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Old 07-09-2017, 04:26 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,027 posts, read 827,452 times
Reputation: 3584

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Animals are very good at hiding pain. I had to put down a cat before her time. She lost some weight and wasn't eating. It didn't notice at first a about her not eating because I had two cat. I brought her in and it was liver failure. I really couldn't afford expensive treatments that may or may not help. I asked the vet if it's painful she said it is towards the end. I took her home for a few days. She never seemed in pain but yet just can't tell with animal. When she desperately tried to drink water and threw up I brought her in..4years ago and still hard.

Don't feel guilty, your dog has had a wonderful life with a caring owner. Putting her out of her pain is a caring gesture.
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Old 07-09-2017, 04:27 AM
 
34,242 posts, read 41,253,416 times
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Id try a new vet to get a more positive diagnosis of the problem before considering termination of the dog. We have a cat that is 14 years old and we love him dearly,last year he started exhibiting the same problems you are having with your dog,we thought it was the end as he would just lie down not eat or drink and was very lethargic, the vet asked us if there were any new things in the house like plants and it dawned on me there was a very large bunch of flowers on the kitchen table that were for mothers day,sure enough we discovered the cat had been eating the flowers and had poisoned himself as a consequence, tossed the flowers and within a few days his condition improved tremendously.All is well with Dusty.
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Old 07-09-2017, 04:40 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
14,655 posts, read 10,555,678 times
Reputation: 19791
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
There are so many reasons behind an elevated white blood cell count that I think that euthanasia is a bit of an overreaction at this point since you really don't know what is going on.

Reasons for High White Blood Cell Count in Dogs - Dogs Health Problems

If it were me, I would continue with the antibiotics, administer fluids at home, get her to eat and drink whenever and however I could and run more specific bloodwork (if her white blood cell numbers were less than 100,000) and/or have her x-rayed.

If you can't do that or provide follow-up treatment if she is chronically ill, then I would bring her to a no-kill shelter.
You think it's better for an elderly dog to be abandoned?!?!? No. A dog that can lose 15 pounds is a larger dog and the OP has had her 11 years so this is a dog where having an end stage disease is a very real possibility. The dog is already feeling physically miserable and your suggestion is to make her psychologically miserable also???? Sheesh. Climb down from your lofty perch and try to look at what message such an action would imprint on the dog.

I do think the antibiotics need to be given a chance to run their course but after that if the dog still continues to show signs of being miserable it's probably time to say goodbye.
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Old 07-09-2017, 04:48 AM
 
15,148 posts, read 19,666,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
...I do think the antibiotics need to be given a chance to run their course but after that if the dog still continues to show signs of being miserable it's probably time to say goodbye.

I agree. I hope the OP reads my post (post #4) about how my dog wouldnt eat after surgery due to antibiotics and how the vets and the surgeons thought her body was shutting down. Thank goodness I googled the antibiotics and saw that loss of appetite was one of the side effects. And thank goodness that, after a month of her having to be force-fed, her appetite came back after 18 hours of ending the antibiotics.

Last edited by TFW46; 07-09-2017 at 05:06 AM.. Reason: Edited to correct pesky typo
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Old 07-09-2017, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,563,716 times
Reputation: 4907
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
You think it's better for an elderly dog to be abandoned?!?!? No. A dog that can lose 15 pounds is a larger dog and the OP has had her 11 years so this is a dog where having an end stage disease is a very real possibility. The dog is already feeling physically miserable and your suggestion is to make her psychologically miserable also???? Sheesh. Climb down from your lofty perch and try to look at what message such an action would imprint on the dog.

I do think the antibiotics need to be given a chance to run their course but after that if the dog still continues to show signs of being miserable it's probably time to say goodbye.
WOW. I can't believe that you are telling me to climb down from my lofty perch. Your post reeks of self-righteousness and it is also a personal attack; you're a mod, you should know better.

I volunteer at a no-kill shelter so I take serious offense to the idea that bringing a pet to a shelter is "abandonment." There are many people who bring their pets to shelters when they can no longer care for them, and many of those animals are adopted by new, loving caregivers (myself included). If you shame people by using words like "abandonment," then you run the risk of encouraging people to euthanize their pets when they can no longer care for them.

Are you honestly saying that death is better than rehoming when someone cannot provide their dog with the appropriate medical care??!!

You have absolutely no idea how long this dog has left; you don't know the age or the breed of the dog nor do any of us know for sure what is going on with the dog medically. The OP stated that she did not have the financial resources to give the dog the care that she needs; she can't afford the x-rays that the vet prescribed nor any hospital stays.

So, yeah, I think she should bring the dog to a shelter where it can get the medical care it needs either from the shelter or from someone who can afford it.
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Old 07-09-2017, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,563,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PippySkiddles View Post
you should be ashamed for even typing that!
And you should be ashamed for being so intolerant of and for trying to shame someone for an opinion with which you do not agree.
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Old 07-09-2017, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Southeast Idaho
4,654 posts, read 15,737,854 times
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I think a few replies on here mean well, hoping they simply worded things incorrectly

I'm not going to tell you what you should do, but rather what I would do if in your shoes, and I've been in your shoes.

