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Old 02-26-2008, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Florida
1,738 posts, read 7,501,510 times
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I got a cat in college and a dog around the middle of my masters degree.
I will not tell you one way or the other. But when we got our dog we were married and a masters degree is much different then a bachelors. Less classes, no gen eds, and a little more free time ...minus the papers that are best written at 3am in the morning(pup was asleep tho).

A cat during my undergrad was so perfect!!!! He was cute, silly, kinda bouncy and full of energy but not needy. ....he only got needy when he got older(interesting....)

best of luck in your decision

read the book marley and me!
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Old 02-26-2008, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Jax
8,204 posts, read 32,179,157 times
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Vudupins, have you ever had a Black Lab?

I have had a Black Lab and right now have a 1/2 Chocolate Lab-1/2 Pit bull and she's the craziest dog of my 3.......and trust me, it's not the 1/2 pit side that's crazy, it's the 1/2 lab side!

Talk about energy! My girl will be 7 years old later this year and we just brought a younger dog (barely 2 yrs) into the home and it's the 1/2 lab who's wearing out the younger dog!

I have lived in NYC myself (now in FL), so I know what city living is like and I cannot imagine trying to keep a big lab in a Manhattan apartment......I know people do it, but is that really an optimal life for a dog?

What's the rush? Enjoy your college years and your freedom, there's plenty of time to settle down with a dog later.
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Old 02-27-2008, 03:30 AM
 
13,297 posts, read 25,491,832 times
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I echo those who suggest college/post-college is no time for a dog. After all, when you finish college, the dog will be in the peak of young adulthood in terms of exercise needs. And where will you be living/going? A dog is about a 15-year promise.
Maybe you could indulge a dog fix by volunteering at the nearest shelter to walk dogs. They'd love it and you could really help dogs and be around them. Everyone I know that ever got a dog in college ended up dumping it on parents (if possible) or taking it to a shelter to be adopted.
There will be a time to have a dog or dogs, as you obviously love them. But taking one in college is not the time. Ask anyone who sees the homeless animals when the school ends for the summer.
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Old 02-27-2008, 08:15 AM
 
5,640 posts, read 17,291,506 times
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Hey - a thought. Go to work for a dogsitter/dogwalker or a vet for extra money.

Keeping a dog is very expensive for yearly shots, and then if something goes wrong with them. (puppies have been known to swallow foreign objects)... it is really $$$.
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Old 02-27-2008, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Florida
1,738 posts, read 7,501,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riveree View Post
Vudupins, have you ever had a Black Lab?

Talk about energy! My girl will be 7 years old later this year and we just brought a younger dog (barely 2 yrs) into the home and it's the 1/2 lab who's wearing out the younger dog!

I will never own a lab because the energy is so high during the early years and it's a different type of energy. It's a bull in a china shop type of energy. It's amazing! our guy has energy but it is easy to direct.
lab owners amaze me w/ their patience
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Old 02-27-2008, 03:17 PM
 
6,307 posts, read 7,437,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kelly3120 View Post
I will never own a lab because the energy is so high during the early years and it's a different type of energy. It's a bull in a china shop type of energy. It's amazing! our guy has energy but it is easy to direct.
lab owners amaze me w/ their patience
All of the labs that I've known well personally have been WAY more on the disciplined side. With that being said though, I believe that a lot of that has to do with the way that they were raised (VERY hands-on) and the fact that they always had proper outlets for their energy.

Getting one when you know you won't have a ton of time to spend with them (especially during the early years) is just a recipe for disaster.
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Old 02-27-2008, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Chicago
6,021 posts, read 13,523,425 times
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I'm gonna agree w/ everyone else and say I would highly recommend not getting a dog right now. it's just the wrong breed, the wrong point in life, the wrong city, the wrong major, etc. you're picking a large high energy dog and living in a city w/ mostly apartments and most likely size restrictions for those apartments. as a film major, you may have to move around a lot (esp. if you are going to be a director-people are shooting movies all over the world now) which is hard to do w/ a dog, let alone a large breed dog. and at this point in your life, it's best to be as burden-free as possible (hey, what if your school offers study abroad programs? hard to do those w/ a dog at home).

ETA: I know you said that you aren't very social, but if you are going into film, that's gonna have to change soon! I'm in school for writing, so I can be as reclusive, misanthropic as I want (I swear, I'm not hat bad ), but unless you are doing screenwriting, your major is going to require you work w/ screenwriters, actors, directors, and all sorts of other people. this major will likely require a lot of networking, which is next to impossible if you become a dog walking recluse

honestly, I wouldn't really get a pet at all, since all of them, even a gold fish, will limit your options (unless you have the cash to spend on dog walkers/pet sitters). if you must get some type of pet, I'd recommend an easy to care for freshwater fish or caged pet like a mouse or hamster (NOT a ferret, rat, rabbit, etc. those require a lot more work). a cat could be good too if, again, you have the cash to pay pet sitters when necessary (just make sure you don't get a "needy" breed like a Siamese which can be very dog like).

if you feel you MUST have a dog (trust me, you don't), opt for a smaller, under 25lbs breed that will be easy to rent w/ and can be tucked into a carry-on pet bag if you plan on traveling by plane a lot
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Old 02-28-2008, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Beautiful place in Virginia
2,658 posts, read 10,464,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vudupins View Post

So, all that considered, do you think this is a good idea (or at least not a bad one)? I'm actually considering getting two puppies so they'll have each other when I'm gone and won't be too lonely. What do you think of that as well?
Not a good idea - especially two dogs. I have been in school and training for 14 years of my life (undergrad, med school, internship, residency). There was no way to financially or emotionally take on the responsibility of a pet.

Unless you are financially independent - it's hard enough to pay for school, live and do basic stuff like buy food to eat. You will easily rack up thousands of dollars in expenses in the course of 10-15 years. You cannot travel unless you board your pet...there are basic maintenance cost and not to even consider the medical bills. Your housing options are already limited in the city and having a pet increases the level of difficulty. You will also need the deposit which can be rather high - and higher if your dog damages something in the apartment.

One thing you can do is try to foster a pet through a rescue (although I never did it), it would give you exposure to the pet - but give you a lot shorter commitment.
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Old 02-29-2008, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,237,494 times
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I have an aquaintance who is 25 and in college. He got a big dog last year and the poor dog is neglected. He's gone 12 - 15 hours per day, travels a lot, and dumps the dog on other people most of the time. The dog doesn't even seem to react to him as a companion/owner.

I'll never in my lifetime understand why people get dogs when they don't have the time or intent to take care of them. In the 8 years I've had my dog, she's only been left to a live-in care taker twice due to extreme circumstances where both of us had to be out of town at the same time. We know she wouldn't do well in a kennel, so we hire a dog sitter if the situation comes up. One of us drives home every work day at lunch to take her for a walk, she's walked in the morning, afterwork, and before bedtime. A dog isn't a cat and they need a lot of attention and to feel like they're part of your "pack". If you're not a "home-body", don't get a dog. If no one is in your house for more than 9 or 10 hours per day, don't get a dog. If you like to go to the lake or mountains every weekend, don't get a dog.
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Old 02-29-2008, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Loss Wages
1,311 posts, read 5,998,280 times
Reputation: 562
I don't think the poster has responded since the original post.

Was any of this helpful, vudupins?
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