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Old 10-10-2016, 05:47 PM
 
16,564 posts, read 13,977,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoHoVe View Post
An Akita would work if you can find someone who isn't breeding them to be ridiculously oversized these days. Loved my Akitas...very quite sensible "one man" dogs. Unfortunately I've maintained a multi pet household for years with fosters coming and going from time to time and Akitas generally arent well suited temperment wise for that.

Akitas and all other breeds aside unless you also require an intimidating appearence in the equation it kind of comes down to the individual dog. I have a spaniel border collie type cross who I hung on to specifically because hes such a great watch dog and has a tremendously intimadating bark.
Akitas are a good choice and there are many Akita rescues. OP I would suggest you add Shiba Inu to the list. Protective but miedium sized, typically fairly quiet, easy to train if you can get them to believe you are the boss.
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Old 10-11-2016, 02:31 AM
 
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Maybe its time for a chihuahua.
http://www.powerofchi.org/wp-content...huas-cover.jpg
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Old 10-11-2016, 03:30 AM
 
Location: North East England
304 posts, read 148,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
More important than breed I would consider adopting a young adult dog from rescue. You will know the energy level, barking level, trainability, and so on.

I have three shelties, all from rescue but my "best" dog is the one I got as an adult. She was 3 yrs old, and is nearly silent (unheard of in shelties), high energy (which I wanted as we run agility), is easier to train than all of the border collies I owned previously, and appreciates us the most.

Don't get me wrong, I love my other two, especially the one I have had since he was 4 months old, but neither he nor his sister (who we got at 9 months) will ever compete in agility, though he is training in flyball, and the sister barks like a nut.

If temperment really matters, an adult is a much surer bet. Oh and I forgot, she came potty trained!

An almost silent Sheltie.They are lovely dogs but very noisy and sadly many very nervous ones these days.Over here in the UK you dont see anything like the amount that you once did.
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Old 10-11-2016, 01:25 PM
 
15,149 posts, read 19,628,427 times
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I agree totally with foxywench's post below. I might also add that adopting an older dog is a great ideas for anyone, but especially for older people. I've always had older dogs and my last 3 rescue dobermans were all seniors: 7, 8 and 9 years old. They came with no baggage and each fit into my household without any problems. Opening up your heart and home to an older dog offers so many benefits. Once you so it, you'll be an older-dog-adopter forever.



Quote:
Originally Posted by foxywench View Post
an adult Doberman would probably suit you well, they are Velcro dogs, incredibly attuned to their people, they love a good run, but a fenced in yard and plenty of mental stimulation would be fine for a matue dober.
an adult rotty would also be a great choice.

neither have to be "protective" (though most are naturally good judges of when they need to step in) because they LOOK scary enough that most wont een think about crossing ya lol
My dober is the biggest sweetest goofball in the world..but people still cross the street and give us a wide birth when they see us simply because shes a dober.
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Old 10-12-2016, 12:54 PM
 
1,166 posts, read 547,787 times
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If the OP enjoys the lab personality and likes large dogs, a Bernese Mountain Dog might be a good fit.


Low to moderate exercise requirements and activity level
Affectionate, loyal, most bark very little, they bond to their humans and love to be with them, good with people, animals, children
They are large 100lbs+, mostly black and even though they aren't guard dogs per se, only a dog breed expert or someone with a death wish would willingly mess with one.


As someone that bred and trained GSDs for a couple decades, the typical guarding breeds can be too intense for some people. They will be constantly on alert, bark at anything they think is unusual and their imposing size, appearance and reputation can be an issue with family or friends and make it difficult if you need to find rental housing.
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Old 10-12-2016, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Left coast
2,321 posts, read 1,190,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phxone View Post
If the OP enjoys the lab personality and likes large dogs, a Bernese Mountain Dog might be a good fit.


Low to moderate exercise requirements and activity level
Affectionate, loyal, most bark very little, they bond to their humans and love to be with them, good with people, animals, children
They are large 100lbs+, mostly black and even though they aren't guard dogs per se, but only a dog breed expert or someone with a death wish would mess with one.


As someone that bred and trained GSDs for a couple decades, the typical guarding breeds can be too much for most people. They will be constantly on alert, bark at anything they think is unusual and their imposing size, appearance and reputation can be an issue with family, friends and make it difficult if you need to find rental housing.

new to this thread (haven't read thru all of it!) but wanted to chip in my 2cents re: Berners-

One thing with Berners, they can tend to shyness, even with proper handling, and also in general they are fairly sensitive- this can be an issue if you a handling a 130lb male, its really different handling a gentle, sensitive yet very strong dog --

a world away in temperament and handling needs, from -say- my bossy female giant schnauzer...
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Old 10-15-2016, 03:33 PM
 
7,981 posts, read 3,412,741 times
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I have a shihtzu/pooldle mix he is a real lap dog. He really only likes to walk twice a day and then for only a block or two. He is a great dog for me. Doesn't bark unless someone rings the bell or he hears noises. Great disposition.
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Old 10-15-2016, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Under the Milky Way
1,149 posts, read 796,467 times
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A Bouvier des Flandres might be worth a look. I know someone who had one; he was a wonderful dog. They are big but not "scary," yet would definitely protect their family if necessary. They're also smart, gentle, and calm.

Someone mentioned a Cane Corso upthread. As an owner of one, I don't recommend them unless you are willing to spend a LOT of time on socialization and obedience training. They are great dogs, but also stubborn and need an owner who is definitely in charge. Another consideration is that some places wouldn't rent to people who own this breed.
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Old 10-15-2016, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,488 posts, read 8,338,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TFW46 View Post
I agree totally with foxywench's post below. I might also add that adopting an older dog is a great ideas for anyone, but especially for older people. I've always had older dogs and my last 3 rescue dobermans were all seniors: 7, 8 and 9 years old. They came with no baggage and each fit into my household without any problems. Opening up your heart and home to an older dog offers so many benefits. Once you so it, you'll be an older-dog-adopter forever.
I love old dogs! But then again I'm not as young as I used to be either, so we get on well that way.
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Old 10-15-2016, 09:11 PM
 
1,830 posts, read 4,841,000 times
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Great suggestions and advice! Thank you, all! Good reminder that it's harder to find rental housing when you own certain breeds. Right now I own, but later, IF I can ever sell and move, most likely would be to a rental. Adopted my last two dogs (lab mixes) when they were about 6 years old. I vote for adopting an older dog but often the bond isn't as close and you don't know what the dog will do in all situations. The dogs I adopted as puppies were predictable and we could really "read" each other. I also need a dog that would get along with my two cats. Thinking maybe a small to mid sized breed would be better for me or perhaps no dog (perish that thought, being dogless!). I'm in no rush as old Hobbs will probably be around awhile longer (I hope).
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