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Old 09-13-2016, 10:30 PM
 
3,651 posts, read 2,322,688 times
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....9 days ago and it has had no effect. Every month I have tried something stronger and stronger and he still has fleas and ticks. Now he does like to go into the year and bury himself in deep pits that he digs. He is a 120 pound Anatolian. I always get nervous whenever I go with the next strongest product fearing a negative reaction. I am really at my wits end here.
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Old 09-13-2016, 10:53 PM
 
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so keep him out of the yard, don't pump him with chemicals.
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Old 09-14-2016, 05:23 AM
 
965 posts, read 502,566 times
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If the house isn't clear of fleas then putting him in the house isn't going to help.

OP, is he a working dog? I assume you live somewhere hot, those pits keep him cool.
Have you considered trying cow tags? You can cut them to size, and attach them to the collar. It might be worth looking into. If your "yard" is a field you won't have much luck treating it.
You can look up essential oils to mix together with witch hazel and spray the dog daily, and put drops on the collar daily as well. It "might" help a little.

If he is a house dog, I would take him in to be groomed and get the big treatment/ dip to get rid of them, then have your yard treated and house treated at the same time.
Then repeat two weeks later (for example) to get rid of the hatching next batch, until you rid your house, dog and yard of all the fleas and ticks.
You can read online about how to do it exactly. It should all be done following the letter of the life cycle of the fleas.

Once you get rid of them you can use human grade DE, on the dog, and in the yard, and borax in the house and essential oils (also look for a soft cloth collar you can put essential oils on). It just takes daily work to use less chemicals.

I imagine there are others here who will have better advice, but I know once you have an infestation I know you must get rid of them or you will be fighting a downhill battle.
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Old 09-14-2016, 06:34 AM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 20,736,220 times
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unfortunately topicals arnt magical, most don't kill immediately on contact (the flea has to bite, OR they kill slowly on contact by essentially paralyzing the flea but that even takes a few hours)

and unfortunately tpical products are becoming ineffective...which products work is very area dependant...
here, we found out the hard way frontline plus is USELESS and are now battling out own infestation.
advantage's actve ingredient still seems to be getting good reviews here...talk to both your vet AND groomer and see what products seem to be working in your area.

add to that fleas are BAD this year...

to get rid of fleas you have to hit them multi level.
1: treat the dog: topical for long lasting but slow working prevention, capstar to kill the current adult fleas...
2: treat EVERYTHING the dog has come nto contact wuth...everything washable, (beding, curtains cushion covers ect) WASH WASH WASH (hot and with bleach whentever possible), once washed treat with a residucal product (I'm liking enforcer house spray) and let dry. (residual products kill adult fleas that walk across them much like topicals do helping prevent reinfestation)
3: TREAT THE WHOLE HOUSE if he comes indoors, youll have to treat everything, either with a residual spray like enforcer, or by bombing...don't think that because youd dog doesn't go in a room fleas cant be in there, they can jump and easily head upstairs, can climb up curtains, and can easily make it under doors.
TREAT EVERY ROOM.
4: treat the yard if possible...we cant realy do this one with over 6 acres, farm animals, and wildlife contantly wandering through treating the yard wouldn't do much good...but if theres a small area he seems to frequent most, treat that area...
5: VACUME...daily for a minimum of 30 days. (the fleas life cycle is 28) you want to vacume up not only any deads, but any newly hatching eggs) always dump the bag/canister into a separate bag, tie closed and remove form he house as soon as your done...

if yosing a residual sprayin the house/bedding, repeat in about 28 days to do a fast kill any newly hatching eggs. the residuals are good anything for 3-6 onths depending on the product, but they do take a while to get thigns under control.
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Old 09-14-2016, 08:02 AM
 
2,734 posts, read 2,771,028 times
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Had the same issue. Dog would have fleas after 2 weeks of using topical. Started using Nexgard chewable and haven't seen a flea since.
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Old 09-14-2016, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Canada
1,403 posts, read 842,932 times
Reputation: 4468
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxywench View Post
unfortunately topicals arnt magical, most don't kill immediately on contact (the flea has to bite, OR they kill slowly on contact by essentially paralyzing the flea but that even takes a few hours)

and unfortunately tpical products are becoming ineffective...which products work is very area dependant...
here, we found out the hard way frontline plus is USELESS and are now battling out own infestation.
advantage's actve ingredient still seems to be getting good reviews here...talk to both your vet AND groomer and see what products seem to be working in your area.

add to that fleas are BAD this year...

to get rid of fleas you have to hit them multi level.
1: treat the dog: topical for long lasting but slow working prevention, capstar to kill the current adult fleas...
2: treat EVERYTHING the dog has come nto contact wuth...everything washable, (beding, curtains cushion covers ect) WASH WASH WASH (hot and with bleach whentever possible), once washed treat with a residucal product (I'm liking enforcer house spray) and let dry. (residual products kill adult fleas that walk across them much like topicals do helping prevent reinfestation)
3: TREAT THE WHOLE HOUSE if he comes indoors, youll have to treat everything, either with a residual spray like enforcer, or by bombing...don't think that because youd dog doesn't go in a room fleas cant be in there, they can jump and easily head upstairs, can climb up curtains, and can easily make it under doors.
TREAT EVERY ROOM.
4: treat the yard if possible...we cant realy do this one with over 6 acres, farm animals, and wildlife contantly wandering through treating the yard wouldn't do much good...but if theres a small area he seems to frequent most, treat that area...
5: VACUME...daily for a minimum of 30 days. (the fleas life cycle is 28) you want to vacume up not only any deads, but any newly hatching eggs) always dump the bag/canister into a separate bag, tie closed and remove form he house as soon as your done...

if yosing a residual sprayin the house/bedding, repeat in about 28 days to do a fast kill any newly hatching eggs. the residuals are good anything for 3-6 onths depending on the product, but they do take a while to get thigns under control.
^^^^This.

