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Old 03-11-2015, 12:40 PM
 
386 posts, read 363,024 times
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I recently brought a 7 week old mini schnauzer home about a week ago.

When my fiancee and I are standing in the area of our room where we keep him, he will constantly bite at our feet and heels. He even growls at her when biting, but does not growl at me. Anytime we come to feed him, change his pee pads, or anything at all really he starts biting at us.

We have told him NO in a firm voice and he continues to do it. He has raw hide and a chew toy to chew on, which he does...but after a few seconds he'll direct his attention back to biting our feet. I'm not sure if he's biting us playfully, because he's teething or because he is trying to establish dominance.

Any tips on what to do? I know he's young and I'm working with him.
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Old 03-11-2015, 01:34 PM
 
Location: ATL
170 posts, read 171,171 times
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6 weeks was too young to be away from his mother.

In any case, little puppies will nip and bite. They have to be taught bite inhibition. There are a lot of bite inhibition training methods and you can run a search on it. For me, I rewarded good behavior and ignored the bad. When my puppy bit or nipped, I'd yelp loudly and turn my back or walk away for a short time and then return. I'd repeat every time he nipped or bit. It takes a while and requires patience and training, but keep at whatever training method you choose and your puppy will stop the nipping.
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Old 03-11-2015, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Houston
811 posts, read 1,197,931 times
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Please be very careful when giving him rawhide. They can choke on it and a lot of it is from China. I had an American Bulldog that started to choke on rawhide. Unfortunately she was food aggressive and she wouldn't let us near her. Luckily she coughed it up before the situation became dire. Rawhide has never been allowed in my house again! This is a very good article about rawhide.

Finding the Right Rawhide Chew For Your Dog - Whole Dog Journal Article
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Old 03-11-2015, 02:43 PM
 
672 posts, read 617,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UsernameCreativity View Post
6 weeks was too young to be away from his mother.

In any case, little puppies will nip and bite. They have to be taught bite inhibition. There are a lot of bite inhibition training methods and you can run a search on it. For me, I rewarded good behavior and ignored the bad. When my puppy bit or nipped, I'd yelp loudly and turn my back or walk away for a short time and then return. I'd repeat every time he nipped or bit. It takes a while and requires patience and training, but keep at whatever training method you choose and your puppy will stop the nipping.

This. This puppy was removed from it's mom and littermates WAY too young. It has not learned social behavior from mom or siblings. I can't even fathom a reputable breeder removing pups from the mom before 10 to 12 weeks. The link below says 8- 8 1/2 weeks, but my opinion is that is still too young.

Is This the Reason Why Adult Dogs Have Behavior Problems?
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Old 03-11-2015, 02:52 PM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,591,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz Bee View Post
This. This puppy was removed from it's mom and littermates WAY too young. It has not learned social behavior from mom or siblings. I can't even fathom a reputable breeder removing pups from the mom before 10 to 12 weeks. The link below says 8- 8 1/2 weeks, but my opinion is that is still too young.

Is This the Reason Why Adult Dogs Have Behavior Problems?
Our pup was a rescue who was also separated from his mama at less than 7 weeks. We were lucky, though, to already have a 2 year old female retriever mix who mothered him constanty and corrected him. She still scolds him if he takes off with a pair of socks, and that pup is now two years old. But it was so difficult to housetrain him, and sometimes we wonder if his persistent poop eating (please, we did try EVERYTHING) is the result of leaving his mama too soon.

So for this pup, it takes patience, a consistent and calm response, and training training, training. Correct him by giving him something else to chew. Teach him what "No" or "Uh-uh" means. He won't get it at first; he's a baby. Remember that. It will take more time than you want it to, but he will learn if you are consistent and patient in your approach.
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Old 03-11-2015, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,879 posts, read 2,383,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz Bee View Post
This. This puppy was removed from it's mom and littermates WAY too young. It has not learned social behavior from mom or siblings. I can't even fathom a reputable breeder removing pups from the mom before 10 to 12 weeks. The link below says 8- 8 1/2 weeks, but my opinion is that is still too young.

