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Old 09-07-2017, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,851 posts, read 21,937,543 times
Reputation: 10596

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rowan123 View Post
Thank you for rescuing him.

Most rescues, regardless of the breed, use the rule of three when a dog arrives at a new home.

3 DAYS. Put yourself in your new puppy or rescue cat’s shoes. Everything you have known has changed, and you are in a completely new environment that you haven’t quite learned yet. Those first 3 days can be incredibly overwhelming, and pets don’t always “act themselves” during this time frame. Adrenaline is generally boosted for the new pet during this time, making behavior more reactive and less predictable. Many are too stressed or shut down to show their “true colors” just yet. Some are manic, testing and pushing buttons to see what they can get away with. Long story short, the first 3 days could be very telling, or they could also go out with the bath water!

3 WEEKS. You’ve been out of the shelter/foster home for a whole 3 weeks now, and you’re starting to realize this new home is safe. You are bonding with your humans who have shown you nothing but love, and you’re beginning to trust them. You’re mastering the environment, and beginning to recognize patterns, such as when the humans leave and arrive home from work. Feel-good hormones like serotonin and dopamine begin to increase and combat the negative adrenaline and epinephrine surges. You may see behavioral changes.

3 MONTHS. This is the estimated time is takes for a new pet to fully settle down into a routine of a household. Trust and love has been built, and your new pet has an overall sense of security. Predictability is comforting, and it may take several months of repetition for your new pet to feel this way.
This is excellent information! I have a personality that really needs guidelines like this. I realize that none of this is cut and dried, inflexible information, but it helps to have something a little more concrete to go by when you're getting all kinds of advice.
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Old 09-08-2017, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
591 posts, read 264,936 times
Reputation: 2533
Quote:
Originally Posted by mic111 View Post
This information is for pit bulls and not your normal run of the mill house dog. Nothing I read in the OPs post regarding her dogs personality would warrant most of this type of treatment.
I don't agree that these recommendations are necessarily breed-specific, but YMMV. I am always in favor of doing whatever it takes to give these dogs every chance at success in their new homes.
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Old 09-04-2018, 10:22 AM
 
Location: north narrowlina
766 posts, read 274,518 times
Reputation: 3153
Golly OP, your experience is EXACTLY what i am going thru with my new rescue, i've had her for almost a month and she is just clueless what is expected outside.

i KNOW she was kept in a crate almost all the time, she could barely walk from muscle atrophy when i first got her.

she is so so so affectionate it breaks my heart that she is so loving and was treated so poorly for SIX YEARS!!!!

I can take her outside for half an hour and she won't go....bring her inside, 2 minutes later there is a puddle someplace.

Oddly enough, she HAS learned the word "outside???" that i ask every time at the door..... so much so that she will go to the door and has even started to jump up on it...i bring her out.... and nothing. sheesh

do you guys think those puppy pads work on a six year old dog? are they scented to attract them to pee there? I'm pretty old, so all the dogs I ever had couldn't use them because they hadn't been invented yet!!!! LOL
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Old 09-04-2018, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
30,863 posts, read 13,338,379 times
Reputation: 21963
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceiligrrl View Post
Golly OP, your experience is EXACTLY what i am going thru with my new rescue, i've had her for almost a month and she is just clueless what is expected outside.

i KNOW she was kept in a crate almost all the time, she could barely walk from muscle atrophy when i first got her.

she is so so so affectionate it breaks my heart that she is so loving and was treated so poorly for SIX YEARS!!!!

I can take her outside for half an hour and she won't go....bring her inside, 2 minutes later there is a puddle someplace.

Oddly enough, she HAS learned the word "outside???" that i ask every time at the door..... so much so that she will go to the door and has even started to jump up on it...i bring her out.... and nothing. sheesh

do you guys think those puppy pads work on a six year old dog? are they scented to attract them to pee there? I'm pretty old, so all the dogs I ever had couldn't use them because they hadn't been invented yet!!!! LOL
You need to find every spot in the house that she's peed on (or any other dog has urinated on) and find a way to completely get the odor out and that is not easy because urine can go right to the subfloor. When she smells her pee she thinks that is her toilet, it's exactly the same with people; we have learned that a white porcelain thing is where we go and we automatically head for one.

