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Old 02-07-2013, 10:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akck View Post
Our vet said that it would likely return after draining it and the only way to get rid of it would be to remove it completely under general anesthesia. I had it drained because of my wife's and one son's concern and the cyst filled back up. Our vet said if our GR ever goes in for some other surgery, that would be the time to remove it.
Yes, that's what happens with sebaceous cysts. The sac that contains the sebaceous content must be scraped away and then the area is packed to keep it from redeveloping. Getting it removed at a time when you need something else done is a good idea. One of our dogs had one at the base of her tail, an area our vet said was very dicey for removal because of all the nerve endings that converge there. So we drained it -- and unfortunately it just kept draining and making a mess of her "pants" for the rest of her life. We never could get it to heal back up.
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Old 02-07-2013, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
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Lance it and drain it.
I have one dog that seams to get them, when the others don't.

They do come back.
but, if you get lucky the capsule will come out when you express the cyst.
and it will go away.

Then some times you can change their food and they will subside.


They can get a really large sack of puss if they don't drain on there own or if you don't lance them. This will require a visit to the vet.
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Old 02-07-2013, 12:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam I Am View Post
Why did you have the dog evaluated by the second vet - was it because of this little place or something else? Is it possible it is a piece of foreign material that got under the skin and has built up some scar tissue around it? How deep under the skin is it?

I panic over lumps after losing so many Rotties to cancer. My vet has to talk me down off the ledge every so often when I find an unidentified area on one of my crew. I trust his opinion implicitly, which is not to say I wouldn't overrule him and see someone else if I wasn't comfortable with his diagnosis :-) Is your dog's breed one that is prone to cancers?

I'm with Subject2change - a human needle biopsy is pretty conclusive unless they miss the spot they are trying to aspirate completely. I'd be inclined to watch it some more, although sebaceous cysts can grow as well. And are really, really yucky but not dangerous.

I guess it comes down to the faith you have in the two vets. From your description it sounds like the second vet was being a wee bit dramatic.

With an older dog, I'm just always cautious about anesthesia. I'd want to know how long it will take to excise this thing and consider the general overall health of my pet. I'm sure the first vet, if that's the one you trust, would be willing to remove it even if he thinks you're being a nervous Nellie. If it's a quick fix it may be best to have it removed and put your mind at rest - if it's deep and will require a lot more anesthesia and time, I'm not sure I'd rush in.

Well. There you have it. That is absolutely no advice at all, really, is it? LOL! Go with your gut, K9, that's the best advice I have.
I have 2 main vets for my dogs. One is a "city vet" with all the latest fancy equipment, a dentist and an ophthalmologist on staff, you get the picture. The other is a "country vet" with a lot of common sense, decades of experience, and very reasonable prices. I also occasionally have my dogs seen by a holistic vet who does house calls, just for the convenience and a different perspective. So for the lump, my first choice was to bring my dog to the country vet because I knew it would be something he's seen a million times before. He was pretty sure it was a sebaceous cyst just by feeling it, and then the needle aspiration confirmed it. A couple months later I had my dog at the city vet for some routine tests and I let her know about the lump and the results of the aspiration. That's when she pressured me to have it removed immediately. She's a "do everything" kind of vet, not the type to "wait and see". I often feel pressured by her, but she is extremely smart / educated so I do value her opinions..

This dog with the lump is a 9 year old Border-Jack (Border Collie - JRT). She was just under anesthesia a little over a year ago for a molar tooth extraction. At that time, the lump was not yet present, otherwise I likely would have had it removed while she was already having surgery. I would hate to have her put under again now unless this lump is truly dangerous. The lump is right under the skin, not deep.
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Old 02-07-2013, 03:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k9coach View Post
I have 2 main vets for my dogs. One is a "city vet" with all the latest fancy equipment, a dentist and an ophthalmologist on staff, you get the picture. The other is a "country vet" with a lot of common sense, decades of experience, and very reasonable prices. I also occasionally have my dogs seen by a holistic vet who does house calls, just for the convenience and a different perspective. So for the lump, my first choice was to bring my dog to the country vet because I knew it would be something he's seen a million times before. He was pretty sure it was a sebaceous cyst just by feeling it, and then the needle aspiration confirmed it. A couple months later I had my dog at the city vet for some routine tests and I let her know about the lump and the results of the aspiration. That's when she pressured me to have it removed immediately. She's a "do everything" kind of vet, not the type to "wait and see". I often feel pressured by her, but she is extremely smart / educated so I do value her opinions..

This dog with the lump is a 9 year old Border-Jack (Border Collie - JRT). She was just under anesthesia a little over a year ago for a molar tooth extraction. At that time, the lump was not yet present, otherwise I likely would have had it removed while she was already having surgery. I would hate to have her put under again now unless this lump is truly dangerous. The lump is right under the skin, not deep.
I also have a 9 year old who came with 2 bumps and has since had multiples spring up. All were aspirated, none of concern per the vet. I also have more than one main vet (big city/country too!) and both of them agree that unless one of these aspirated bumps changes in shape, size or behavior, let them alone. Since the last bump check, he now has 2 more, and also needs his teeth cleaned, and we are at the debate stage of which way to go for our dog as well.

