook the possibility of an older animal. You miss the cute puppy stage but you also get a dog that's already trained!

All breeds also have their own rescue association. If your heart is set on a certain breed you can't afford, look here too. You never know what you might find.

I own 2 GSP's. One is in the bed under my desk and the other is sleeping in a chair in the living room. They are members of my family. My big boy, Spot, was a rescue from a pet shop. His breeder died of a heart attack and his widow sold the litter. He was very sick and the pet shop was going to have him euthanized. I recognized immediately he was a quality pup and took him and his papers home that day. My little girl, Lola, was from a shelter in South Dakota. She was a feral dog living on her own. She is most likely purebred and was purchased as a hunting dog. Her owner probably didn't train her and abandoned her in the field when she failed to perform properly. This happens all the time.

We all hit the jackpot when we found each other.
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