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Old 08-06-2016, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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We have identified a dog we would like to adopt. She is in Korea and will not be sent to U.S. until a family match. There is some level of medical attention for these dogs but of course, it is still risky. I have been to Vietnam where i saw many puppies crammed in baskets on the back of motor cycles and on the way to market. It haunts me and I would like to save a dog from this. Please let me know what you can share.

 
Old 08-06-2016, 05:44 PM
 
Location: West Virginia
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With all the Millions of Dogs being put to sleep in the US for lack of home You want to bring in a dog from else where with god know what.....
 
Old 08-06-2016, 06:43 PM
 
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I hope you did all the research. Dogs are categorized either as pets or food in Korea. If you are looking to adopt one of those dogs meant to be food, consider this: you are taking home a dog that had no socialization, may have a lot of behavior problems (fear of everything, shyness of people, fear aggression, etc) that can be managed but never cured. Because these kinds of dogs are born strictly to be raised for food, they suffered a lifetime of abuse, neglect and malnutrition that may have a long term impact in their learning and other medical problems.

It's understandable to want to save them. But the damage done to them mentally and physically can be so bad, these dogs are not for anyone who never worked with feral, street dogs and abused dogs. For example, potty training. For a typical pet, if it peed on the rug, you can say "No" and it will learn and be okay. A meat dog would react by running away from you and become more afraid. A meat dog will try to break out of your home and it will learn to trust maybe one or two people in its life.

I urge you to reconsider. If you did all your research, and accept one of the many challenges that I mentioned, then feel free to try to adopt one. But you must also accept that there is no turning back. If the dog become too much, you will not find anyone who have the experience and knowledge to handle such dogs.

Fyi, many of these kinds of dogs rescued from slaughter are not suitable for adoption. Many die anyway from the diseases or their temperament makes them not adoptable.
 
Old 08-06-2016, 07:55 PM
 
965 posts, read 500,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheesenugget View Post
I hope you did all the research. Dogs are categorized either as pets or food in Korea. If you are looking to adopt one of those dogs meant to be food, consider this: you are taking home a dog that had no socialization, may have a lot of behavior problems (fear of everything, shyness of people, fear aggression, etc) that can be managed but never cured. Because these kinds of dogs are born strictly to be raised for food, they suffered a lifetime of abuse, neglect and malnutrition that may have a long term impact in their learning and other medical problems.

It's understandable to want to save them. But the damage done to them mentally and physically can be so bad, these dogs are not for anyone who never worked with feral, street dogs and abused dogs. For example, potty training. For a typical pet, if it peed on the rug, you can say "No" and it will learn and be okay. A meat dog would react by running away from you and become more afraid. A meat dog will try to break out of your home and it will learn to trust maybe one or two people in its life.

I urge you to reconsider. If you did all your research, and accept one of the many challenges that I mentioned, then feel free to try to adopt one. But you must also accept that there is no turning back. If the dog become too much, you will not find anyone who have the experience and knowledge to handle such dogs.

Fyi, many of these kinds of dogs rescued from slaughter are not suitable for adoption. Many die anyway from the diseases or their temperament makes them not adoptable.
This is very interesting (though still depressing) I for one am very grateful that you posted all of this information. Thank you cn!

I will be interested in what No Kudzu finds. I have never heard anything about adopting dogs from Korea to save them from slaughter. I was aware they raise them as food, and that they are not pet material, but never got past that part.

Considering the way show dogs are bred for certain qualities, to the detriment of others I would assume that they do the same for dogs they breed for food. I had just never thought of it. Sigh....

Personally I can handle a dog with physical limitations, but mental/emotional/psychological issues are too much for me.

I learned by default when I had a foster dog "dumped" on me (I was to foster, and the group disappeared). This dog just wanted to lay in the corner of the yard all day with her back against the wall.
Catching her was SO stressful for her that it made me sick to my stomach. I finally left a lead on her, and never took her out without it, everything had to be in slo-mo. It wrecked my heart daily...

After 6 months I had a friend who thought they could take her (if touched she would just freeze by then, no longer bolting, but she never seemed to enjoy touch).

They loved her, and were determined to "help" her, but she did get away from them in the first month, and after 3 days of frantic searching, sightings, etc.... Someone found her dead on the side of the road hit by a car. We were all devastated.

I had had little hope that she would ever be anything but but barely functional, but at the time felt there was no need for euthanasia. A tightly controlled environment was the best anyone could ever had done for her. We all wondered if it was brain damage, or absolutely no socialization, or..... She was never comfortable (except alone hiding, much less happy).

If I had to do it over again I believe the kindest thing to have done would to have been to have her euthanized, or just have left her in the yard 24/7 (with shelter), but I just couldn't do either at the time (though I was close to having her pts). I know we are all different, but I could not bear to see the vacant, beaten look in her eyes.

