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Old 11-24-2014, 08:10 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,823 posts, read 2,402,469 times
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So we adopted Fawn last Saturday, a little over 1 week ago. She was very sweet at the shelter and they said she is great with other dogs & kids, and had no health issues. She is half boxer and half staffordshire terrier, the shelter says she is 14 months. We didn't have Nellie, our yorkie with us, so we had them bring out a little dog to play with her to see how they were together. They played a little bit and they seemed ok. So, we decided to adopt her and give it a shot. The first 2 days were ok, she was a bit shy and very sweet. Then she seemed to be right at home. She is very rambunctious and really has barely any training. Sometimes she & Nellie seem to get along, but then she gets too rambunctious and a little rough and Nellie bares her teeth and gets very defensive, which seems to egg Fawn on even more. She is GREAT after a good run, though, and my husband takes her running every day.

She has a jumping problem and nothing seems to work to keep her from jumping on us. I read that you should avoid eye contact and turn away when the dog jumps, and give praise when she is planted on the floor. Well, she now not only jumps, but typically my entire arm ends up in her mouth, and if I turn, she ends up jumping on my back & my entire leg ends up in her mouth. She's not really biting down but it still hurts. To be honest, I'm a bit frightened at times and I am a bit nervous about her & Nellie. They are never alone together and Fawn does well in a crate, which is good.

She might also have hip dysplasia. She is getting spayed in 2 weeks, and when she's under for that they are going to X ray her. I guess then we will find out if it's true & if so, how serious it is. We are planning on getting a good trainer (I already spoke w/ one who comes to your home, I feel they would be best because we can then work with both dogs), but we want to wait until we know exactly what's what with her hips.

I don't know if I really have a specific question here, I guess I'm just feeling nervous and am having my doubts. I think if we can get trained well she will be a great member to our family, but I get nervous at the thought of her ever being alone with our other dog, or, when we decide to have children, being with them as well. I also don't know how serious the hip thing is.

Now, I did feel kind of the same way when we got our last 2 dogs (Nellie & Sam, Sam passed away in June). That same kind of 'what was I thinking, is this the right thing?' feeling. Is it common to feel this way?
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Old 11-24-2014, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Montana
1,752 posts, read 1,656,380 times
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Boxer + Staffordshire Terrier = Rambunctious dog until about two years old, then energetic dog for about 10 more years. Three days before she dies, she'll be a really calm mellow dog ;/).

My Taffy is an adopted dog, and for a long time I thought she was a Staffordshire Terrier mix, now I think she's Black Mouth Cur/Terrier mix, but for about 6 months I was really questioning my decision to adopt her. She goes from dawn to dusk, loves fetch and running, and is constantly trying to engage my Tuck in running games, or the wife or myself to throw a ball. She chewed all of our wood funiture, and destroyed two leather chairs (make sure you have lots of chews and Kong toys!!! Your furniture will thank me!).

Now at year three, I am not sure why I was frustrated. She is the sweetest, most people pleasing dog around, and when her "off" switch finally registers, she becomes a snuggle dog.

However, she's still high energy! I generally walk her about 2 1/2 miles in the morning, and a potty walk at night, plus outdoor play time in the back yard. This morning, for something different, I took her and Tuck to a beach park, and she literally ran for thirty minutes (in the grass, on the beach, chasing black crabs, and chasing Tuck). We then went to another beach area, and she saw a Mongoose, and for another 30 minutes she ran from bush to bush flushing the Mongoose. When it was established the Mongoose escaped, she ran along the coast for a few minutes.

When we got home, she jumped up on my bed and fell asleep.

The key to success with a high energy dog is to give them an outlet to run off the energy. Long walks, bicycle runs (running alongside you while you ride a bike), fetch using a ball launcher, and if you have access to a field or park that allows it, and the dog has good recall, an open field to just let her RUN!
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Old 11-24-2014, 02:03 PM
 
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I don't really have any answers for you. I'm just here to sympathize.
About two weeks ago we adopted a shelter dog, too. She's an Aussie mix, about 10 months old. She's extremely energetic, and since we have had geriatric dogs for the last four years, it's a huge change for us.

Since she's had the all-clear after her spaying, we've been walking her twice a day (30 minutes each), and playing lots of ball in the backyard. We also give her stuffed Kong toys, which she loves. This seems to help. She's also pretty good about playing by herself in the backyard, although when she gets bored with her toys, she DIGS. ugh.

