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Old 09-06-2017, 06:35 PM
 
16,568 posts, read 14,010,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
This is what I'm using. I'm feeding regular food (people food), based on the recommendations here:

http://dels.nas.edu/resources/static..._final_fix.pdf


She's looking much better since I took her off kibble. I had been feeding her grain-free food. I now feed her meat twice a day (lean chicken or fish) and beans/rice/veggies for lunch. She often also gets a little fruit when I eat some.

She just looks so much better since i've feeding her "real food," as opposed to mystery kibble -even if it's expensive kibble - it's still dried who-knows-what.
I prefer a home made diet for the most part too. What are you doing for a calcium supplement?

Btw, rice is a grain. I personally don't avoid grains for my dogs, rice and raw oats are part of their diets regularly here but I think a lot of people have a knee jerk reaction to grains for no reason. Grains can be a really healthy part of a good diet.
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Old 09-06-2017, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Wilmington, NC
1,921 posts, read 340,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cleosmom View Post
I would trust the research I find on Dog Food Advisor over a vet's suggestion any day. Don't get me wrong, I have the utmost respect for my vet when it comes to medicine, but they get minimal education during school when it comes to small animal nutrition!! Most of their "education" is from companies that offer incentives.
The students at the vet school closest to me have a required semester-long course in nutrition, so I would disagree that they get minimal education. However, I have found that many vets are not open to or knowledgeable about nutritional plans that are outside of the standard Hills/Purina/Royal Canin prescription diets.
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Old 09-06-2017, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,007 posts, read 22,741,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
I prefer a home made diet for the most part too. What are you doing for a calcium supplement?

Btw, rice is a grain. I personally don't avoid grains for my dogs, rice and raw oats are part of their diets regularly here but I think a lot of people have a knee jerk reaction to grains for no reason. Grains can be a really healthy part of a good diet.
Yeah, the link I put above, says dogs can safely get 50% of their nutrition from carbs, and that they can do fine on a vegetarian diet.

I think the grain free fad is based on the low-carb human fad, which I also don't adhere to.

I don't worry about a calcium supplement. Just as for humans, if you eat what you were intended to eat, you will get what you need.

So, if a dog lived in the wild and ate grains and veggies, green leafy veggies include, and fruit and the occasional meat and bones - that should suffice to meet their needs.

So, I just don't worry about it. I do give a raw beef marrow bone about once a week, mainly to help clean her teeth. I'm betting this also gets her some needed animal fat and calcium.

But, I think the proof is in the pudding. Since I started feeding her "homemade food," she looks and feels better. She gets mainly cooked chicken, canned tuna, brown rice, lentils, rice, veggies (squash, tomatoes, spinach, carrots, peas - whatever I have), fruit (pears, plums, apples lately) the occasional raw beef marrow bone.

She's actually eating more volume of food, but looks slimmer and her coat looks more healthy.

I'm just kind of figuring, if she looks okay, that's good enough. Heck, none of us have grown up on the perfect diet. So, if I don't get it 100% right, but I don't do anything damaging, that should be good enough.

I do also keep up with her vaccinations, and she gets her heartworm/flea medication every month, as preventive measures.
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Old 09-06-2017, 07:13 PM
 
1,706 posts, read 1,209,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
I prefer a home made diet for the most part too. What are you doing for a calcium supplement?

Btw, rice is a grain. I personally don't avoid grains for my dogs, rice and raw oats are part of their diets regularly here but I think a lot of people have a knee jerk reaction to grains for no reason. Grains can be a really healthy part of a good diet.
I would argue that it depends on the grain. Oats are one of the "good" grains. Brown rice is another one that has some nutritional value. Corn or wheat- no way. I would rather feed oats or brown rice than white potatoes which are found in many grain-free foods now that are just empty starch with very little nutritional value.
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Old 09-06-2017, 07:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaMoon1 View Post
The students at the vet school closest to me have a required semester-long course in nutrition, so I would disagree that they get minimal education. However, I have found that many vets are not open to or knowledgeable about nutritional plans that are outside of the standard Hills/Purina/Royal Canin prescription diets.
I would take those classes with a grain of salt as many of them are sponsored or subsidized by the large pet food companies like Purina. As well, the so-called nutritional standards are formulated and regulated by a panel of experts comprised of members of the large pet food companies. So it is very circular with the people who make the pet food regulations essentially regulating themselves.
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Old 09-07-2017, 04:15 AM
 
