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Old 09-10-2012, 02:04 PM
 
Location: On Earth
399 posts, read 579,755 times
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My dog never use to get aggressive when she would get a treat and the cats would come around. She started that lately and I'm trying to figure out why and how to stop it. I was giving the cats a treat and she was nearby and snapped at one of the cats. I scolded the dog and told her "NO" but I don't think that is enough. What more can I do to help save her from going after the cats. Mind you the cats are all bigger than she is but she's not afraid of the cats. She will sometimes try to play with the cats and they will swat her one with their little paw to say nope and she'll walk away.

I think this should be nipped in the bud right?

Or am I over-reacting?

Thanks
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Old 09-10-2012, 06:25 PM
 
Location: In the middle...
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You are correct to nip this in the bud.

If what you did was not enough, you may need to put her on a "down-stay" while the cats get their treat. IF that doesn't work, put her on a leash and then the "down-stay." The leash allows you more control.

IF there is still an issue, you may need to separate them during treat time until you can work out the problem.

Btw, when you give her, her treat, how she take it from you? Is she slow and gentle or fast and aggressive?
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Old 09-10-2012, 07:50 PM
 
Location: On Earth
399 posts, read 579,755 times
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Thank you forgot about the "down-stay" move. Will do this.

She takes HER treat normally with no problem, then goes under furniture to hide to eat it. If one of the cats happen to go under the furniture to investigate what she's eating, then she will growl and I think nip at them. I can't see since she's under either the sofa or the bed, so I can't get down to see what she does exactly, except I know that it's not good.

But I will try the "down-stay" move when I give the cats their treat and see what she does.

Thanks



Quote:
Originally Posted by LuvABull.Denver View Post
You are correct to nip this in the bud.

If what you did was not enough, you may need to put her on a "down-stay" while the cats get their treat. IF that doesn't work, put her on a leash and then the "down-stay." The leash allows you more control.

IF there is still an issue, you may need to separate them during treat time until you can work out the problem.

Btw, when you give her, her treat, how she take it from you? Is she slow and gentle or fast and aggressive?
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:45 AM
 
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You want to nip it in the bud because this can lead to agression with adults and children related to food and/or treats.
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Old 09-11-2012, 02:19 AM
 
Location: In the middle...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaylee11 View Post
Thank you forgot about the "down-stay" move. Will do this.

She takes HER treat normally with no problem, then goes under furniture to hide to eat it. If one of the cats happen to go under the furniture to investigate what she's eating, then she will growl and I think nip at them. I can't see since she's under either the sofa or the bed, so I can't get down to see what she does exactly, except I know that it's not good.

But I will try the "down-stay" move when I give the cats their treat and see what she does.

Thanks
Keep us in the loop as to how this works out.

Also, most animals will protect a food source, that is normal. It is when you are handing out treats or food that aggression is NOT allowed.
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:09 AM
 
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how do you know the cats not trying to take her treat?...maybe they have before and that's why she acts like she does...I think it's perfectly understandable for her to growl abit when there's more than one cat around her, and they're all bigger than she is....it's her way of saying BACK OFF.....and I don't see it as her doing anything wrong......if she tried to take a cats treat away I'll bet it would hisssss at her....same thing.
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Texas
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What kind of dog is this?

Sounds like a little dog.
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:55 PM
 
Location: On Earth
399 posts, read 579,755 times
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She's a miniture Chiweenie. Have mini dashuand, half chihuahua. Yes, the cats have gone over to sniff at what she eats all the time but I push the cats away and they go. So it's a fight between the two breeds -- cat vs dog but I don't want the dog to go biting on the cats if that should come down to it.

I want my dog to be more passive when it comes to her treats that they are hers and the cats aren't going to take them and then when I give the cats treats that they are the cats and not hers.

If that all makes sense. LOL



Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
What kind of dog is this?

Sounds like a little dog.
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Old 09-11-2012, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Southern California
748 posts, read 984,269 times
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I taught my dogs the "gentle" command. I use it all the time, along with the word "baby" I first introduced gentle with squeeky toys. They would play gentle and careful with them and not rip the squeekers out. I also used gentle around children, so they did not run up and push one over while giving a smell.

And I use gentle when I am feeding treats. I hold the treat in my hand in a way that they need to be gentle and careful or they will get my fingers. Sometimes when they are excited and both of them are there, they will jump up and snap at the treat, so gentle tells them to go slow, be careful.

Too bad cats can't be trained like dogs can. I think that would kind of be cool.
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Old 09-11-2012, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Texas
42,222 posts, read 49,768,169 times
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The little dogs tend to be, in my experience, more threatened more easily when these things happen.
You have to pay attention and work on them calmly preserving personal space and not being food aggressive.
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