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Old 11-07-2016, 01:19 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
13,780 posts, read 18,685,586 times
Reputation: 24345

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There was a story about this animal boarding facility and that they are looking for three Chihuahuas that got loose from their boarding facility . Apparently their owners are on vacation and they left them there thinking they would be safe . As soon as my husband heard the story and said "that my friends is why I don't board my animals " . You wonder how safe this place was to begin with . I remember a couple of years ago I saw a dog running down the street directly down from a boarding place and I pulled over and tried to get it , another lady got him and said "well I guess I have another dog " and I said to her don't you think you should go over to the facility and see if he is someones dog ? You know that woman told me to mind my own business . But anyways that does make me wonder how safe these places are for our family members . And how many if any of us have boarded dogs and never gotten them back ? and then you wonder could they still be living with someone ?
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Old 11-07-2016, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
23,272 posts, read 28,076,984 times
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I don't think all boarding facilities should be tarred with the same brush.

Our current dog boards in a plush facility at the vet practice we use.

Our elderly diabetic girl who died a couple of years ago went to a facility where the owner lived in an apartment over the kennel. Godiva was taken upstairs with the owner at night to be fed, given her insulin, and sleep.

Do your due diligence before choosing where to board.
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Old 11-07-2016, 02:08 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
22,505 posts, read 28,416,758 times
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I know that a dachshund escaped from a local boarding kennel and was killed on the highway. It doesn't happen very often, though. I helped vet assistants capture an escaped dog that was headed home on his own. Those are the only 2 escapes I know of. Most kennels have double gate systems to thwart escapes.

I used to do boarding kennel inspections and respond when there was a complaint about them. I would be extremely careful about leaving my dog at a boarding kennel. We got lots of complaints about switched cats, but it is what you don't see that you have to be careful about. The very worst kennel had this gorgeous landscaping and a dozen large kennels with nice runs that they would show to customers.

Then they would accept over 300 dogs on holidays and stack the dogs 4-5 deep in the basement and garage and didn't clean cages. They charged every dog for a bath. They said it was to remove any fleas as the dogs entered, but it was to wash off feces and urine as the dog was picked up.

Fortunately, none of the others were anywhere near as bad, but the majority of them had issues that would have upset pet owners.

The only one I would have used belonged to a Dutch woman (complete with wooden shoes and incomprehensible thick accent). The kennel was in an old building. Actual kennels were saggy old chain link. Supper dishes were old and dented. It looked run down, but she cleaned non-stop. I swear you could eat off the floor in that kennel. There was never one spot of dirt.

Each dog was taken out on a leash and walked. Dogs that stayed there loved her. But you might not pick that kennel if you to a brief glance because equipment was old.
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Old 11-07-2016, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
4,704 posts, read 10,126,357 times
Reputation: 8525
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
I don't think all boarding facilities should be tarred with the same brush.

Our current dog boards in a plush facility at the vet practice we use.

Our elderly diabetic girl who died a couple of years ago went to a facility where the owner lived in an apartment over the kennel. Godiva was taken upstairs with the owner at night to be fed, given her insulin, and sleep.

Do your due diligence before choosing where to board.
Kudos for the above post!

^ Let me ask the OP so just what do you suggest people do with dogs when they need to go away for what ever reason?

Dogs get away from dog sitters to so guess they are out too even when left with family or good friends dogs can escape,

Take the dog with you? Not only will that limit what you are able to do but look how many dogs get lost while traveling or how many dogs either escape or die in car accidents.

You could be home or traveling when a bad natural disaster strikes and dogs can get away or die so it seems to me just like each one of us they are never 100% safe.

To say do not board a dog it might get away is no different then saying do not get on a plane it might crash,or do not go to Paris as terrorist might bomb something. Life is full of risks and you are not even safe at home. You can let fear cripple you or you can live and enjoy life.

