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Old 02-15-2008, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
1,368 posts, read 5,967,876 times
Reputation: 536

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Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
Radek.....maybe a compromise how about a breed or mixed breed that doesn't have the energy level of the dogs you're accustomed to??

How about little clowns..like a French or English bull dog??? Both very lovable, great companions but virtually sleep all day when you are gone?? true couch potatoes but very social dogs...also mine LOVES to play and run to catch a ball et al but are usually ok home alone all day

Unfortunately because of the rise in popularity of these breeds many are now in rescue

Good luck in your search
The english bull dog puppies are cute. All wrinkly, etc... but the amount of time and energy in housebreaking a dog, I'm not sure I have that.

But, I've never really been a huge bull dog fan.

What about: Alaskan Klee Kai Puppy - Alaskan Klee Kai Dog Breed Information
The Alaskan Klee Kai? (not the toy, but the 23lb size)

Note to those encouraging shelters: I WILL be finding my dog from a shelter. I'm trying to set up a set of attributes to look for initially.

I've met a few of these I've liked: Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler Puppy - Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler Dog Breed Information
But Im concerned they'd get bored at home.

What about one of the smaller shepherds? (Not a full german, but like an Australian)
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Old 02-15-2008, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,098 posts, read 24,820,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radek View Post
The english bull dog puppies are cute. All wrinkly, etc... but the amount of time and energy in housebreaking a dog, I'm not sure I have that.

But, I've never really been a huge bull dog fan.

What about: Alaskan Klee Kai Puppy - Alaskan Klee Kai Dog Breed Information
The Alaskan Klee Kai? (not the toy, but the 23lb size)

Note to those encouraging shelters: I WILL be finding my dog from a shelter. I'm trying to set up a set of attributes to look for initially.

I've met a few of these I've liked: Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler Puppy - Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler Dog Breed Information
But Im concerned they'd get bored at home.

What about one of the smaller shepherds? (Not a full german, but like an Australian)
I do not know enough about these breeds to make an intelligent comment

from what I just read in your links the bolded part is wht i would be concerned about as far as the Austrailian:

Temperament: An extremely intelligent, loyal, and affectionate breed, the Australian Cattle Dog is protective of their family, home, and territory. They thrive on human interaction and activity but are easily bored which can lead to serious behavior issues. This breed is generally not good with children they have not been raised with. They are typically suspicious of strangers and may be aggressive to dogs they do not know. They do not get along well with other household pets or cats. This breed will attempt to herd and nip at the heels of anything and everything that moves. The Australian Cattle Dog has a high level of dominance and is not recommended for the novice, sedentary, or apathetic dog owner.

You've had dogs before so I'm sure you will do your homework before actually adopting one..please post pics when you do
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Old 02-15-2008, 08:53 AM
 
15,254 posts, read 16,769,309 times
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I guess what I was saying is that rather than looking for a particular breed (which will be harder to come by in a shelter) that you look for particular characteristics in a particular dog, which you could do with the help of shelter staff or foster parents. As in, "I'm looking for a really smart dog who will go hiking off leash with me in the snow but who also can handle staying at home alone 4 hours at a time without tearing the place up." Or, "who is crate trained" or "who I can train to catch a frisbee" or whatever. Someone familiar with a particular dog might say "you shouldn't adopt Greta because the minute you take her off the leash she's gone" or something similar.

You can also throw in the physical characteristics you're after, but you need a dog who is going to fit in with your lifestyle in order to make the adoption work.
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Old 02-15-2008, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
1,368 posts, read 5,967,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I guess what I was saying is that rather than looking for a particular breed (which will be harder to come by in a shelter) that you look for particular characteristics in a particular dog, which you could do with the help of shelter staff or foster parents. As in, "I'm looking for a really smart dog who will go hiking off leash with me in the snow but who also can handle staying at home alone 4 hours at a time without tearing the place up." Or, "who is crate trained" or "who I can train to catch a frisbee" or whatever. Someone familiar with a particular dog might say "you shouldn't adopt Greta because the minute you take her off the leash she's gone" or something similar.

You can also throw in the physical characteristics you're after, but you need a dog who is going to fit in with your lifestyle in order to make the adoption work.
So, you recommend I just go out and look for specific dogs w/ the traits, rather than trying to narrow it by breed first?


And I'd pay top dollar to find a dog that could do that. Our samoyed was fine off the leash at our cabin, but open the front door of the house in Edmonds? WHAM! She was gone like a rocket. Pretty sure thats how my friends and I stayed in shape as children.
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Old 02-15-2008, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
1,368 posts, read 5,967,876 times
Reputation: 536
Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
I do not know enough about these breeds to make an intelligent comment

from what I just read in your links the bolded part is wht i would be concerned about as far as the Austrailian:

Temperament: An extremely intelligent, loyal, and affectionate breed, the Australian Cattle Dog is protective of their family, home, and territory. They thrive on human interaction and activity but are easily bored which can lead to serious behavior issues. This breed is generally not good with children they have not been raised with. They are typically suspicious of strangers and may be aggressive to dogs they do not know. They do not get along well with other household pets or cats. This breed will attempt to herd and nip at the heels of anything and everything that moves. The Australian Cattle Dog has a high level of dominance and is not recommended for the novice, sedentary, or apathetic dog owner.

You've had dogs before so I'm sure you will do your homework before actually adopting one..please post pics when you do
its going to be a while. I'm in the preliminary homework/research stage.

Edit: But of course I will when I do!