A few years ago I faced a similar situation with one of my dogs. We'd been out of town on family business and trusted friends watched over our pets for the few days we were gone. Older male all of a sudden took no interest in his food. Not that he was a dog who lived to eat, but he enjoyed it nonetheless.

So I thought perhaps adding some wet food would whet his appetite, for a day or so yes, but only as a band aid effect.

Short story, after blood work and trials on antibiotics, there was no positive change. My husband and I decided it was time to set him free of his pain and misery.

Could we have financially afforded further testing and possible chemo if needed? Yes, however chemo is hard enough on a human who has the ability to comprehend what's going on, whereas a pet does not. That said, we'll never choose that path as we feel it's unfair.

To the nay-sayers, please no bashing on myself or the OP. My reply is for the OP, not to start any heated conversation. If you elect to criticize my reply, be warned you will be reported for violating TOS
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Old 07-09-2017, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Dallas
5,599 posts, read 4,905,054 times
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Thank you all for taking the time to respond.

Update: yesterday I boiled some chicken and gave her broth and chicken meat, which she eagerly ate - breakfast and supper. However, there were two huge diarrhea messes during the night, so it may have been too much after not eating for so long.

This morning I gave her clear chicken broth, which she lapped up. I'll try it again later and see how she tolerates it.
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Old 07-09-2017, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,027 posts, read 827,452 times
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I'm so happy for you. Sounds like there was a bit of a turnaround. That's good news. Maybe he just got into something he shouldn't have..
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Old 07-10-2017, 07:57 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
14,655 posts, read 10,555,678 times
Reputation: 19791
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
WOW. I can't believe that you are telling me to climb down from my lofty perch. Your post reeks of self-righteousness and it is also a personal attack; you're a mod, you should know better.

I volunteer at a no-kill shelter so I take serious offense to the idea that bringing a pet to a shelter is "abandonment." There are many people who bring their pets to shelters when they can no longer care for them, and many of those animals are adopted by new, loving caregivers (myself included). If you shame people by using words like "abandonment," then you run the risk of encouraging people to euthanize their pets when they can no longer care for them.
Those are the very words used by shelter workers, including at no-kill shelters, use all the time privately and publicly when someone drops off their elderly/older dog when they feel they can no longer afford the medical care of their pet. There are scathing, lecturing blog posts, forum posts, and "open letters" by some shelter worker or foster parent all over the internet, often complete with pictures, lamenting that they gave love and comfort to the poor, sick "abandoned" dog while he was put down because he was deserted by his heartless scum of an owner who got rid of him in the hour of his greatest need because he became inconvenient or expensive. The words "doing the right thing for your best friend" in some format are usually added in there somewhere.

I too volunteer at a no-kill shelter. These facilities don't have infinite capacity, it may not be true at the one you volunteer in, but most turn away more animals than they take in. Many have ended up resorting to installing cameras to prevent unauthorized drop offs. Plus, the term "no-kill" is not quite accurate. What they mean is they won't euthanize a healthy adoptable dog. Again, maybe not the one you volunteer at, but at the ones I know of most will have a vet who decides which dogs do need to be humanely euthanized because of health or aggression.

We have a program in our area, which I contribute to, that provides grants for owners who can't afford their pet's needed non-standard medical care. It's a great program and I wish we saw more of this instead of people being forced to hand their beloved pet over to organizations. However, I do want to point out, those grants aren't given unless the dog can recover.

Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
Are you honestly saying that death is better than rehoming when someone cannot provide their dog with the appropriate medical care??!!
No, but I am saying that they are better off being euthanized with their loving owner there to comfort them than stuck in a kennel with a bunch of other stressed out dogs surrounding them until the workers figure out whether they can be helped and then euthanized. Which, in reality, is the scenario that happens more often than not. And, if they are taken to the regular animal shelter that is practically guaranteed to happen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
You have absolutely no idea how long this dog has left; you don't know the age or the breed of the dog nor do any of us know for sure what is going on with the dog medically.
No, I don't but the OP, who clearly loves and cares about the dog and has been spending money they are struggling to afford, does know more about those things than anyone else responding. They are helplessly watching their dog suffer and trying to figure out the best course of action, and that is a very painful situation. The last thing they want to hear is that they should hand their dog over to strangers and hope they get taken care of.

Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
The OP stated that she did not have the financial resources to give the dog the care that she needs; she can't afford the x-rays that the vet prescribed nor any hospital stays.

So, yeah, I think she should bring the dog to a shelter where it can get the medical care it needs either from the shelter or from someone who can afford it.
There are times when too much is done to increase the dog's life by a couple of months. Some vets do try to presuade owners into doing expensive treatments that are nothing more than just doing it for the sake of doing it and are of speculative value. I adopt older dogs, if I have ever regretted my timing in sending the dog across the rainbow bridge it has been that I waited too long and therefore allowed the dog to suffer too long.

As I said, they needed to let the antibiotics run their course before any decisions where made, and it looks thankfully like the dog has turned a corner. So this situation is resolved, and in the best way possible.
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