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Old 03-12-2015, 10:20 AM
 
3,875 posts, read 2,524,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucknow View Post
kuvaszclubofamerica.org

I recommend a Kuvasz in a family situation. I just can not say enough good things about well bred examples of this breed. They are extremely healthy, long lived for a giant breed and very very good at their job of protecting everything that belongs to them. Although there are a couple of more formidable guardians like the Komondor for example, they are "Too sharp" for family pets and are working dogs only!!!!!

I have a friend who has a camp in northern Ontario for disadvantaged kids, mostly native kids. Anyway, the camp was plagued with wolves and bears. They were always coming around. He got a male Kuvasz and you should see the way this dog interacts with the kids. He is just fantastic. A couple of times a day, his tail goes up and off he goes running into the bush. In the 5 years he has been guarding the camp, not a single wolf or bear has been seen on the camp property and it's 250 acres in size. The wolves and bears just don't want to mess with him and get injured for their trouble so they just run off. I think that Pyrs are as good at their jobs as the Kuvasz but they have more health issues and their coats mat worse.
The Kuvasz breeder near me here in Ontario has the best dogs in North America. If anyone is ever interested in one just Pmail me.
I almost got a Kuvaz, they're great dogs but NOT for a novice owner. They also can be very wary of strangers. It sounds like your friend has a well socialized dog but I'd guess that his is the exception rather than the rule.
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Old 03-15-2015, 08:00 AM
 
5,787 posts, read 9,226,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 258 View Post
First of all, thank you for your compliment and for wecoming me (whas that right ? )
Ads yes, its really heartbreaking to loose your beloved dog after such a short time, but i wouldnt want to miss even those years.
And yes, there are wolfes back in Germany. We have about 15 Packs at this time ( no reintroduction as well)
and in Lower Saxony were i live for example they are becoming a problem right now , because a few alone traveling ones has been seen in a housing area, so a lot of people are quite scared.
But are you sure that the wolfes in southern Scandinavia had come from Germany? Because there is an ocean between those two countries (the baltic sea). Dont get me wrong, i dont want to upset you, im just confused.
Greeting from "the wolf country"
258

Not much ocean between western Denmark (Jutland) and Germany! You can walk across the border, and the wolves do. Sweden is different, and is indeed separated from Germany by the Baltic Sea, but Denmark is also Southern Scandinavia.
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Old 11-26-2015, 11:23 PM
 
1 posts, read 592 times
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Default Irish Wolfhound vs Wolf

Actually the original Irish Wolfhounds were used to hunt, run down and dispatch a wolf. History reports that they were so successful they cleared all the wolves out of Ireland. With the wolves gone there was no need for the IW. It was reported this breed became extinct. In the mid to late 1800s an English Captain Graham reintroduced the IW but he had to use Scottish Deerhounds to accomplish his project.

We have owned 6 IWs. Our largest male was 190# and 36" at the shoulders. My wife showed this dog so we saw a lot of the IWs in the SE. There was a male in Chapel Hill that made my male look small. He was a pet not a show dog. His head was about as long as that of an Alligator and probably could have been fierce in a fight.

We had friends in Montana that invited us to come out. We hunted our IW to chase coyotes for the ranchers. He could catch a coyote with no problem but for some reason would not dispatch everyone. We used two large Airedales with him, so if he bayed a coyote they would dispatch the coyote upon arrival.

Several people have mentioned about wolves traveling / hunting in a pack so one of the better LGDs or even a pair would have a problem. Personally, I hate dog fighting. I understand some breeders especially in Turkey and Russia do this to ensure the strongest are allowed to breed. Others have mentioned the duties of the dog and the dog being dedicated to their job of Live Stock Guardian nothing else. It has also been mentioned that LGDs need to have a human close by, I totally agree.

There are also documented cases when a pack of wolves would follow / chase archery hunters out of the woods. Some of these hunters reported that they lived only because they had handguns that they fired to keep the wolves at bay.

Sadly anyone protecting their live stock needs to know what force can be used with regard to state and federal laws pertaining to wolves.
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Old 11-30-2015, 09:27 AM
 
Location: DC
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Great Pyrenees or a Komondor would good dogs to hold there own against wolves, but as someone else said 4-5 on 1 still doesn't work.
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Old 11-30-2015, 10:52 AM
 
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This is an older thread originally but breeds like Caucasian Ovcharka, Kangal or a Sarplaninac.

There is an old video of a Sar dispatching a pack of wolves.

