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Old 08-21-2016, 02:34 PM
 
12,397 posts, read 7,452,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
We were lucky to find our new guy, and he is great. But its for sure very regional with the adoption process.
No, the adoption process just varies based on the organization. I've adopted a dog in different regions of the country, and have never had the problems you seemed to have. The most I have ever spent on an adoption fee is $250, and they've been up to date on shots, microchiped, and spayed or neutered. I've never had a home visit, never had to go through multiple interviews, and was always able to take my dog home the same day.

I've also worked with and volunteered with various rescues in different regions of the country. None of them had the issues you described. I'm not saying that such places don't exist, of course their are some shady organizations. But is every organization "up north" that way? Hardly. Just as not every place in the south is the greatest. There are great rescue organizations and their are bad organizations all over the country.
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Old 08-21-2016, 02:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundaydrive00 View Post
No, the adoption process just varies based on the organization. I've adopted a dog in different regions of the country, and have never had the problems you seemed to have. The most I have ever spent on an adoption fee is $250, and they've been up to date on shots, microchiped, and spayed or neutered. I've never had a home visit, never had to go through multiple interviews, and was always able to take my dog home the same day.

I've also worked with and volunteered with various rescues in different regions of the country. None of them had the issues you described. I'm not saying that such places don't exist, of course their are some shady organizations. But is every organization "up north" that way? Hardly. Just as not every place in the south is the greatest. There are great rescue organizations and their are bad organizations all over the country.
Moderator cut: PERSONAL ATTACK

My experience after working in rescue and talking to a lot of people who have worked in rescue and those who have adopted. I stand by my assertion that there is variation between adopting where dogs can mate year round v. places where stray dogs die in winter weather (making number of stray and adoptable dogs way lower).

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 08-23-2016 at 04:07 PM..
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Old 08-21-2016, 04:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
I stand by my assertion that there is variation between adopting where dogs can mate year round v. places where stray dogs die in winter weather (making number of stray and adoptable dogs way lower).
I currently live in a place where strays can (and do) die in the winter weather. I've never heard of the issues you seem to have with rescues. And as I said, I've worked and volunteered with rescues/shelters so I know plenty with how they work around here, and know plenty of people who have adopted animals from different rescues. There are good and bad organizations everywhere, and has nothing to do with the weather, so its just good to do your research when adopting.

Although I've never seen any rescue ship their animals in from other regions, so maybe it has more to do with you living in an area that doesn't have a problem with overpopulation. Which is not something I would complain about. If there is a demand for adopting animals, but their aren't enough animals to adopt, then I think its great that they rescue from areas that do have a high overpopulation.

And it might not be that they go out of their way to ship these animals up north, but are asked to help. One of the organizations I am involved with here in St. Louis took some animals from Louisiana a few years ago. Another rescue had saved the dogs from a fighting ring, but did not have space for all the dogs. They called other places, and I think we ended up being the closest one that could help out. I wouldn't consider that shipping in dogs, but rather taking in dogs that would otherwise be euthanized. The other rescue organization was the one that set up and paid for the transportation, and we took over the care of the animals once they were here. Vaccinations, spay/neuter, and any other medical needs were taken care of once the dogs were here. I believe a few of them were even enrolled in the pups for paroles program so that they were better socialized and trained before being adopted out.
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Old 08-21-2016, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
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All my dogs are rescue dogs. I have been a shelter volunteer, and worked with rescue. For decades! Some of the rescues make it harder to get a dog than adopt a child. I liked that analogy and it's true. A lot of the best dog parents I know can't get approval to adopt from rescue. But there is a reason for it. The dogs in rescue have perhaps been abused and already bounced around from pillar to post. There is a way to get around all the draconian over the top rules. Go volunteer for the rescue. Put in some time and let them get to know you.

In some areas of the country the rescues count it as a failure if a dog of their breed gets adopted out to the general public. They develop relationships with the shelter and cruise those lists online like crazy. They want those dogs to go to rescue and be adopted out to people who can meet all their requirements. One of my daily rescue duties is to cruise all the lists of pets picked up by Animal Control as lost/stray and notify the rescues about the animals that appear to be purebred. If the dog is not claimed by an owner the rescue will be first in line to pull the animal when the stray hold expires. That's why it is so difficult for a regular person to get a purebred dog from a shelter.

