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Old 06-24-2014, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Beautiful place in Virginia
2,658 posts, read 10,456,000 times
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When he eats, he spins, he looks to make sure we haven't left him, and then he goes back to eating. He's a beautiful little guy. Some dogs are like a shadow. He's like a second skin. Hahaha.
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Old 06-24-2014, 09:29 PM
 
13,349 posts, read 7,335,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by titaniummd View Post
When he eats, he spins, he looks to make sure we haven't left him, and then he goes back to eating. He's a beautiful little guy. Some dogs are like a shadow. He's like a second skin. Hahaha.
Yaaaay! He is a lucky little guy...he hit the jackpot with his forever home.

Do you have any pictures yet???
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Old 06-24-2014, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Lone Star State to Peach State
3,796 posts, read 3,488,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by titaniummd View Post
When he eats, he spins, he looks to make sure we haven't left him, and then he goes back to eating. He's a beautiful little guy. Some dogs are like a shadow. He's like a second skin. Hahaha.
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Old 06-24-2014, 10:38 PM
 
100 posts, read 71,357 times
Reputation: 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by titaniummd View Post
We rescued a sweet little toy poodle or poodle/Maltese mix. He's a sweet little guy. However, he seems timid. He shakes if there's a loud noise. If we are sitting down, he will crawl under our hand so that he gets petted. I don't think he's ever walked on a leash. He always wants to sit on our lap or be carried. When you come to him from a standing position, he immediately goes to the ground on all fours.

I just gave him a bah, and he was calm as could be. Of course I was talking to him, and petting him as I did it.

He's quiet. He doesn't bark. He isn't aggressive. He isn't destructive.

He acted like this in his prior home. He was bullied by another dog. Prior to the last home, he was shuttled from one home to the next.

We all have the patience to help him adjust. My wife and mother are home all day. We have another rescue but he's so carefree. He isn't aggressive or jealous.

Will it just take time before he adjusts? How long does that take? Would those "calming vests" help his anxiety?

Thank you in advance.
Ohh what a great actionˇˇˇ Thanks for give him a home.
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Old 07-01-2014, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Over yonder a piece
3,897 posts, read 4,615,603 times
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I don't want to hijack someone else's thread, but we are having a similar issue.

We adopted a rescue this past weekend. Most likely a Catahoula/Corgi mix, somewhere around 2-3 years old and 45 pounds. His Petfinder description read like a dream: relaxed dog, likes other dogs, good with cats and kids, housetrained, just wants to be loved.

Sign me up!

Sure enough, he is completely housetrained. He acknowledged the cat as alpha upon arrival (much to her satisfaction). He is okay with my loud, rambunctious kids running around the house. He and the other dog have played well. He loves taking a good nap.

But it turns out he wants to be loved 24/7. The minute someone starts to pet Logan, he won't let the person stop. The result is that Logan accidently scratched both my son (a 6" red line on his leg) and my daughter (her face - right near her eye) in an attempt to get them to resume petting once they stopped. He wasn't super aggressive about it, just trying to tell them he wanted more.

Also, if I even approach my other dog (also a rescue) to give him some loving, Logan will get in between us and not let me even try to pet the other dog.

For the past three days the only way our original dog was able to get some uninterrupted petting was to follow us upstairs, because Logan is petrified of going upstairs (no idea why).

How do I get this dog to realize that there are boundaries? I know it has been only three days, and I'm willing to be somewhat patient and train him. I've been saying "down" and "off" when he jumps up or gets in my face in his demand to be petted. This morning I was trying to put on my socks and it took TEN TRIES before he knew I was not going to pet him and that he needed to stop jumping on me in order to get me to pet him. Once I had my socks on I said, "Okay, c'mon," and scratched his head for a couple minutes before I headed out for work.

In a nutshell I need Logan to learn that 1) I'm the alpha, 2) he is loved, 3) I'm not going to abandon him, 4) there's a time and place for petting, 5) jumping up or touching a person's face is unacceptable, and 6) the other dog deserves affection too.

I'm not sure I'm up to the task, to be honest. Our other rescue (an older Aussie that we got 7 months ago) is a dream dog. No issues, and fit right into our family's makeup from day one. What are some basic ways I can adjust Logan's behavior and make him less demanding about being petted?
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Old 07-01-2014, 12:45 PM
 
1,699 posts, read 3,535,834 times
Reputation: 3905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Girl View Post
I don't want to hijack someone else's thread, but we are having a similar issue.

