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Old 02-28-2008, 09:25 PM
 
Location: The Lakes Region
3,074 posts, read 4,089,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandycat View Post
Hi,
We have two small kids, (4 and 14 months), I'm a stay at home mom, husband works a lot, we have a house (not fenced yard), we don't travel much. I think we are ready. How can I be sure?

Also, any thoughts on getting a puggle from a breeder vs good old fashioned shelter puppy or dog? The puggle would be a 2 hour drive one way, $400 for the dog, plus all the upcoming vet things including spay. We saw a few shelter dogs for under $200 that are UTD on vacs and already altered. I really love the puggle variety, but maybe a mutt would be suitable.

We are somewhat new to dog ownership, we just had them as kids growing up. I don't want to just jump into something like this without really considering all the details that I might be missing. TIA!
If your asking your not ready...Please don't suport puppie mills...When your ready get a shelter dog. a good rescue group will help you get the right dog for your family. You can't tie up a dog, you need a fenced yard.....

Carrie
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Old 02-28-2008, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Florida
1,738 posts, read 7,496,319 times
Reputation: 665
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pawporri View Post
If your asking your not ready...Please don't suport puppie mills...When your ready get a shelter dog. a good rescue group will help you get the right dog for your family. You can't tie up a dog, you need a fenced yard.....

Carrie
not to be mean but I think that's a little harsh.
She's researching before she acts.I wondered if I was ready for kids and then progressed ...I consider it intelligent and responsible of her. I think I wrote a google in on "am I ready for a dog" when I got one. I haven't given my dog up and those that know me a little know he's very well taken care of.

I disagree again in the tie up part too. As long as she's walking,playing,puppy parks,etc. she can tie th dog up supervised successfully. I tie up my dog in the front yard when I work out there so he can be with me. I'm not a bad owner. My sibs tie up their dogs and they are very happy

Sometimes I think we care so much we try to control people and discourage them rather then encourage them to make changes in the world. I understand that we worry so much about the adopted dogs well being, but it's being given a chance to live a life as a pet dog. Humans, while some are horrible, many are amazing wonderful people!

Last edited by kelly3120; 02-28-2008 at 09:49 PM.. Reason: deleted other message ..it was the same a duplicate
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Old 02-28-2008, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Jax
8,204 posts, read 32,158,255 times
Reputation: 3392
Look at what Titanium said about how much he's already spent on his recent Bichon rescue. I've spent about half of that (a little less than $1000) already on an abandoned dog I took in roughly 5 months ago.

Dogs can be expensive. If you don't have the fence in place, and then you suddenly realize you need it, will you be able to have one put in? Will there still be money left over for vet care?

I'm not saying the OP should not get a dog, we all know there are dogs that need good homes, I'm just saying that we have to be realistic about what dogs really need....they need more than just love.
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Old 02-29-2008, 04:39 AM
 
Location: Beautiful place in Virginia
2,658 posts, read 10,456,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandycat View Post

The fence thing does pose a slight problem since fencing in our yard will cost about $2,000 or more. But we live in NC where the weather is mostly mild. I'm not a wuss and can walk a dog a couple of times a day.
Don't let the fence issue be the limiting factor. I walk my dog twice a day. On the weekends, I take him for a 2-3 mile walk. Read that book "Paws to Consider" since it shows which dogs really need the walk. Consider your lifestyle and narrow down the choice of the breed.

I live in a golf course community (we are right on the golf course) and I didn't opt for a fence. There is water with a little 'gator'. Occassionally, I use a tie out (ground stakes) but it's only when we are working in the yard. I don't leave him out unsupervised since he could theoretically get hit by a golf ball or eaten by the 'gator'.
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Old 02-29-2008, 05:16 AM
 
2,008 posts, read 5,222,561 times
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It's kind of funny. I did less thinking about whether we are ready for kids, lol.

