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Old 01-30-2013, 01:47 PM
 
322 posts, read 795,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dashdog View Post
We have a lot of coyotes here and I often see one or a couple when the dogs and I walk . Even a mom and her 4 pups trotted past us one day they just looked at us as they trotted by. When Jazz was young and I use to walk her ( on leash) at a local little lake that has wilderness trails around it a young coyote use to walk with us most mornings. She would stay a few feet away but follow us around the lake. She looked to be about the same age as Jazz and I heard tales from people that walked dogs off leash saying their dogs would chase her then she would chase them just like two dogs playing. One day she was gone and a few months later Jazz pulled me off the trail and near some bushes in all the over grown grass/weeds there was a decaying body of a small coyote most of it was skeleton by then. Jazz sort of freaked out when we got near it so I figured it was our little walking buddy and someone or some thing killed it. People that live near the lake were known to kill the coyotes. I myself do not mind them but I have always had dogs that are as big if not bigger then a coyote and we have never been threatened by any of them.

I wonder if that pack of coyotes in the Chicago area were starving to do what they did?
Most coyotes hunt in packs. If the coyote you speak of was by herself, perhaps she got separated from her pack and was looking to you and your dog as a new pack?
Unfortunately, not all coyotes are as friendly as the one you described. My inlaws have a farm, and every night they have to put the chickens in the henhouse and their barn cat inside to make sure they don't get to them. One of their neighbors lost a cat to them a couple ofyears ago. Sometimes I would hear the pack of them barking and howling as they head out for the night. A little eerie.
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:06 PM
 
Location: zone 5
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I think I've posted this before, but a woman in a town near me had a pit bull who was mauled by 2 coyotes last summer. They don't generally seem to mess with the big dogs but it can happen.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LIGuyandGal View Post
Most coyotes hunt in packs. If the coyote you speak of was by herself, perhaps she got separated from her pack and was looking to you and your dog as a new pack?
Unfortunately, not all coyotes are as friendly as the one you described. My inlaws have a farm, and every night they have to put the chickens in the henhouse and their barn cat inside to make sure they don't get to them. One of their neighbors lost a cat to them a couple ofyears ago. Sometimes I would hear the pack of them barking and howling as they head out for the night. A little eerie.
Not true. Most coyotes hunt in pairs and urban/suburban coyotes will hunt alone. They will 'den' together in larger groups. Coyotes are predators, so yes they will try to feed on chickens, cats, mice, etc.

Again, responsible humans can limit the effect coyotes have on their pets/lifestyle.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Colorado
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Originally Posted by subject2change View Post
I think I've posted this before, but a woman in a town near me had a pit bull who was mauled by 2 coyotes last summer. They don't generally seem to mess with the big dogs but it can happen.
A woman in my town was killed by a falling bridge panel. They usually don't fall but it can happen...
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Simmering in DFW
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We see coyotes occasionally; I think they live in a small undeveloped section that borders the golf course in our community. I have stopped walking on the golf course, as I used to do with my dogs when its not being used, because a couple of times we have been followed by a coyote and I have had to scoop up my boston terrier.....I think he was the target of the stalking. Some of our neighbors let their dogs run off leash on the golf course when its closed, but not me!
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:44 AM
 
Location: zone 5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedSoxFanGoingWest View Post
A woman in my town was killed by a falling bridge panel. They usually don't fall but it can happen...
The only point I'm really making is, if your dog is out back and you see a coyote in your front yard or across the street, bring your dog in. Don't think, oh it will stay away from my dog because he's big. If you're walking your big dog and see a coyote, keep your eye on it and go the other way. Don't think, that coyote will never bother us because my dog is a pit bull. There are lots of people who would assume that.
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Old 02-01-2013, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Colorado
1,893 posts, read 3,511,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subject2change View Post
The only point I'm really making is, if your dog is out back and you see a coyote in your front yard or across the street, bring your dog in. Don't think, oh it will stay away from my dog because he's big. If you're walking your big dog and see a coyote, keep your eye on it and go the other way. Don't think, that coyote will never bother us because my dog is a pit bull. There are lots of people who would assume that.
I was just playing with ya! (Although there was a woman from my town that was sadly killed that way)

I have 5 dogs, the smallest one being as big as the typical-sized coyote. If I see or hear coyotes out I keep a very close eye on them. Most of the time my dogs bark and scare them off or chase them off the property. I agree that it is not a foregone conclusion that the coyotes won't attack a larger dog though it is highly unlikely.

(I am very passionate about this topic. I was a biology major that focused on wildlife research mainly centered around wolves & coyotes.)
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Old 02-01-2013, 07:37 AM
 
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What drives the human/coyote problem is that suburbs have steadily moved out into coyote habitat areas, so coyotes are displaced and there's more interaction. We are going to be living with this for a long time.
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Old 02-01-2013, 08:47 AM
 
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Coyotes are getting bolder in San Diego CT, there are several stories recently of them coming into people's backyards and taking their smaller dogs. The other evening there apparently was a standoff between a couple of 'yoties and one of our neighborhood dogs in the park. He's a huge Newfie and stood his ground until they ran off, but it's scary to think they would even try. We're not letting our Sweetie (big brave WSD) into the area of our backyard bordering the canyon at night anymore. The coyotes are sometimes just standing at the other side of the fence, taunting her. On the lighter side, she has taken to howling with them lately! And since she's bigger, it comes out sounding more like a wolf (and we know wolf howls from Idaho!). Now that's eeerie!
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:49 AM
 
1,922 posts, read 2,617,078 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
What drives the human/coyote problem is that suburbs have steadily moved out into coyote habitat areas, so coyotes are displaced and there's more interaction. We are going to be living with this for a long time.

this is not true for the east coast of the US , coyotes
have been moving into humans space , 20 years ago no one
ever saw a coyote in NC.
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