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Old 10-02-2018, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Watervliet, NY
4,173 posts, read 1,535,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
I was shocked to hear this from my friend today. Her small dog needs a cleaning and she's neglected this I guess due to costs, etc., anyway, she said dog is losing a couple teeth, but she said it would cost her $1K to $1.5K. Is this calif. costs or on the moon costs. She's getting her plastic ready for this charge.

I don't know how some people can maintain their animals.
Which teeth are being pulled? Some teeth require more extensive methods of extraction than others. Canine teeth (fang teeth) for example, will require more extensive efforts, because you have to cut into the gum line, and then stitch it up again after the tooth is removed. My cat had a cleaning plus 5 teeth removed (one was a canine tooth) 8 moths ago - all in all it cost $1,100, reduced to $991 due to the February Dental Month discount. This was in upstate NY. I also opted for the more intensive monitoring while she was anesthetized, which added $150 to the bill. My vet requires that for all animals 8 years and older, and she was just shy of her 8th birthday.
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Old 10-02-2018, 01:49 PM
 
Location: on the wind
6,806 posts, read 2,771,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grouse789 View Post
2. What do wolves and coyotes do for dental care? Is it the diet we feed our k9's? What if we only fed our dogs real meat? Would they get too much tartar build up?
For one thing, wild canines don't live nearly as long. Dental problems, including a hereditary tendency for them kills them young. Pets can live a long time despite dental problems...we just give them different food to compensate. Of course any wild canine can end up with bad teeth as they age. It's a common cause for deaths of predators, according to necropsies biologists do on such animals. I'm sure diet plays a big role especially while young when adult teeth are developing, but an individual wolf or coyote with a genetic predisposition to trouble doesn't have as much chance to produce as many offspring that may also have it.
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Old 10-02-2018, 03:28 PM
 
11,024 posts, read 8,443,479 times
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Originally Posted by grouse789 View Post
I didn't read through all the threads, so maybe someone already said this.
Two things, 1. Back in the wild 1970's my golden retriever got his shots as a pup, and neutered. Next time he saw the vet was to put him to sleep at age 13 due to bum hips. I was a kid at the time so not sure when all that changed to giving dogs dental care.
2. What do wolves and coyotes do for dental care? Is it the diet we feed our k9's? What if we only fed our dogs real meat? Would they get too much tartar build up?
Concerning #2, animals handle it according to their instincts. Some animals bite and chew on things as a means of clearing tartar. Whatever else that's left is just nature. Let nature be nature.
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Old 10-02-2018, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Riding a rock floating through space
1,857 posts, read 531,417 times
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Find another vet, that is horrendous price gouging. I had my Dachshunds teeth cleaned last summer for $140 and his teeth came out beautiful. That included sedation, pain meds and keeping him all day.
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Old 10-04-2018, 09:26 AM
 
3,918 posts, read 2,554,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grouse789 View Post
I didn't read through all the threads, so maybe someone already said this.
Two things, 1. Back in the wild 1970's my golden retriever got his shots as a pup, and neutered. Next time he saw the vet was to put him to sleep at age 13 due to bum hips. I was a kid at the time so not sure when all that changed to giving dogs dental care.
2. What do wolves and coyotes do for dental care? Is it the diet we feed our k9's? What if we only fed our dogs real meat? Would they get too much tartar build up?

Our family dog had dental work done in the 70s. Dental work for dogs isn't new but it is probably more prevalent now.


Bones help keep wolves and coyotes teeth clean but while they're related to dogs, their physiology isn't exactly the same especially for smaller dogs that tend to have more dental issues.
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Old 10-04-2018, 09:59 AM
 
943 posts, read 368,671 times
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A cleaning runs $400 in my area. That includes the $75 for bloodwork that has to be done every time. I have noticed one difference recently. I asked about the possibility of finding a broken or damaged tooth. I was told that rather than pull it I would be referred to a dental specialist for a root canal.
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Old 10-04-2018, 10:15 AM
 
16,567 posts, read 14,005,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grouse789 View Post
I didn't read through all the threads, so maybe someone already said this.
Two things, 1. Back in the wild 1970's my golden retriever got his shots as a pup, and neutered. Next time he saw the vet was to put him to sleep at age 13 due to bum hips. I was a kid at the time so not sure when all that changed to giving dogs dental care.
2. What do wolves and coyotes do for dental care? Is it the diet we feed our k9's? What if we only fed our dogs real meat? Would they get too much tartar build up?
Wolves eat bones, cartilage, sinew, skin, fur, feathers, etc. Dogs eat kibble.

My dogs who were raised on a raw food diet never needed teeth cleaning. The vet, who was initially downright lecturing about the dangers of raw food, told me when my one dog was 18, that he had never seen such good teeth on a dog his age.

BTW, wolves live 6-8 years on average in the wild. Dogs live much longer. It is unlikely the average wolf would live to see ill effects of bad teeth even if they do get them.
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Old 10-04-2018, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Riding a rock floating through space
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motownnative View Post
A cleaning runs $400 in my area. That includes the $75 for bloodwork that has to be done every time. I have noticed one difference recently. I asked about the possibility of finding a broken or damaged tooth. I was told that rather than pull it I would be referred to a dental specialist for a root canal.
Blood work does not HAVE to be done, the clinic I go to has it as an option. Even with the blood work that's over twice what my clinic charges. I'd call around, vet clinics are like car repair shops - most want to make as much as they can by charging very high rates and upselling you on stuff you don't really need, and some treat you fairly.
I just had my two 10 year old cats in for teeth cleaning, both had to have a few extractions. With (of course) sedation, pain meds and antibiotics the total bill came to $330. For both cats.
The only negative about my clinic is they are usually about a month out on appointments, while all the price gouging clinics can get you in within a couple days. I wonder why (sarcasm).

Last edited by duke944; 10-04-2018 at 12:07 PM..
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Old 10-04-2018, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Watervliet, NY
4,173 posts, read 1,535,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duke944 View Post
Blood work does not HAVE to be done, the clinic I go to has it as an option. Even with the blood work that's over twice what my clinic charges. I'd call around, vet clinics are like car repair shops - most want to make as much as they can by charging very high rates and upselling you on stuff you don't really need, and some treat you fairly.
I just had my two 10 year old cats in for teeth cleaning, both had to have a few extractions. With (of course) sedation, pain meds and antibiotics the total bill came to $330. For both cats.
The only negative about my clinic is they are usually about a month out on appointments, while all the price gouging clinics can get you in within a couple days. I wonder why (sarcasm).
No, but it is stupid not to. You can't tell just by looking whether or not there are issues that could be a problem when the animal gets put under. I do it, and I also have the more extensive monitoring done which, now that my cat is 8 years old, my vet will be mandating any time my cat needs anesthesia.
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Old 10-04-2018, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Riding a rock floating through space
1,857 posts, read 531,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ContraPagan View Post
No, but it is stupid not to. You can't tell just by looking whether or not there are issues that could be a problem when the animal gets put under. I do it, and I also have the more extensive monitoring done which, now that my cat is 8 years old, my vet will be mandating any time my cat needs anesthesia.
Good for you, it's nice you have an unlimited budget for your pets. Some people don't have that luxury though, and its a very awesome thing to find a clinic that doesn't price gouge. They are very rare but out there. If a clinic tells you blood work is a necessity that's a pretty good indicator they are full of bs and the type of outfit that is in it to suck you as dry as they can.
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