Thanks to whomever said that I am being responsible. We want to make a responsible decision and the right decision for our family. When the time is right, you can be sure that we will not be buying a dog from a petstore, or a puppy mill, or some other seedy breeding operation. More than likely we will get one from a rescue or shelter.

I mostly agree with the poster about the JRT. No offense, but I am not a fan of those dogs. My husband would really want one, but I told him he'd have to quit his job to take care of one. They are just too high maintenance for me, although the foster mom said this one is real mellow. I just want a cute, loving house dog that will go for walks and hikes and play ball and go on road trips with us. I think we will wait until we make the commitment to fence in the yard, maybe this spring. I think it would make my life a ton easier. We just moved into our new house, so I think the thought of getting a dog "completes the picture" if you know what I mean. But we do have a lot of love to give, we can afford it, and I think a dog would add a great deal to our lives.
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Old 08-18-2008, 07:12 PM
 
4 posts, read 7,475 times
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Default Puggles

Hi
My dog passed away at 16 years old and I debated about getting another dog. I went to the pound 2 years later and saw this cute little big eyed 4 month old puppymix. I am known for having nice dogs. It turned out this dog was a PUGGLE and I have given her away 4 times and got her back.. They are known as being stubborn, hard to train, and hyperactive, and a poor memory. I finally bought a shocker collar for her and I am getting results. On that DOGGY DAYCARE SERIES on TV they even said Puggles are put into timeout more often than all the other dogs combined. They don't have an off button in their brain. Do yourself a favor and talk to your vet about a good choice for yourself and your children. I often joke about my dog having attention deficit syndrome on steroids. I can't take my eyes off of her for a moment as she will get into something. They need to run alot so they would be a good dog for a jogger or someone who rides bicycles alot. Good luck with your decision. The dog pounds are getting Puggles regularly because they are so high maintenance.

Last edited by SADIEFEMALE; 08-18-2008 at 07:19 PM.. Reason: last comment
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Old 08-18-2008, 07:37 PM
 
Location: "The Sunshine State"
4,334 posts, read 12,197,571 times
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I would wait until the kids are all in school and a fenced yard is a must with any dog owner!
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Old 08-18-2008, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 34,290,368 times
Reputation: 7073
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandycat View Post
Hi,
We have two small kids, (4 and 14 months), I'm a stay at home mom, husband works a lot, we have a house (not fenced yard), we don't travel much. I think we are ready. How can I be sure?

Also, any thoughts on getting a puggle from a breeder vs good old fashioned shelter puppy or dog? The puggle would be a 2 hour drive one way, $400 for the dog, plus all the upcoming vet things including spay. We saw a few shelter dogs for under $200 that are UTD on vacs and already altered. I really love the puggle variety, but maybe a mutt would be suitable.

We are somewhat new to dog ownership, we just had them as kids growing up. I don't want to just jump into something like this without really considering all the details that I might be missing. TIA!
How much free time do you have left over after taking care of your children?

A puppy will take the rest of it and then some. You're the only one who really knows if you are ready and it sounds like you're the one who will be the primary caregiver. Just keep in mind that a puppy demands a lot of care-giving. I swear, I think human babies are easier. There's a great book by Richard Wolters called "Family Dog." Try reading it and decide if you have the time to do the puppy thing the right way.
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Old 08-18-2008, 09:31 PM
 
3,627 posts, read 12,781,834 times
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I have had puppies and young kids but I had a good bit of dog experience before I had the kids.

Puppies are a challenge - all puppies bite and need to be trained not to and are an incredible hanfdul. With small kids toys get everywhere and puppies eat everything. With kids as small as yours taking on a puppy right now could be exasperating. {I was a stay at home mom too}

I think your best success could bea young adult dog screened to be good with kids. Breed rescue may be a way to go. Also, sometimes breeders have a dog that may not be what they wanted for breeding but has had extensive socialization and is otherwise a good dog - a lot of them hold onto promising stock and sell for reasonable price if not what they were expecting. Rescue / Shelter is another option but you REALLY want that dog screened like no tommorrow as you cannot afford issues! But without dog experience, you may be creating issues with a new puppy too.