There are exceptions. In Las Vegas, it's pit-bulls and chihuahuas. You can get a truckload of these every day. There are so many of these dogs that breed rescue can't even make a dent in the shelter populations. If you want something else, you have to be patient and willing to look outside the box. There are small private shelters and there's always craigslist. Lots of owners would rather put their pet on CL than take it to a kill shelter. If you look for pets on CL, be careful, never go alone and be aware there are bad people out there!

Patience will always pay off. I did get a 10 mo old Weimaraner pup from a small private shelter in Las Vegas. The poor boy had been badly abused and beaten. Lola, my GSP, was feral. I got her from a small shelter in Huron, South Dakota. Lola is over 15 now. I lost my oldest GSP, Spot several months ago so I am now in the market for a new dog. I spent yesterday at the shelter here with a list of dogs I was interested in. Even though I was there before they opened, all my candidates were already adopted. Back to the drawing board!
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Old 08-22-2016, 01:22 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,135 posts, read 1,308,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
Its as if you follow me around on entire CD just to argue with me on anything and everything I say.

My experience after working in rescue and talking to a lot of people who have worked in rescue and those who have adopted. I stand by my assertion that there is variation between adopting where dogs can mate year round v. places where stray dogs die in winter weather (making number of stray and adoptable dogs way lower).
That may be. BUT, it seems to me the difference in number of available dogs between north and south is the emphasis on spay and neuter in the north (and lack thereof in many areas in the south). I gave up on adopting up here in New England after 4 months of searching. (There's another thread about rescue dogs you can reference for more about peoples' experiences.)
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Old 08-23-2016, 12:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
That may be. BUT, it seems to me the difference in number of available dogs between north and south is the emphasis on spay and neuter in the north (and lack thereof in many areas in the south). I gave up on adopting up here in New England after 4 months of searching. (There's another thread about rescue dogs you can reference for more about peoples' experiences.)
The weather plays a huge role. In the south, dogs can survive all year and mate all year. The head of a major rescue down south told me dogs down there go into heat twice a year but only once a year in colder climates. I don't know if that is true, but it would make sense that a stray dog wouldn't survive a really brutal winter, let alone a litter of puppies.

I think spay/neuter culture plays in as well. But it isn't the whole story.
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Old 08-23-2016, 12:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
That may be. BUT, it seems to me the difference in number of available dogs between north and south is the emphasis on spay and neuter in the north (and lack thereof in many areas in the south). I gave up on adopting up here in New England after 4 months of searching. (There's another thread about rescue dogs you can reference for more about peoples' experiences.)
Some rescues in the south will adopt out of state and work with a transport to get the dog to the adopter. If there is a dog you like at an out of state rescue in the south (or anywhere there is dog overpopulation), I'd contact them and at least ask. Where I am there are way too many dogs and not enough homes even with a mandatory spay/neuter law in my city.
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Old 08-23-2016, 01:11 PM
 
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My experience in Minnesota proves the point about cold weather places v warm weather places. It's nearly impossible to get a dog from a rescue in MN. You have to fill out tons of paperwork and wait and wait and wait and wait because so many people want dogs. Single people are discriminated against. And most of the dogs cared for by the MN rescues are brought up from the South or from Indian Reservations in the west.

There really IS a huge difference in availability of and care of stray animals between North and South. I believe it ties into the economic, cultural and religious differences between North and South more so than the weather, although weather may play a part.

Also, crazy cat ladies are calm and sane compared to crazy dog rescue ladies.

Also, St. Louis isn't North, it is Southern Midwestern in character, and any experiences there by certain argumentative posters don't apply to this conversation.
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Old 08-23-2016, 01:49 PM
 
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My rescue dog was born with a cleft palate and dumped at animal control to die at 2 days old. So I am extremely glad Animal Control called the rescue to come get him. Not all rescues are dog flippers.
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Old 08-23-2016, 03:57 PM
 
12,397 posts, read 7,452,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
Also, St. Louis isn't North, it is Southern Midwestern in character, and any experiences there by certain argumentative posters don't apply to this conversation.


It gets cold here in the winter. And as I said in my post, I've lived all over the country. Just because I currently live somewhere you consider the south ( and was considered "The North" when I lived in the actual South... And from in laws in the South) doesn't mean I don't have experience with rescues elsewhere in the country.
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