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Old 03-21-2013, 08:21 PM
 
485 posts, read 847,128 times
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So the first dog I adopted years ago was a Basset Hound (5 years old) from a rescue group. It growled at my face and tried to bite me so I returned it to the rescue group. No problem.

The second dog I adopted (Border Collie mix, 1 year old at time of adoption) was from the local shelter and he was a wonderful dog (extremely affectionate, very smart, never aggressive toward me) but he was extremely stranger- and dog-aggressive, which meant that I lived an isolated life for 13 years because I could never EVER have people come to my house or go hang out with people with dogs. That dog is now deceased. If a plumber came to my house the dog had to be locked in a room and he would bark and growl for hours b/c he could hear the plumber/stranger in the house.

Now I have adopted my third dog and this dog, also a Border Collie mix, also 1 year old, is very affectionate and energetic.

HOWEVER, in the one whole week I have had him in my house, he has:

1. Growled at female vet and vet tech, tried to bite them, even when muzzled he was still growling and trying to bite.

2. Growled at handyman who came to my house and barked at him. Had to lock dog in room.

3. Growled and barked at my 30-something male cousin who came to visit (mind you, he was fine with my cousin the day before at his house, but in my house, the dog went bonkers).

4. Growled at the lady in the Dunkin Donuts drive-thru today for no reason (from behind closed car window).


Do I just happen to be attracted to dogs with secret aggression problems? Am I an idiot? Despite this dog being wonderful in every other way (housebroken, non-chewer, affectionate, etc.), I just cannot see myself going through another 13 years of panic (out of fear my dog will bite someone) and isolation. What do I do?
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:00 PM
 
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It's because you are attracted to Border Collies. Don't get me wrong, I love border collies. I was raised with them. We had five. They can be protective of their territory against strangers. That would explain why he behaved at the cousins house but not when the cousin visited your house. It ranks 7th out of the top 10 aggressive breeds. Bassets aren't generally aggressive so that might be a freak thing due to abuse or he was testing you. Take your own personality into consideration. If you're not a strong and consistent leader, your dogs will misbehave.

Last edited by Hopes; 03-21-2013 at 09:56 PM..
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:05 PM
 
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Top 10 Most Aggressive Dog Breeds
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:09 PM
 
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Border Collies require strong dominant leaders. Start reading on how to be a healthy strong leader. Get into training classes with professionals.
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:11 PM
 
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Why did I not know this? THANK YOU.

Is there a very smart and affectionate dog breed that is medium sized (30-50 lbs) and NOT aggressive?
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:23 PM
 
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Unfortunately, some rescue animals are surrendered by their owners for aggression, some animals have been abused as well. Unfortunately, the pet owner don't share that with the rescue groups.

I have a child who was biten by 2 dogs we rescued.

But others have been great additions to the family.

If you have room a Great Pyrenees is a wonderful dog. Gentle giants. We had to put Winnie down last December. Rough Christmas
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by planedition View Post
Is there a very smart and affectionate dog breed that is medium sized (30-50 lbs) and NOT aggressive?
The smarter the dog, the stronger of a leader the owner needs to be.

I'm going to do some research for something in your size range.

I have many great suggestions, most are bigger, but I want to verify a few things.
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:38 PM
 
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With any breed, there's always going to be a risk. Training and socializing is important. Make sure you get into a training class early. Socialize often with other dogs and people and many different environments and situations. You also need to handle your dog regularly----looking it its mouth and ears and such so it's comfortable with people doing that when it goes to the vet.

A cocker spaniel is a mid size dog that weighs about 30 lbs. They are nonaggressive, very affectionate and friendly dogs.

A greyhound is a bigger in height but in your pound range. They are very nonaggressive, affectionate, and calm dogs.

Those are my top two for your specifications.

There are some terriers that qualify, but I'm skeptical of terriers because I've met quite a few who were passive aggressive.

If you're willing to go bigger or smaller, I have many more recommendations.
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:40 PM
 
Location: US
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Dogs from shelters were often abused, neglected and/or not trained. This is why many are scared of strangers. Too many people think it is based on breeds. It's ridiculus, changing from dog to dog to dog thinking it is the breed's fault (I'm not saying this about the OP). Breeds do play a slight role, but it really comes down to nurture instead of nature, just like in humans.
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:43 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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When a dog is joining a new "pack" i.e. family, boundaries must be established. The dogs are simply testing your Alpha status. There are ways of asserting your rank without damaging an already-damaged dog. There are books out there. Buy one.

20yrsinBranson
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