Is This the Reason Why Adult Dogs Have Behavior Problems?
I agree 100%..Puppies require that time with mother/sibbings to learn basic rules/boundaries and limitations..never mind being weened from nursing ways too early!! Puppies teeth are very sharp tho tiny..but they sure can hurt..I've watched mommy dogs smack their pup's away when they nip her when nursing!!

I've forgotten the timing for all their shots..But I do believe OP's little pub has NOT received all the required shots..someone correct me IF I am wrong on that.
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Old 03-11-2015, 03:22 PM
 
386 posts, read 363,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UsernameCreativity View Post
6 weeks was too young to be away from his mother.

In any case, little puppies will nip and bite. They have to be taught bite inhibition. There are a lot of bite inhibition training methods and you can run a search on it. For me, I rewarded good behavior and ignored the bad. When my puppy bit or nipped, I'd yelp loudly and turn my back or walk away for a short time and then return. I'd repeat every time he nipped or bit. It takes a while and requires patience and training, but keep at whatever training method you choose and your puppy will stop the nipping.
Definitely agree that 6 weeks was too young. Spoke with my vet about this as well.

I've started to walk away and leave him alone, but when I come back after a few minutes he starts doing it again. I know it'll take a lot of patience.

He received his first round of shots.
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Old 03-11-2015, 03:58 PM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,591,773 times
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Originally Posted by J800 View Post
Definitely agree that 6 weeks was too young. Spoke with my vet about this as well.

I've started to walk away and leave him alone, but when I come back after a few minutes he starts doing it again. I know it'll take a lot of patience.

He received his first round of shots.
Puppies chew. They chew you, they chew your furniture, your clothes, any stick they can grab outside, they are chewing machines. Ours chewed our oak baseboards. They're opportunistic little critters who want to put everything in their mouths -- because that's what babies do. With puppies, it's how they become familiar with their environment. Your pup is going to be doing this for some time, so all you can do is give him a substitute for you, your clothes and your furniture.
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Old 03-11-2015, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
683 posts, read 1,615,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J800 View Post
Definitely agree that 6 weeks was too young. Spoke with my vet about this as well.

I've started to walk away and leave him alone, but when I come back after a few minutes he starts doing it again. I know it'll take a lot of patience.

He received his first round of shots.
Just curious? How did you end up with a six week old puppy?

As for the biting, get a water spray bottle, and when he bites firmly say "NO" and if he doesnt stop immediately, spray him in the face. If you're lucky and he hates it he will soon learn what No means and he will also stop biting.

The ignore method may work also.

You could also get a 1 year or so dog for him to play with and learn doggy manners from
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Old 03-11-2015, 04:46 PM
 
Location: ATL
170 posts, read 171,171 times
Reputation: 297
Quote:
Originally Posted by J800 View Post
Definitely agree that 6 weeks was too young. Spoke with my vet about this as well.

I've started to walk away and leave him alone, but when I come back after a few minutes he starts doing it again. I know it'll take a lot of patience.

He received his first round of shots.
When I started the ignore method, it was only for a few moments. I counted to maybe ten, then went back to playing with puppy. I built up to minutes over time so that puppy could understand that he was missing out on something due to one specific behavior.

However, there are a lot of methods (google search bite inhibition training) and some may work for you and some may not. Give a method a really good try and if it's not working, try something different. Definitely get more appropriate chew toys.

Since your pup is so very young, I'd also recommend tethering. This would be do the first step in leash training (getting him used to leash), then using a long leash, attach one end to you and one end to him (I'd wrap around my waist or pull through a belt loop on jeans). Then puppy will have to follow you wherever you go. For me, this improved house training as well as helped puppy learn to follow my lead. It relaxed him to be near me all the time, made it easier for me to do quick training sessions since he was right there, and absolutely helped with chewing and biting because he got to chew the best stuff when he was sitting quietly.
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