I would tend to stay away from too small with small kids - like not a toy size - maybe something more medium. One good site about puppies and kids is Leerburg - it is targeted for working dog owners but there are lots of good articles on general puppy raising www.leerburg.com

When you mix together breeds of dogs to create a new breed the outcome is unpredictable - if someone is serious about it they need to know about dog breeding, culling extensively, and doing several generations worth. Not sure what the attraction is for the "puggle" but ...........breeding is tricky business and I think most people just throw these dogs together to make a buck.

The thing about the underground fence - they are great if you are outside WITH the dog - and never leave the dog outside unattended - it does not keep out other dogs, lightning can set them off, many dogs learn to take the shock and run the fence, some kid comes in your yard and gets bit - well there was no fence to keep the kid out...........etc. etc. I have had dogs without fences before but life is a LOT easier with a good fence.

Concerning tie ups - many states are enacting laws preventing that and tied up dogs tend towards agression - tie up may be ok if you are out there at the time but never leave a tied up dog unattended. Dog pens are great ideas if you can't do a fence. Just make sure the dog does not wind up living in it but it sure buys you some time to get the dog out from underfoot.

Last edited by grannynancy; 08-18-2008 at 09:41 PM..
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Old 08-19-2008, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Sunny Florida
7,136 posts, read 10,978,469 times
Reputation: 9459
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandycat View Post
Hi,
We have two small kids, (4 and 14 months), I'm a stay at home mom, husband works a lot, we have a house (not fenced yard), we don't travel much. I think we are ready. How can I be sure?

Also, any thoughts on getting a puggle from a breeder vs good old fashioned shelter puppy or dog? The puggle would be a 2 hour drive one way, $400 for the dog, plus all the upcoming vet things including spay. We saw a few shelter dogs for under $200 that are UTD on vacs and already altered. I really love the puggle variety, but maybe a mutt would be suitable.

We are somewhat new to dog ownership, we just had them as kids growing up. I don't want to just jump into something like this without really considering all the details that I might be missing. TIA!
Good morning! I'm glad you are giving this decision so much thought because it is a big commitment. Our kids started their campaign to get a dog when they were 5 and 7, but we just weren't ready. We did a lot of research and waited until they were 10 and 12 before getting our first dog. We didn't have a fenced yard at that time, but since our Tiger was a house dog, it wasn't an issue. We simply let him outside on a staked rope to do his business, watched, and let him back in. The whole process only took a few minutes, so it is doable without a fence, but it requires more of you.

Research before you get your first dog. Look for a breed that fits with your family's life style not just one that you find visually pleasing. Talk to people who have the breed you're considering and get their input. You don't want a very active dog in a house full of couch potatoes or vice versa. We wanted a small, mild-mannered, quiet, non-shedding, laid back, house dog that would be good with our kids. Tiger, our maltese, is all of these things and more, so our research really paid off.

One issue I haven't seen addressed is shedding. If you want a house dog, I strongly urge you to get a non-shedding one. You wouldn't believe how much hair accumulates each day and where it ends up - on your clothes, furniture, floors, toys, etc. If you don't want to sweep up hair on a daily basis or if you're kind of particular about cleanliness, you might not want to get a dog that sheds.

Dogs can be expensive and quite time consuming especially if you get a puppy. You'll need to socialize and housebreak a pup which doesn't always go as outlined in the books you'll read. Then there are shots, heartworm tests, heartworm/flee prevention meds, spay/neuter costs, and other unexpected vet bills. If your budget is tight you might not want to get a puppy until you have more disposable income.

I hope you find not only the perfect dog for your family, but also the perfect timing. I know we would've loved to have a dog when our kids were smaller, but we just didn't have the time to dedicate to a dog until they were a bit older. It's a big commitment, kind of like taking on a child that will never grow up, but it's wonderful. I never truly knew unconditional love until Tiger. I wish you well.
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