Location: Wilmington, NC
1,921 posts, read 340,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twelvepaw View Post
I would take those classes with a grain of salt as many of them are sponsored or subsidized by the large pet food companies like Purina. As well, the so-called nutritional standards are formulated and regulated by a panel of experts comprised of members of the large pet food companies. So it is very circular with the people who make the pet food regulations essentially regulating themselves.
You may be right about nutritional standards, I don't know ... but academic courses in nutrition at colleges of veterinary medicine are taught by faculty members who are board-certified in nutrition and who must be unaffiliated (and must be careful about even the appearance of being affiliated) with pet food companies.
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Old 09-07-2017, 04:41 AM
 
16,568 posts, read 14,010,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twelvepaw View Post
I would argue that it depends on the grain. Oats are one of the "good" grains. Brown rice is another one that has some nutritional value. Corn or wheat- no way. I would rather feed oats or brown rice than white potatoes which are found in many grain-free foods now that are just empty starch with very little nutritional value.
Yes, this is really the most important thing. Thank you for sharing. But I think people tend to latch on to terms, like grain free, rather than incorporate quality grains into their dogs diets.
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Old 09-07-2017, 04:43 AM
 
16,568 posts, read 14,010,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaMoon1 View Post
The students at the vet school closest to me have a required semester-long course in nutrition, so I would disagree that they get minimal education. However, I have found that many vets are not open to or knowledgeable about nutritional plans that are outside of the standard Hills/Purina/Royal Canin prescription diets.
I would call a single semester a minimal education. Really, if we are talking about education, a semester is literally the minimum education you can get in a topc without having no education. I was required to take a single semester on economics, that does not by any stretch of the imagination make me an expert in the economics.
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Old 09-07-2017, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
4,706 posts, read 10,128,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
I would call a single semester a minimal education. Really, if we are talking about education, a semester is literally the minimum education you can get in a topc without having no education. I was ruequired to take a single semester on economics, that does not by any stretch of the imagination make me an expert in the economics.
I agree a semester of nutrition does not make anyone an expert on it.
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Old 09-09-2017, 01:36 AM
 
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Dogs Best Friend,
Retired Vet and Naturalist

Legion777 above is correct !
Dogs that are fed commercial canned & dry kibble( dead food )are the ones with twitches, torsion/bloat issues, cancer
and any other health and disease issues. ( owners wonder why their dog poos are soft & smell really bad )

A dogs gut can digest raw( live )food, including soft bone.
MILK BONE chews etc...(NO sliver like chicken bones that can PUNCTURE the intestine ).
Of course you will find the runs while your dog detoxes HOWEVER, you can then STOP squeezing
the anal glands, they will start working properly on there own as well as ALL other bodily functions !

THE PERFECT HOME MADE HEALTHY DOG FOOD.
Ground Beef - Protein, vitamins, minerals and flavor.
Turkey - Protein, low fat, vitamins, minerals and calming relaxer.
Shredded Cabbage - dietary fiber, carbs, vitamins, minerals and Anti-Cancer / Disease
Soft boiled(rid salmonella )eggs WITH ground shells - Protein, Calcium, iron, vitamins, minerals and carotids.
Cranberries dry / canned - dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, natural antibiotic.
ALL mixed in with your dogs favorites or on it's own, makes for a long, HEALTHY and HAPPY Best Friend.

​IF NEEDED, TEST for allergies eliminating each above INDIVIDUALLY.
Brush teeth with toothpaste to include, baking soda and hydrogen peroxide.

Last edited by Dogs Best Friend; 09-09-2017 at 02:12 AM..
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