We adopted a rescue this past weekend. Most likely a Catahoula/Corgi mix, somewhere around 2-3 years old and 45 pounds. His Petfinder description read like a dream: relaxed dog, likes other dogs, good with cats and kids, housetrained, just wants to be loved.

Sign me up!

Sure enough, he is completely housetrained. He acknowledged the cat as alpha upon arrival (much to her satisfaction). He is okay with my loud, rambunctious kids running around the house. He and the other dog have played well. He loves taking a good nap.

But it turns out he wants to be loved 24/7. The minute someone starts to pet Logan, he won't let the person stop. The result is that Logan accidently scratched both my son (a 6" red line on his leg) and my daughter (her face - right near her eye) in an attempt to get them to resume petting once they stopped. He wasn't super aggressive about it, just trying to tell them he wanted more.

Also, if I even approach my other dog (also a rescue) to give him some loving, Logan will get in between us and not let me even try to pet the other dog.

For the past three days the only way our original dog was able to get some uninterrupted petting was to follow us upstairs, because Logan is petrified of going upstairs (no idea why).

How do I get this dog to realize that there are boundaries? I know it has been only three days, and I'm willing to be somewhat patient and train him. I've been saying "down" and "off" when he jumps up or gets in my face in his demand to be petted. This morning I was trying to put on my socks and it took TEN TRIES before he knew I was not going to pet him and that he needed to stop jumping on me in order to get me to pet him. Once I had my socks on I said, "Okay, c'mon," and scratched his head for a couple minutes before I headed out for work.

In a nutshell I need Logan to learn that 1) I'm the alpha, 2) he is loved, 3) I'm not going to abandon him, 4) there's a time and place for petting, 5) jumping up or touching a person's face is unacceptable, and 6) the other dog deserves affection too.

I'm not sure I'm up to the task, to be honest. Our other rescue (an older Aussie that we got 7 months ago) is a dream dog. No issues, and fit right into our family's makeup from day one. What are some basic ways I can adjust Logan's behavior and make him less demanding about being petted?
Get rid of this silly idea about being "alpha". This is about clear communication in a language the dog understands.

Dogs do what works. If being polite always earns him attention and petting, he will catch on that being polite is the way to get what he wants. If being rude never ever results in attention of any kind, he'll figure out that rude behavior simply does not work. (And remember, saying "no no, bad dog, down, off, off, down" is giving attention.) Any rude behavior should result in the end of interaction from you. Think of it like you are a robot and when he does that truly rude "pet me NOW" behavior it is like pushing a button on you that makes you automatically ignore the dog. Ignoring might often include walking away and separating yourself for a MINUTE, but the ignoring has no emotion attached to it so therefor no scolding. People are usually pretty good at remembering to address unwanted behavior, but they are often not so great about remembering to reinforce the behaviors we do want. So focus on catching and rewarding appropriate behavior. Pet when he's polite, ignore and separate when he's being demanding and rude. He'll catch on - if rude stops working, he'll stop being rude.

Congratulations on your new addition to the family!
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Old 07-01-2014, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Over yonder a piece
3,897 posts, read 4,615,603 times
Reputation: 6230
I don't think it's a silly idea regarding alpha. I've seen it played out in my house. We had a cat who was definitely the alpha - the other cats, the dog, and all the humans (except me) fell in line. Result? The cat hated me because I wouldn't take her guff.

The cat we have left after all these years was the lowest on the totem pole her entire life - but we noticed as each other cat before her passed away, she became more confident. Now at the age of 16 she has gone from being hardly being seen at all and 100% skittish around EVERYONE (when we had a full house) to queen of her domain who is out and about and refuses to move so that we have to walk around her while she lolls on the floor.

Having seen her transformation over the past two years, I'm an absolute believer in the alpha/beta/etc. mentality for animals.

The rescue we got at the end of last year understood that from day one. He looks at me before he does anything. If my husband or the kids want the dog out of the chair so they can sit down, he won't budge. But all I have to do is say his name and he jumps right down. He knows I'm the alpha. No training needed. He just knows.

At any rate, I will definitely try your method of walking away from bad behavior and only acknowledging good behavior. Thanks,
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Beautiful place in Virginia
2,658 posts, read 10,456,000 times
Reputation: 1278
Well, it's been almost a year since we got our little friend.

