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Old 10-03-2013, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
2,776 posts, read 6,964,466 times
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My 2 year old Vizsla recently had an adverse reaction to something, starting with hives, then later, pupil dilation and tremors (and/or seizure). He had been in and out all day, for the most part supervised, so no accidental ingestion of poisons or such. But he did have his regular dose of Heartgard Plus that afternoon. He has had the medication before, in fact, he had an episode of consuming a whole package, 6 tabs last year with no ill effects.
After a midnight ride to the emergency vet we determined that he was stable and responding well to Benadryl. There is the outside chance that he may have been stung by a bee or wasp, but I can think of no other allergen he may have encountered other than the Heartgard administered a few hours earlier.
Now I am on the fence about giving him his usual dose in 30 days or going with an ivermectin alternative. The vet was not convinced of the medication being suspect, but she did suggest the choice is mine...either way under closer scrutiny.
I know of certain breeds like collies, Australian sheperds, and some other breeds having a genetic mutation that can cause this reaction. Any other dog owners encounter this effect?
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Old 10-03-2013, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
4,520 posts, read 9,607,700 times
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Vets can run a MDR1 test and then you would know. Dazzle is a Silken windhound and they can have issues With ivermectin so all the breeders test the puppies so when you get one you know. Dazzle is MDR1 negative
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Old 10-03-2013, 11:35 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
20,998 posts, read 25,737,156 times
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There is a genetic screening test for ivermectin sensitivity. I suggest that you pay and have it done.

The dog needs his heartworm meds and the non-ivermectin ones are pricey and less effective. You can go that route, but better to not if the ivermectin is not the problem.
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:35 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
13,341 posts, read 10,898,841 times
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One must be careful with worming medicines. They are powerful drugs. Ivermectin is a common one, used across the board, for all types of animals, in varying strengths and catalysts. It's better safe than sorry if you suspect a reaction. There are alternative treatments should your animal prove to be intolerant of it. Worming is more in depth than a lot of folks realize. It pays to be sure. :-)
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:44 AM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,175,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dashdog View Post
Vets can run a MDR1 test and then you would know. Dazzle is a Silken windhound and they can have issues With ivermectin so all the breeders test the puppies so when you get one you know. Dazzle is MDR1 negative
We had the MDRI test done on Jimmy and Hallie years ago, and they were both negative. I believe we sent the swabs off to Washington State University. I was especially concerned about Jimmy since he appeared to have a good deal of collie in him.
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Old 10-05-2013, 09:16 AM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 19,765,259 times
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generally any of the sighthounds and any of the herding group in general (collies, aussies, sheperds, ect)
dobes and Danes can also be sensitive.
ANY bred however can have the mutate gene, when in doubt, test,its not expensive
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Old 10-05-2013, 10:00 AM
 
10,608 posts, read 13,373,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
My 2 year old Vizsla recently had an adverse reaction to something, starting with hives, then later, pupil dilation and tremors (and/or seizure). He had been in and out all day, for the most part supervised, so no accidental ingestion of poisons or such. But he did have his regular dose of Heartgard Plus that afternoon. He has had the medication before, in fact, he had an episode of consuming a whole package, 6 tabs last year with no ill effects.
After a midnight ride to the emergency vet we determined that he was stable and responding well to Benadryl. There is the outside chance that he may have been stung by a bee or wasp, but I can think of no other allergen he may have encountered other than the Heartgard administered a few hours earlier.
Now I am on the fence about giving him his usual dose in 30 days or going with an ivermectin alternative. The vet was not convinced of the medication being suspect, but she did suggest the choice is mine...either way under closer scrutiny.
I know of certain breeds like collies, Australian sheperds, and some other breeds having a genetic mutation that can cause this reaction. Any other dog owners encounter this effect?
Absoultely.

My megaesophagus board has endless stories my own Bulldog included. He was overdosed with it and suffered the consequences when we were "trying" to fix his skin. I say overdosed in retrospect because I never would have followed that treatment if I had known the risks.

We never could PROVE if the Ivermectin caused the problem or vice versa but generally we blame it. In my dog's case it was because he had an underlying H Pylori bacteria that most beings carry but it doesn't cause much problem until our resistance goes down (like with Ivermectin overdose) then it becomes extremely aggressive. It caused him gastric bleeding ulcers, vomiting then mega-e. MANY MONTHS after he stopped the Ivermectin treatment. I stipulate he was on other things too, like long term antibiotics that didn't help the situation. This was a case of me chasing perfection instead of just letting him be borderline "cured".

Our members used Safeheart, a lower dose product and didn't give the full dose all at once. Under their vet's guidance.

My guess is his adverse reaction stems from his digesting that whole package. Sometimes the adverse reaction resolves and sometimes it doesn't. But they are always SUSPECT thereafter IMO and IME.

THAT is the type of linkage we see anecdotally all the time on our board.
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