Sorry, I did go on... but she was very special, and so pained. I had never seen it before, or since. Oh and I hope to never see t again.
 
Old 08-06-2016, 08:10 PM
 
965 posts, read 500,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie1 View Post
With all the Millions of Dogs being put to sleep in the US for lack of home You want to bring in a dog from else where with god know what.....
I feel there is no reason to shame someone for their choice Also our shelters are ABSOLUTELY not exempt from releasing dogs with "who knows what" every.single.day. Puppies in shelters often do not survive because of diseases that runs rampant with so many dogs warehoused together. Buying from pet stores, puppy mills, unscrupulous breeders, also imperfect.

Not our business to judge, helpful information if needed, or requested might be just the thing.

Last edited by simplepeace; 08-06-2016 at 08:42 PM..
 
Old 08-06-2016, 08:40 PM
 
1,012 posts, read 1,049,783 times
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There are so many dogs in the U.S. looking for homes already, why go to so much effort to bring one here.

I think that maybe our efforts are better spent in working to prevent future dogs from being raised for food, as many of those dogs have not been raised to be pets.
We also need to work on preventing puppy mill breeding here in the U.S.
There's so much work to be done for animals here.
 
Old 08-06-2016, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
4,652 posts, read 8,576,000 times
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Why help Korea with their dog problem when there are so many to help here?
 
Old 08-06-2016, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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These are interesting remarks and resemble the remarks people who adopt children internationally frequently get. "There are so many kids here who need homes, why go overseas" "you know you will be getting some unloved, unsocilaized child don't you?" "god knows what kind of diseases and conditions they bring with them". Of course there is a big difference in adopting a child and adopting a dog but the tone of the remarks, for the most part, is similar...condescending and judgmental.

And how do you know I don't actively work to prevent backyard and puppy mill breeding? How do you know how many rescue dogs I've adopted or found homes for?

Thank you simplepeace for your remarks. Indeed, I was looking for information. I was doing the necessary research.

BTW the dog i was interested in was or very much looked like a Maltese and I am told it once belonged to a family but was picked up as a stray. She likes women but is timid around men and since I don't plan on getting rid of my husband of 40 years any time soon I did not press with more research.

Each dog is matched with a family before being brought over.It's not like they wholesale ship a bunch of rescued dogs over and then try to find them homes. All adopters have to go to a major airport to pick up their dogs and all fees have to be paid in advance. I doubt they have many takers but the way I look at it a dog's life saved is a dog's life saved regardless of where it is. Guess I'll be judged for that as well.

Have you ever talked to US military who took in a street dog from Afganistan or Iraq? These dogs are taunted, tortured, and teased, have rocks thrown at them and shot at for target practice yet some warm up to a kind voice and gentleness and food offered by US soldiers and some soldiers will move heaven and earth to bring these dogs home because they know what fate has in store for dogs left behind.

Last edited by no kudzu; 08-06-2016 at 10:18 PM..
 
Old 08-06-2016, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
4,652 posts, read 8,576,000 times
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Hello...a dog is not = to a child. You're comparing apples to oranges. When was the last time you seen kill shelters for children? You haven't because dogs and kids are not equal.

What a waste of resources to get a "maltese" look alike from Korea when you could find a maltese look alike that needs a home close to where you live.

Frankly, we have enough dogs in the US to fill our needs many times over. No need to go to Korea to find a mutt or save a stray.
 
Old 08-07-2016, 05:24 AM
 
1,706 posts, read 1,210,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LBTRS View Post
Hello...a dog is not = to a child. You're comparing apples to oranges. When was the last time you seen kill shelters for children? You haven't because dogs and kids are not equal.
NK didn't say that a dog = a child; she simply said that some of the comments made to her were analagous to those one would get if considering adopting a child abroad.

Generally speaking, I come down on the side of adopting locally. However, there are clearly individual situations that need to be considered such as the example of members of the military bringing dogs here from Afghanistan. Remember though that in such cases, the military person has already met the dog and formed a relationship with the dog, so it isn't a sight unseen situation.

Adopting a dog sight unseen from whether from another country or another state is problematic. My primary concern would be for my existing dogs. How would they be affected by a new dog with potentially numerous issues? What if the new dog was never able to adapt to living inside, was anxious, was reactive/aggressive, or wasn't able to get along with the other dogs? How would that affect my dogs and the way I manage my canine pack and my household? Are you willing to make whatever changes in your lifestyle to accommodate a whole slew of potential issues? Are you willing to work long-term on behavioral issues that may never resolve?

It is possible that any new dog would fit seamlessly into your existing pack, but if it doesn't, it can entirely change the dynamic of your household. Even with knowledgeable management, a new dog with various issues creates tension, and your dogs will pick up on that.

So, I guess my caution is to be aware that what sounds good in theory, saving a dog's life by adopting a dog from another country, may or may not work out the way you expect it to.
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