When boarding you need to check the places out but as there are plenty of good responsible kennels.
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Old 11-07-2016, 03:39 PM
 
13,355 posts, read 7,343,654 times
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I agree with Suzy that not all boarding facilities are the same and due diligence is needed. That said, I recall the news reporting that a hawk had swooped down and taken a small dog being boarded. Truly heartbreaking for all involved although the same thing can and does happen when in the care of the owners as well.

The most heartbreaking boarding story was a couple of years ago, possibly in AZ, where the boarding facility owners went on vacation with a facility full of dogs. They left their daughter and son in law to care for the animals. Sadly, there was a fire and all of the dogs perished.
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Old 11-07-2016, 03:42 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
13,780 posts, read 18,685,586 times
Reputation: 24345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dashdog View Post
Kudos for the above post!

^ Let me ask the OP so just what do you suggest people do with dogs when they need to go away for what ever reason?

Dogs get away from dog sitters to so guess they are out too even when left with family or good friends dogs can escape,

Take the dog with you? Not only will that limit what you are able to do but look how many dogs get lost while traveling or how many dogs either escape or die in car accidents.

You could be home or traveling when a bad natural disaster strikes and dogs can get away or die so it seems to me just like each one of us they are never 100% safe.

To say do not board a dog it might get away is no different then saying do not get on a plane it might crash,or do not go to Paris as terrorist might bomb something. Life is full of risks and you are not even safe at home. You can let fear cripple you or you can live and enjoy life.

When boarding you need to check the places out but as there are plenty of good responsible kennels.

Wow I was just repeating what was on the local news last night and it got me to thinking is all and was wondering what other people thought . Jeeze , I'm not saying any of that just repeating what was on the news . Go overboard much ?
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Old 11-07-2016, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Northeastern U.S.
1,465 posts, read 886,874 times
Reputation: 2914
Questions I would ask at any new boarding kennel I was considering:

Where are the kennels (i.e. where the dogs are) in relationship to the home? (if there's a fire, I want the people to be aware of it ASAP and be able to get to the dogs fast) I wouldn't pick a kennel where the kennel owners live up the road or across the field from the kennels.

Is there someone on the premises 24/7 (if not, forget it)?

How many people caring for the animals being boarded, and how many animals are there?

What happens if my dog gets sick late on a Saturday night; do you have an emergency vet to go to, and how far away is that vet? (I started asking this after a very bad situation where a kennel owner caring for my dogs apparently didn't have a plan when one of the dogs became very ill on a Sunday morning). The kennel must have a plan for inconvenient sudden illnesses/injuries.

I am very satisfied with the kennel where I occasionally board my dog now; it's part of the owners' home, there's always someone there, my dog goes in and out of a small fenced yard all the time and has house privileges.
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Old 11-07-2016, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,472 posts, read 43,566,158 times
Reputation: 47208
The few times we've had to board we thoroughly inspected the entire premises. Any place which doesn't allow that will not get my business. Now so many places have closed circuit TV so people can watch their furbabies any time they want. Good idea.
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Old 11-08-2016, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
3,563 posts, read 5,705,858 times
Reputation: 4225
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
The few times we've had to board we thoroughly inspected the entire premises. Any place which doesn't allow that will not get my business. Now so many places have closed circuit TV so people can watch their furbabies any time they want. Good idea.
Great advice AND ask questions...not just about the protocols of the specific facility but about dogs in general. Try to get a feel for how knowledgeable the kennel attendants REALLY are. Avoid places with stuff like loud music blasting ect...the animals needs should be placed above the employees.

Another tip would be if they make an announcement over the intercom that there is a tour in progress (these can be very discreet). People working on the clock shouldn't need a heads up to know when to start acting appropriately imho. An announcement isnt NECESSARILY proof of a troubled facility but employers who run a tight ship and expect overall professionalism from their employees don't typically need to
give them a heads up.

Last edited by SoHoVe; 11-08-2016 at 07:00 PM..
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