If you can't get rid of the pee odor then you need to keep her confined when she's in the house, a leash attached to your belt will work, or confine her in a kitchen or laundry room and take her out every 30 minutes until she establishes her 'outdoor' toilet - once she does that it's easy to just reinforce the habit of her going outside rather than in the house.
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Old 09-05-2018, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,851 posts, read 21,937,543 times
Reputation: 10596
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceiligrrl View Post
Golly OP, your experience is EXACTLY what i am going thru with my new rescue, i've had her for almost a month and she is just clueless what is expected outside.

i KNOW she was kept in a crate almost all the time, she could barely walk from muscle atrophy when i first got her.

she is so so so affectionate it breaks my heart that she is so loving and was treated so poorly for SIX YEARS!!!!

I can take her outside for half an hour and she won't go....bring her inside, 2 minutes later there is a puddle someplace.

Oddly enough, she HAS learned the word "outside???" that i ask every time at the door..... so much so that she will go to the door and has even started to jump up on it...i bring her out.... and nothing. sheesh

do you guys think those puppy pads work on a six year old dog? are they scented to attract them to pee there? I'm pretty old, so all the dogs I ever had couldn't use them because they hadn't been invented yet!!!! LOL
Well, I'll tell you what the animal behaviorist I hired (and that everyone laughed at me for) told me -- since it worked. She suggested that when we take our dog for a walk (through the neighborhood or to a park, wherever), that every time we saw him pee, we should say, "Good potty." If he hears that enough when he is outside, he should eventually start making the connection between doing it outside and seeing that it makes us happy. What we should not be doing is making him feel pressured to go when we take him out in the backyard for that express purpose. We may coax him out with treats at first, so that he comes to associate going out with a treat (this would obviously be tapered off and eventually discontinued at some point), but we wouldn't do anything to try to make him feel that he's supposed to do something back there. If and when he does (after no more than about 10 minutes), we can say "Good potty" and reward him with a treat. (We don't reward him with a treat on walks; we just say "Good potty" when he goes.) We were told to keep it really low key and not be too awfully exuberant when he does what he's supposed to do.

She also told us to take him out after meals and after naps, not to work by a set schedule, but to work by when he's actually most likely to need to go. We've been doing this for six weeks now and while we've had a couple of accidents, he went for 23 days between accidents (he blew it again on Sunday, but that's a whole other story), whereas he used to be marking in the house every 4 to 7 days on the average. By the way, he's about the age of your dog and I'm "pretty old" like you. I wish you well.
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Old 09-05-2018, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,658 posts, read 6,490,450 times
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^^I must have missed that post where people laughed at you for praising the dog when he peed. I've done it that way with all my dogs. They poop or pee, and I praise them. I never heard that's not the way you were supposed to do it. Same thing for not a set schedule - I could have sworn people said to take him out when he is most likely to need to go, like after meals and naps and then throughout the day.
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Old 09-05-2018, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,851 posts, read 21,937,543 times
Reputation: 10596
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
^^I must have missed that post where people laughed at you for praising the dog when he peed. I've done it that way with all my dogs. They poop or pee, and I praise them. I never heard that's not the way you were supposed to do it. Same thing for not a set schedule - I could have sworn people said to take him out when he is most likely to need to go, like after meals and naps and then throughout the day.
They were laughing at me when I brought on an animal behaviorist. I'd already tried all of the standard training methods. I'd read everything I could online and had talked to so many people on forums such as this one. All I got was the same ol', same ol'. When she visited with me and my husband and observed our dog for at least another hour, she picked up right away that I was probably being too exuberant in my praise and that my dog might be feeling pressure to perform on demand. I'm still supposed to praise him, but just tone it down some. And I'm not supposed to tell him what he's out there for.
It's supposed to be something he comes to realize after the praise, but not as a result of complying with a command. Evidently she was right because the improvement over the past 5 weeks has been dramatic. (All of this was discussed in an entirely different thread, which would explain why you didn't see it.)