We've also been working with her basic commands, but the jumping thing is a problem for us too. She doesn't bite when she jumps, but she does nip at our ankles trying to herd us. We're trying to rid her of that, although at her age, it's a bit of a fight.

I'd try tiring your dog out with exercise, and then work on commands like sit, stay, down, and OFF. Maybe that will help.

Your dog's possible hip dysplasia is a bit of a worry. That's a pricey surgery, and a lot of down time afterward.
One of our first dogs was a huge black lab mix. His vet wanted to do preventive surgery for hip dysplasia when he was a puppy. A friend had adopted our dog's brother, and his vet recommended NOT getting the surgery for the pups. His advice was just to enjoy the dog while you have it, give it pain meds when the time came, and say good-bye when necessary.
We took that advice, and our 120 pound black lab lived to be 10 years and 3 months old, and we lost him to a neurological disorder.

I'd be concerned with a yorkie butting heads with a boxer-sized dog, too. I tend to be a worrier, so I'd totally keep them apart. If the dogs were of a similar size, I'd say they could probably work things out themselves (ours did), but a yorkie could seem like prey for the bigger dog.

Good luck with your pup.
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Old 11-24-2014, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Scott County, Tennessee/by way of Detroit
3,330 posts, read 2,127,102 times
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This all sounds like Ruby our terrier mix...we have had her since she was 6 mos old..TRIED obedience school and she cried and whined the whole class..she was trying to climb the walls and get out and I just couldn't figure out what was wrong...but I quit going because it wasn't working...she still jumps on people too..never got a way from that and wiggles her butt up to new people...and gets so excited..she will be 6 in April....has a high energy level still...I know what you mean about the smaller dog...we had to board her for a week at an unfamiliar boarding place since we just moved and took her there...the guy was really interested in her and she in him..he said she will like his puppy..she is a hard player too so I thought he had a terrier mix too..no he has a Yorkie.....I WAS very worried.... She never was around a little dog before and was sitting on that airplane worried sick......but when I picked her up she came out of a room with 2 small dogs and was fine with them the whole 8 days....I never would have thought...so you may be surprised they will become good friends hopefully....but good advice about the exercise from the other posters...hope it wall works out for you and your pets!!!!
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Old 11-24-2014, 03:49 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Again, I have been home for one hour and I can't take it. I try throwing the ball in the yard and she just lays down and chews on it. She just doesn't seem interested in yard play. Since that wasn't working I decided to be brave and walk her (husband wasn't home yet). We didn't do too bad but there were people down the street and she was really starting to pull so I turned around. Like I said a half hour run and she's nice & tired but I just can't handle her in the leash yet & hubby doesn't take her till night time. She zeroes in on the yorkie and I have no control. He's home now and guess what she's in her bed chewing her bone.
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Old 11-24-2014, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Montana
1,752 posts, read 1,656,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrsydevil82 View Post
Again, I have been home for one hour and I can't take it. I try throwing the ball in the yard and she just lays down and chews on it. She just doesn't seem interested in yard play. Since that wasn't working I decided to be brave and walk her (husband wasn't home yet). We didn't do too bad but there were people down the street and she was really starting to pull so I turned around. Like I said a half hour run and she's nice & tired but I just can't handle her in the leash yet & hubby doesn't take her till night time. She zeroes in on the yorkie and I have no control. He's home now and guess what she's in her bed chewing her bone.
Hang in there! You have about six more months of puppy/teenager, and the dog will likely calm quite a bit. Also, she's adjusting to her new home and family, just like you're adjusting to her being there, I would think that could take up to a month for the re-adjustment - and that's not a bad dog, or a bad owner, that's just the reality of a transition this major.

My Taffy truely had me wondering if I should take her back to the pound, but I told myself I commited, and her faults were energy, not a bad or problem dog, just energy! We are nearly at year three, and she truely is the best dog, and a lot of fun. I would have missed that, and the next 10-12 years with a great dog if I would have given up on her.

She smiles when I come home (smiles like a person, showing her top teeth - it's gruesume and endearing at the same time!).

I use the black Kong products with Taffy, and they only lasted 2-3 weeks when she was chewing hard. The chewing on the ball may be her dealing with stress, not her being uncooperative. Also, she may not be a "fetcher" (My Tuck is good for three throws, then I get "The Look" and no fetch, Taffy, well, if you'll throw a ball, she'll get a ball!)