It took several months before he became comfortable eating without looking to see if we have left him. He used to eat, turn around and look, and then eat. After he became more comfortable, he doesn't care if we are there to finish his meal.

Training him with a leash and collar has been challenging. He took two to three months to understand the concept, but he adapted with being consistent.

Potty training took about a month to get him to go outside. He had separation anxiety and whenever we were out of sight, he would poop or pee. Although it was a challenge, having him go when it snowed, he has done wonders being on a schedule.

He sees my wife as his main Alpha and still acts like her shadow. However, he has grown accustomed to me, and my mother. He comes to us by command, also. Speaking to him, will get a waggly tail, which I think is adorable.

He and my other rescue have adapted well. He is always chasing our first dog but our first dog is very patient. They're not aggressive towards each other. When the first dog is tired of fleeing, he'll jump onto the couch to get away.

For strangers, he tends to have a low threshold to bark, but he's not aggressive.

Coming close to the one year anniversary, there were lots of accidents in the house and growing pains with him trying to adapt. However, we have a sweet and lovable friend, despite his long history of being bounced house to house and getting neglected.

I'm proud to have him as a member of the family. I'd do a third rescue for a future pet. I'd say through this experience, we have been lucky, but patience and consistency is key.
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Old 04-29-2015, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Lake Country
1,961 posts, read 1,559,128 times
Reputation: 1801
Quote:
Originally Posted by k9coach View Post
Get rid of this silly idea about being "alpha". This is about clear communication in a language the dog understands.

Dogs do what works. If being polite always earns him attention and petting, he will catch on that being polite is the way to get what he wants. If being rude never ever results in attention of any kind, he'll figure out that rude behavior simply does not work. (And remember, saying "no no, bad dog, down, off, off, down" is giving attention.) Any rude behavior should result in the end of interaction from you. Think of it like you are a robot and when he does that truly rude "pet me NOW" behavior it is like pushing a button on you that makes you automatically ignore the dog. Ignoring might often include walking away and separating yourself for a MINUTE, but the ignoring has no emotion attached to it so therefor no scolding. People are usually pretty good at remembering to address unwanted behavior, but they are often not so great about remembering to reinforce the behaviors we do want. So focus on catching and rewarding appropriate behavior. Pet when he's polite, ignore and separate when he's being demanding and rude. He'll catch on - if rude stops working, he'll stop being rude.

Congratulations on your new addition to the family!
Couldn't rep you again...a dog/people trainer after my own heart and nicely explained. People, follow k9coach's advice!
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Old 04-30-2015, 01:01 PM
 
Location: North America
19,635 posts, read 12,385,967 times
Reputation: 8278
Quote:
Originally Posted by titaniummd View Post
Well, it's been almost a year since we got our little friend.

It took several months before he became comfortable eating without looking to see if we have left him. He used to eat, turn around and look, and then eat. After he became more comfortable, he doesn't care if we are there to finish his meal.

Training him with a leash and collar has been challenging. He took two to three months to understand the concept, but he adapted with being consistent.

Potty training took about a month to get him to go outside. He had separation anxiety and whenever we were out of sight, he would poop or pee. Although it was a challenge, having him go when it snowed, he has done wonders being on a schedule.

He sees my wife as his main Alpha and still acts like her shadow. However, he has grown accustomed to me, and my mother. He comes to us by command, also. Speaking to him, will get a waggly tail, which I think is adorable.

He and my other rescue have adapted well. He is always chasing our first dog but our first dog is very patient. They're not aggressive towards each other. When the first dog is tired of fleeing, he'll jump onto the couch to get away.

For strangers, he tends to have a low threshold to bark, but he's not aggressive.

Coming close to the one year anniversary, there were lots of accidents in the house and growing pains with him trying to adapt. However, we have a sweet and lovable friend, despite his long history of being bounced house to house and getting neglected.

I'm proud to have him as a member of the family. I'd do a third rescue for a future pet. I'd say through this experience, we have been lucky, but patience and consistency is key.

Good for you! Kudos for being patient with your pup. My 6/mo mini foxie was the same way. She was afraid of everything, and snapped at my 8 y/o Jack Russell mix. She was velcro dog for a while. I didn't reinforce it, I walked her with a harness, not a leash, and she got used to the routine. It took a couple of months, but she relaxed. I walk them both together evey day ow, and she and the Jack play constantly. In fact watching them go at it wears me out!
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