Here's snowflake:
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Old 02-15-2008, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
5,233 posts, read 7,718,988 times
Reputation: 2623
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radek View Post
I'm sorry that we rescued a border collie puppy because I was in Eastern WA, and the options were take that puppy or let it die. Because the farmer already had one pup, and didn't need the others. So I'm sorry I took it home, house-trained it, fed it, introduced it to our samoyed, and raised her from a pup. I'm really sorry I 'failed' at that so that some other household who has multiple children who can really be there and play with the dog now have a dog that would've been buried in the middle of washington. Yeah, thats a failure in my book.

I was 15 when we got that 6mo old pup, and was 19 when I had to give her away.

Again, this thread is getting dangerously close to off-topic. My question is not whether or not you THINK that you know enough about ME, MY LIFE, MY SITUATION to determine if *I* should have a dog, I've covered the fact that I *KNOW* from EXPERIENCE what it takes to raise a dog. Both from one that was abused (Snowflake) and one that was a puppy (the Border Collie).
The point is you (and your family since you were 15 when you got the dog) didn't HAVE to give up the dog. You CHOSE to give up the dog because it longer was convenient for you. It sounds like you made that decision in the last year or two. If you made that choice once, you will make it again. I know you have the intention of buying a home. I had lots of intentions when I was your age, some came to be and others did not. Why not wait until you have the home?
I know you found a home for the Collie, but if you had held up your end of the deal TWO dogs would now have a home instead of one.
As far as the off-topic thing goes. You asked a general question about "people's thoughts on getting a dog." My thought was that you are not ready. I won't share that again, knowing you are now past that point in your decision making.
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Old 02-15-2008, 09:12 AM
 
15,254 posts, read 16,769,309 times
Reputation: 25416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radek View Post
So, you recommend I just go out and look for specific dogs w/ the traits, rather than trying to narrow it by breed first?


And I'd pay top dollar to find a dog that could do that. Our samoyed was fine off the leash at our cabin, but open the front door of the house in Edmonds? WHAM! She was gone like a rocket. Pretty sure thats how my friends and I stayed in shape as children.
Well, that's what I did and it worked for us. I told people at shelters, etc., that I was looking for a medium-sized dog with a short to medium coat between 2-3 years old that was really smart and really good-natured. I explained that we had cats and a young child and I didn't want a dog that had ever shown any sort of aggression and particularly no food bowl aggression because I was worried about my daughter reaching toward the bowl without thinking. I looked around for about 4 months and then saw the dog we have now on Petfinders. She looked smart and intent in the picture. When I called about her, the foster mom said that she had been around kids and cats and was very mellow. She was pregnant when they got her but had allowed people to handle her puppies. I went out to look at her was impressed with her calm demeanor. It's been a lovefest ever since.

So yes, I think you need to think about personality and behavioral characteristics of a particular dog that also has the physical characteristics you're looking for.
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Old 02-15-2008, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Finger Lakes, NY
223 posts, read 902,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radek View Post
So, you recommend I just go out and look for specific dogs w/ the traits, rather than trying to narrow it by breed first?
A dogs trait is in it's blood ... it's part of the breed. We always had Shetland Sheepdogs when I was a kid, they all have the same trait, and the personality was even very similar. Labradors, same thing. Sibe's, yup! If you can narrow down your search to breeds that have the traits you are looking for, you will be able to pass that along to shelters as the breed mixtures you are looking for. Hope that helps a tad bit.
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Old 02-15-2008, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
1,368 posts, read 5,967,876 times
Reputation: 536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art123 View Post
The point is you (and your family since you were 15 when you got the dog) didn't HAVE to give up the dog. You CHOSE to give up the dog because it longer was convenient for you. It sounds like you made that decision in the last year or two. If you made that choice once, you will make it again. I know you have the intention of buying a home. I had lots of intentions when I was your age, some came to be and others did not. Why not wait until you have the home?
I know you found a home for the Collie, but if you had held up your end of the deal TWO dogs would now have a home instead of one.
As far as the off-topic thing goes. You asked a general question about "people's thoughts on getting a dog." My thought was that you are not ready. I won't share that again, knowing you are now past that point in your decision making.
If we had been able to fulfill our end, correct. Two dogs would have a home. But by taking that chance, one dog indeed does have a home, instead of the certain death that awaited her.

My mom was caring for her, but she eventually decided she didn't want the hassle. I wanted to take my dog, but again, freshman living requirement. I had planned to live on campus for a year, and then bring my dog with me the year after... my mom couldn't wait that long, and my step-mom decided that she wanted to get a new dog instead of taking mine (I am still bitter about this, as much as I love Emily, their dog). The decision was not wholly mine, and I attempted to work with 3 different people (mom, step-mom + father, and brother) but none were able/willing.

Why wait? Because I miss having a dog around, and I really want to go hiking with someone, and not just myself. My friends are not quite so energetic to go out when its sub-freezing. And I'm at a point where I have the fiscal ability to handle a dog, and will shortly be able to with my living situation.
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Old 02-15-2008, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
1,368 posts, read 5,967,876 times
Reputation: 536
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiChick View Post
A dogs trait is in it's blood ... it's part of the breed. We always had Shetland Sheepdogs when I was a kid, they all have the same trait, and the personality was even very similar. Labradors, same thing. Sibe's, yup! If you can narrow down your search to breeds that have the traits you are looking for, you will be able to pass that along to shelters as the breed mixtures you are looking for. Hope that helps a tad bit.
I think Marlow does have a point that the shelters and such have a better knowledge than I will as to what is what.

But, thanks for the advice guys. I think I'll make a trip to the animal shelter this weekend to see what Bozeman has to offer.
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