Two or three years ago my pets - two rabbits and a dog - wound up with a BAD flea infestation. The rabbits weren't on any meds at the time, but my dog was on Revolution, yet he still wound up with fleas. The only way to effectively treat is to get them at multiple sources: the pet, the household (bedding, furniture, carpets, corners, etc. etc. etc.) and the outdoors. It took me about 2 months of multiple flea treatments on all three pets, multiple baths for all three (even though you shouldn't bath a rabbit, I had no choice), and hot water washes and treating just about everything in the house before I got them under control. I didn't treat the backyard, but thankfully in this case, the indoor and on-pet treatments were enough.

It takes a lot of diligence when a flea outbreak is particularly bad; the topical flea treatments on the pet, I find, can be effective in prevention before an outbreak begins, or if one has just barely started, if the topical treatment kills eggs as well as adults...but once the fleas establish themselves in the home (fleas feed off the host, but live in the environment around them, i.e., carpets, bedding), a lot more measures need to be taken.
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Old 09-14-2016, 01:41 PM
 
1,575 posts, read 806,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txdemo View Post
Had the same issue. Dog would have fleas after 2 weeks of using topical. Started using Nexgard chewable and haven't seen a flea since.
Some years ago we used the topicals (Advantage, all those), but about 7 or 8 years ago we switched to Zodiac collars, and we were very happy. And, I am smack in the middle of deer tick heaven. I hate those little buggers. A year ago I got two farm collie types who are very mouthy, so I didn't want to use the topicals or the Zodiac collars. We tried the NexGard oral tablets, and we are very happy with the results. I don't see fleas or ticks.

Theoretically, the chemical in NexGard only works for ticks after they bite the dog, but after using them for a couple of months, I stopped seeing the ticks altogether. It seems to have some repellant effect. Strange, but true.

Another thing I like about the NexGard is that there are fewer adverse affects noted than for the topicals. It could just be because its newer, IDK, but there are fewer "warning"s.
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Old 09-14-2016, 01:51 PM
 
1,575 posts, read 806,254 times
Reputation: 2569
Quote:
Originally Posted by bassetluv View Post
^^^^This.

Two or three years ago my pets - two rabbits and a dog - wound up with a BAD flea infestation. The rabbits weren't on any meds at the time, but my dog was on Revolution, yet he still wound up with fleas. The only way to effectively treat is to get them at multiple sources: the pet, the household (bedding, furniture, carpets, corners, etc. etc. etc.) and the outdoors. It took me about 2 months of multiple flea treatments on all three pets, multiple baths for all three (even though you shouldn't bath a rabbit, I had no choice), and hot water washes and treating just about everything in the house before I got them under control. I didn't treat the backyard, but thankfully in this case, the indoor and on-pet treatments were enough.

It takes a lot of diligence when a flea outbreak is particularly bad; the topical flea treatments on the pet, I find, can be effective in prevention before an outbreak begins, or if one has just barely started, if the topical treatment kills eggs as well as adults...but once the fleas establish themselves in the home (fleas feed off the host, but live in the environment around them, i.e., carpets, bedding), a lot more measures need to be taken.
BTW - foxywench and bassetluv have good advice. I tried giving them positive ratings on this - but for some reason that doesn't seem to be working today.

It is rare that a flea population will establish inside a house, but it does happen. And the fleas feed on the dog (or you), but breed and live in the carpet, or in the grass, or somewhere else. So getting rid of a bad flea problem means treating your house or yard. If they are in the house - you are likely getting bit as well as the dog. In your yard, maybe not. So what you are seeing is possibly the topical skin treatment being effective - but the flea infestation is so bad they are enough fleas you keep seeing them.

When I was a kid, my mother bred dogs. We would periodically give them a "dip". Basically a bath in a flea-killing solution. Had to get them soaked. We always made sure we treated the lawn as well, or in a week or two, we would have a problem all over again. That was a long time ago - but the basic concept is still sound. The treatments have changed.
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Old 09-14-2016, 03:10 PM
 
492 posts, read 517,945 times
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Nexgard is what I use. It isn't cheap by any means, but I used to use Advantage and those little green men were not working at all. Haven't had any ticks or any fleas since using Nexgard.
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Old 09-15-2016, 03:44 PM
 
13,401 posts, read 7,359,710 times
Reputation: 12384
A local woman posted about her JRT ending up in emergency over her first dose of Advantage. The previously healthy dog now has kidney failure and she is hoping she makes it. Not worth the risk, imo, to use these products. I use heartguard given a week before Nexguard on my dog.
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