Pro: I would like them all gone because I know that only way to know what is in that entire bump is to remove it and let the path lab tell me. That said, aspirations are a very good and way less intrusive means of achieving the same result, though both of my vets agreed that it is possible that the result of an aspiration could be less than 100% accurate though that is rare. Whereas if you remove it, if the asp. is wrong, at least the malignancy was removed and you can then proceed to do further treatment if needed.

Con: I have to balance things esp. with older dogs. If I had every bump/lump removed at the rate he is starting to grow them, my older dog would undergo anesthesia every month or better to keep up (turns out he is very bumpy boy). That creates its own set of risks for an old guy, esp. for bumps that are benign and those that may come right back. And also it is no way for him to live a good life if I do this for every single non life threatening bump.

I'd get a third opinion as a tie breaker unless you feel 100% okay with the diagnosis (and since you posted this question here, you probably are uneasy. Which I would be as well). I did that once, and unlike the first 2, the third vet discovered the bump was malignant and it saved my dog's life. Though that doesn't happen often, things like that make it hard for me to tell you to not worry, even though this your experience may not play out the same way at all. Use your instinct on this.

Is there another vet in the big city practice who you could use for that 3rd opinion? I don't know if you can get the certainty you need either to leave it or remove it, but you have my sympathies - been there, done that, still there, deciding.....
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Old 02-07-2013, 04:14 PM
 
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Speaking of having an older dog go under anesthesia, I want to urge you to consider this. Before doing it, don't just get bloodwork done. Get radiographis and a urinalysis. Last year, both of our teenaged dogs -- BOTH of them -- were found to have splenic masses. The discoveries were both the result of them having been in for dentals. If we had known about the masses beforehand, their teeth and lumps wouldn't have been a concern at all. One turned out to be a large benign hematoma. The other dog aspirated under sedation, developed pneumonia, and succumbed to the combination of the splenic mass and the pneumonia.

So nine months later, the dog that had the hematoma on his spleen had to have several teeth removed because of a serious dental problem called CUPS. We got a very specialized dental vet to do a consultation, and his policy is to get complete blood chem, urinalysis and radiographs on all dogs he does work on. So we went back to our vet and got our Jimmy x-rayed.

He had a tumor on his lung. So we waited a couple weeks and had it x-rayed again. This time we wanted films of his hips because he was suddenly very crippled. The vet found bone cancer in his spine. So that day, two days after Christmas, we had to let him go, and it was devastating. But I was so relieved we hadn't put him through the agony of getting all those teeth pulled without finding out he had a terminal illness.
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Old 02-07-2013, 04:26 PM
 
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Adding to my last post, on the day Jimmy died, his bloodwork was the most perfect of his life. Every single value was spot on. I had always put so much stock in bloodwork as an indicator of health. Talk about irony.
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Old 02-07-2013, 05:05 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
Adding to my last post, on the day Jimmy died, his bloodwork was the most perfect of his life. Every single value was spot on. I had always put so much stock in bloodwork as an indicator of health. Talk about irony.
Oh poor Jimmy, and the same thing happened with our Max. Your ideas raise some issues that I am going to reflect upon, thanks for adding that.

9 is a bit borderline for me on the "old age" front, which is why I'm debating. But our Max was 15.5 when we learned that his "arthritis" that was being treated was actually advanced bone cancer. His bloodwork? Excellent, even there at the specialist's office.

As was the bloodwork for my elderly pointer just prior to and for quite some time during her last cancer bout. I still have bloodwork drawn if the vet wishes to do so, but like you, I don't see it as definitive in all cases. It never was that but I didn't understand that fact. I do now.
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Old 02-07-2013, 08:04 PM
 
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Sugar, we had always thought Jimmy's problem was solely arthritis too. He had it bad, which probably masked the cancer until his legs gave out. I am kicking myself, because we had him on so many painkillers and joint supplements, and I took him for physical therapy and laser treatments every week. From now on, we're going to get pictures of what's inside our dogs, because they suffered needlessly -- and our bank account took a major hit, too.
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Old 03-27-2017, 11:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k9coach View Post
My 9 year old dog has had a hard little lump behind her ear for several months (about half the size of a pea). I had the vet aspirate it, and the results indicated that it is just a sebaceous cyst. However, another vet who examined my dog insists it should be removed because it could be something serious. She was quite dismissive of the needle aspiration results and told me if it were her own dog, she'd want the lump removed immediately.

I check the lump regularly and so far it has not changed size, shape, or firmness. The weird thing is I swear it has moved a tiny bit lower from where I originally found it.

So what would you do if it was your dog? Keep monitoring and have it removed if anything changes? Get a third opinion from another vet? Just go ahead with surgery? Anyone ever have a similar experience with a lump like this? I know one thing.. I'll be pretty upset if I have this thing removed and it really was just basically a pimple..
How is your dog doin?i just found my dog has a small cyst or lump on her right ear
Went the vets , the first vet said it should remove the second vet dr says should biosy
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Old 03-28-2017, 09:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Amy1799 View Post
How is your dog doin?i just found my dog has a small cyst or lump on her right ear
Went the vets , the first vet said it should remove the second vet dr says should biosy
OP is from 2013 and hasn't been back. How his dog is doing isn't really relevant to your situation.

If two vets who have looked at it recommend biopsy or removal, I would do one or the other. It's been my experience that a vet won't recommend either unless the bump looks suspicious. If it were my dog, I'd just go ahead or remove it. I
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