You had a small success with the walk, build on that success! I think you really just need some time to get the dog trained to how things operate in the home/house rules, and you'll have a great (but energetic) dog!
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Old 11-24-2014, 05:59 PM
 
Location: West Virginia
12,447 posts, read 31,530,567 times
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I return the dog Sorry but little dog wouldn't have a chance if the bigger dog got to rough & on top of that you don't have any control. Bad hips are just going to lead to you having huge vet bills... unless you can handle that just adds to the stress.
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Old 11-24-2014, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Northeastern U.S.
1,467 posts, read 897,117 times
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You might have considered that a Boxer/AmStaff mix was very likely to be quite high-energy and muscular and exuberent before you adopted her. And you should have brought your Yorkie along to meet the other dog at the shelter before making the decision to adopt.

Now that you have brought this lively young mixed-breed into your home, you have a choice to make. You can tough it out, work seriously with the dog, find ways for her to regularly release her energy, train her not to jump up, deal with her possible medical issues, or quickly return her to the shelter before she gets used to your home. The worst is that you are nervous around her; most dogs can sense that and take advantage of it. You have to become the one in control, without resorting to physical force or screaming. She sounds like she is acting like a typical enthusiastic young dog around the Yorkie; but the size disparity could result in damage to Nellie if Fawn escalates her play level. I think you're right not to leave them alone together, at least not yet; Fawn might eventually tone it down with Nellie; but in the meantime, use babygates and crates to separate them when you cannot supervise them.

I don't understand why Fawn is possibly dysplastic when the shelter told you she had no health problems. If they were wrong about that, or lied about it, I would wonder what else they exaggerated or omitted or lied about in their estimation of Fawn.

You just might not be a person who is comfortable with a rambunctious, pushy young and very powerful dog. I would never own a Boxer or Staffordshire/Pit Bull type, not because I dislike or fear them, but because they are just too much dog for me. (I'm also quite a bit older than you)

I think you could succeed in molding Fawn into a good companion, but whether you want to invest the considerable time and effort, not to mention the money if she does turn out to be dysplastic, is a choice only you can make. All dogs, whether puppies from responsible breeders, or any rescue/shelter dog, take time and effort; but some take more than others.

Good luck.
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Old 11-24-2014, 07:28 PM
 
621 posts, read 1,047,688 times
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First things first. I suggest you keep the new dog away from your little guy until things begin to calm down. Too much can happen too fast.
It's good the new dog is good in a crate. Use it and allow your little guy his own time with you all, while new dog is crated. When new dog begins to get wound up, find his very favorite toy/bone, whatever and put him and it in his crate to allow him to calm down. He ONLY gets that treat in his crate, no where else!!

Get yourself a doggie backpack and fill it with bottles of water, bags of dry beans, stuff. Have him wear it while on a walk, gives a job and will wear him down a bit faster.

As far as the jumping up- don't turn around, or back away. Instead walk into the dog, quick and hard as soon as you see his front feet coming off the ground. The trick is to stop him before he gets into the air. Another one that works for hard core jumpers- grab his front feet and just hold on. Let him struggle some, make it uncomfortable for him... make it NOT fun. Talk sweet while you have those big old feet in your hand... remember, that was his idea, not yours! If you need to ,walk into him as you are holding his feet... throw him off balance. Then let him go without any big fanfare.

Trust me, he will try it again. Cool!!! Just grab his feet and hold on, walk into him again. He will begin to think about this game of his and how it's not quite working out to be as much fun as it used to be. Make it his idea to not do that anymore!!!! Remember this is a tough combination of breeds, bred to take a licking, bred to not feel a lot of pain, bred to be very very tenacious! You will have to out think him!!!

Teach him tricks, teach him to go find things you hide, use that brain of his. If he won't fetch one ball, get 10 balls- throw one, and if he stops to chew it, throw another, then another, then another...... keep him moving. Then quit while he is still wanting more. He'll get it eventually.

Give him some time... be the boss, set up rules and follow them.
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Old 11-24-2014, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Montana
1,752 posts, read 1,656,380 times
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Dualie, I have mine sit and stay, go into a different room and "hide" and then yell "find dad!" They search the house and when they "find" me, they get a treat. It's one of their very favorite games!
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