Taigans are also used for wolf hunting.
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Old 02-22-2017, 10:44 PM
 
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Hi
I have owned a number of Irish wolf hounds over the years and a previous response is correct .The Irish wolfhound of today is a shadow of it's former self ,you would need to re breed the IWH to it's former task .In Ireland in the late 1700's a male Irish wolf hound puppy 3 months old was placed in a cage with an irish wolf of the same age initially they got along in the first year playing etc after the second year the wolf would try and dominate and steal all the food .By the 3rd year they constantly fought , other wise keeping away from each other ,then finally the Irish wolf hound killed the wolf .
The caucasian shepherd is a wolf killer in it's home territory but the caucasian wolf is no where near the size of a Canadian wolf .Again in Georgia [the country ] the caucasian shepherd or Georgian mountain dog is placed with the flock as a puppy and bonds with them and protects them from predators but there will be up to a dozen dogs protecting a large flock from predators .
The Kangal with the spiked collar is probably the best but again you would have 2 or 3 Kangals against 3 or 4 wolves .The spiked metal collars stops the wolf attacking the dogs throat and also the dogs ears are cut short when they are pups to stop the wolves holding onto them while another wolf goes in for the kill
There is another form of the Kangal called the Boz Shepherd which again if equipped with with the spiked collar would easily take down a wolf one on one but definately would not cope with a pack of wolves you would again need to 2 or 3 Boz Shepherds they are now available from breeders in the US
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Old 07-28-2017, 07:45 AM
 
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Oregonwoodsmoke is wrong about the Irish wolfhounds .They came close to extinction but there was still enough of the breed left in Ireland to rebuild with .The English used to send to Ireland to try and buy Irish wolfhounds to send back to England but the Irish dislike of the British ,saw them selling allsorts of mixed breed large dogs and calling them wolf hounds for a tidy profit ,the English returning to England with his new rare trophy while the remaining Irish wolfhounds were kept in Ireland.Captain Graham was correct to use Glengarry Deerhounds as they were true to there origins and had not been crossed with other breeds.The old kennel master for Glengarry stated that the odd crossing was done but these were never bred with They were brought from Ireland around 300 ad to Scotland when the Gaels of Dál Riata settled in Scotland they brought 200 hounds with them .Over time the breed was adapted to the new environment and it was suggested that many were crossed with Borzoi and a new breed the Sloughi was introduced, around 600 were imported into England after the laws were changed to stop poaching.
I have owned many Irish wolf hounds and it is true they have had the aggression bred out of them for the last 200 years and it would take may generations of breeding to get the aggression back into the breed .They would have to be put back to work ,as I have seen in Australia where there are some being used on wild razorback pigs with great success .
I currently own a Central Asian Shepherd and I would agree 3 or 4 of these or Anatolian Shepherds and Caucasian Shepherd [Georgian Shepherd ] that come from working lines but against a pack of wolves no way .One on one definately
In the old days, farmers in the Caucasus of various breeds like the Gampr ,Georgian shepherd and other local breeds every 7 or 8 generation was back bred with wolves and they would not use the first generation but would use them for breeding till the wolf blood was diluted and they would then pick out dogs from the litters that would be suited as wolf killers .While the others pups were used as guardians to the flock .
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Old 04-22-2018, 06:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie1 View Post
They were only bred to TRACK not Kill a Wolf... Thats up to the person with a gun! Plus 1 dog against a Pack of wolves....
Best is good High fence with 8-12 burried & YOU keeping a watch.
That is totally incorrect. I raised Irish wolfhounds for years on a 480-acre farm. They are a gaze hound, not a scent hound. In other words, they do not track animals down. They hunt by sight and have a very high prey drive. Wolfhounds can outrun a wolf and, despite the wolves’ formidable strength and bite, overpower it and kill it.

But, that said, the original questioner doesn't need an Irish wolfhound. The prey drive has NOT been bred out of them as someone said, though and in fact and unfortunately, turned loose would be as likely as any wolf to run down a deer. They're great guard dogs from the standpoint of size as a deterrent, who wants to take a chance with a 200 pound dog that can touch his nose to an 8-ft ceiling? But, they're generally gentle and friendly to people. However, when the occasion arises, so does the wolfhound. When a green broke stallion threatened me in one day, one of our males flew over the corral fence and took him down and held him on the ground until I was safely out of there.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:31 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
13,742 posts, read 18,622,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdeleInTexas View Post
That is totally incorrect. I raised Irish wolfhounds for years on a 480-acre farm. They are a gaze hound, not a scent hound. In other words, they do not track animals down. They hunt by sight and have a very high prey drive. Wolfhounds can outrun a wolf and, despite the wolves’ formidable strength and bite, overpower it and kill it.

But, that said, the original questioner doesn't need an Irish wolfhound. The prey drive has NOT been bred out of them as someone said, though and in fact and unfortunately, turned loose would be as likely as any wolf to run down a deer. They're great guard dogs from the standpoint of size as a deterrent, who wants to take a chance with a 200 pound dog that can touch his nose to an 8-ft ceiling? But, they're generally gentle and friendly to people. However, when the occasion arises, so does the wolfhound. When a green broke stallion threatened me in one day, one of our males flew over the corral fence and took him down and held him on the ground until I was safely out of there.

I myself had a irish wolfhound and that dog loved me to bits and I was living by myself at the time and some fool came to my door and that dog backed him down real quick and left my door pronto / they are and can be Velcro dogs for a reason and their main goal in life is to protect their owner and any threats made to the owner . Including wild animals . my male was a good whopping 160 .
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Old 04-23-2018, 12:16 PM
Status: "Last night I saw Lester Maddox on a TV show" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,253 posts, read 21,697,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
People never cease to amaze me...
need more wolves
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