I think you may have also misunderstood one thing I said, which was that I shouldn't be taking him out every 30 minutes or every 60 minutes or on any kind of a rigid time schedule. That, she felt, would merely make things worse. Instead, I should wait a little longer between each time I take him out (since he's not a puppy and could definitely hold it for much, much longer than just 30 or 60 minutes. I should take him out (1) after meals, (2) after a nap, and (3) after play. Then, when I do take him, he'll really need to go. I have found, though, that he generally doesn't need to go immediately after a meal. For him, it's more like an hour after he eats that he'll need to go. In other words, I should just take him out when it makes sense to, and not try to make his body work according to a time clock.
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Old 09-05-2018, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,658 posts, read 6,490,450 times
Reputation: 8115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
They were laughing at me when I brought on an animal behaviorist. I'd already tried all of the standard training methods. I'd read everything I could online and had talked to so many people on forums such as this one. All I got was the same ol', same ol'. When she visited with me and my husband and observed our dog for at least another hour, she picked up right away that I was probably being too exuberant in my praise and that my dog might be feeling pressure to perform on demand. I'm still supposed to praise him, but just tone it down some. And I'm not supposed to tell him what he's out there for.
It's supposed to be something he comes to realize after the praise, but not as a result of complying with a command. Evidently she was right because the improvement over the past 5 weeks has been dramatic. (All of this was discussed in an entirely different thread, which would explain why you didn't see it.)

I think you may have also misunderstood one thing I said, which was that I shouldn't be taking him out every 30 minutes or every 60 minutes or on any kind of a rigid time schedule. That, she felt, would merely make things worse. Instead, I should wait a little longer between each time I take him out (since he's not a puppy and could definitely hold it for much, much longer than just 30 or 60 minutes. I should take him out (1) after meals, (2) after a nap, and (3) after play. Then, when I do take him, he'll really need to go. I have found, though, that he generally doesn't need to go immediately after a meal. For him, it's more like an hour after he eats that he'll need to go. In other words, I should just take him out when it makes sense to, and not try to make his body work according to a time clock.
Okay. I don't have a time schedule in my head and each dog is a little different in the need to go after meals. My pup goes about 30 minutes after a meal and then once again in the next two hours. I'm more conscious of the timing because she is only 6 months. My older dog goes to the door and I don't pay particular attention to her unless she does that because she is older and there is never an accident.

Anyway, I'm glad you have it solved.

I never cheered like crazy when my pups pooped. I just said, "Good girl, good poop," and we continued with whatever we were doing.
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Old 09-10-2018, 03:48 PM
 
16,018 posts, read 19,512,122 times
Reputation: 26170
You dog is fearful of leaving your side because he has been dumped obviously. That is why he is so content laying next to you when you are inside doing something quietly.

Take him out after he eats....don't just stand there and expect him to go do his business like a dog that has been raised right....walk him to where you want him to go, slowly, playfully if he isn't acting like he has to go yet.....play with him, talk to him....give him a few minutes exercise.

He has only been with you a few days and you've started 3 threads? What made you go rescue him? In all fairness I haven't read your other threads, but is it really that bad already?

I think you should develop a lot more patience......he is like a new puppy....everything that you want him to do or know you will have to teach him....start with a routine......feed, water....outside sauntering around, in a relaxed unrushed way...so he can relax.

I would only be kenneling him if you have to leave the house and then only if you have no one home to be with him.

Personally, I wouldn't be leaving him alone, or even kenneled when you are home while he is still so stressy about you abandoning him.....it takes time and lots of love to undo his learned behaviors.

He obviously has the capacity to love you because he already does....your reward for your intense first few weeks will be his devotion and love. You can do this.
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Old 09-11-2018, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,851 posts, read 21,937,543 times
Reputation: 10596
This thread is a year old, Jan. You obviously didn't notice that.
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