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Old 09-10-2017, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,565,045 times
Reputation: 4907

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jencam View Post
Read this again and this is rather simple. Train your dog. Ignore them for a while except a friendly wave. Concentrate only on your dog. The first order of business is not making friends, it's him being non-reactive to other dogs no matter what they do.

As for jumping on people, you will need to engage the help of friends to train him not to that.
I have already started doing that, with friends and with my neighbors who are friendly to me and to him.

I think that the advice to ignore them is also great advice.
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Old 09-10-2017, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,565,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twelvepaw View Post
How do you know they have labeled him aggressive? Why are you engaging with these people? Your obligation is to your dog and keeping him safe.

Keep your dog leashed or in a fenced in yard, and your neighbors won't have a reason or the opportunity to yell at him. If you are out walking and see them coming, cross the street. Work on his behavior around other dogs= counter-condition with treats or tug or squeaky toy when you see them coming, cross the street, body block them so you are between your dog and their dogs, and keep moving.

You don't have to engage these people or their dog walker- just go about your business, and focus on keeping your dog engaged and happy working with you when you see them so that he is focusing on you and not on them.
Thanks, TwelvePaw.

I have behaved in a friendly manner with these people because they are my neighbors and because I want my dog to be friendly with them as well. When we are out walking, I work with his reactivity all of the time, and he has done really well.

However, I now realize that I am setting my dog up for failure by teaching him to be friendly to people and dogs who are unfriendly. Unfortunately, I didn't realize how they felt about my dog until these encounters happened. Otherwise, I would have definitely gone about things differently.

Now I know.
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Old 09-10-2017, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,565,045 times
Reputation: 4907
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Your large dog, off leash, in an unfenced yard, ran out of your yard onto public property and at a neighbor who was doing the correct thing by having her dog leashed. Sorry but you are 100% in the wrong here. Additionally you allow your dog off leash and then he jumps on people. Also 100% not ok. These other owners may be acting clique but your behavior as an owner has not been acceptable either.

You do not yet have control of your dog, he should not be allowed off leash until you do. Not in your unfenced yard, not around other dogs. That is not a statement about whether or not your dog is aggressive but is true for all dogs.

I also think it is beyond bizarre to move because of a dog park clique but I suspect your new neighbors would also appreciate you keeping your dog on leash, in your yard and not jumping on people.
I acknowledge that my dog shouldn't have run after her dog and I also acknowledge that he has an issue jumping on people. What I object to is the way that these situations are handled.

There is no reason to yell at my dog, especially b/c doing so is only going to escalate the tension in these situations and it also prevents me from disciplining and/or redirecting him.

There are many ways that these situations could have been handled in a friendly manner. For example, the woman who was walking could have simply asked me to leash my dog. Before we saw them, he was on-leash. I only let him off-leash b/c I viewed her and her dog as friendly and that is how he and her dog have interacted in the past.

As for the situation with him running after the other dog, again, I take responsibility for that. However, again, there is no reason to yell at my dog. And I expect an owner to take responsibility for their dog nipping at my dog. As far as I'm concerned, they didn't have complete control over their dog either nor did they reprimand their dog when he nipped at my dog. Yet I feel that my dog is being solely and unfairly blamed in these situations.
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Old 09-10-2017, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Kansas
19,187 posts, read 14,950,488 times
Reputation: 18248
I walk my larger dogs with a traffic lead, it is about 24" which really helps me control them. I have 2 dogs, had 1 alone for 7 years, it did her no harm not to have "dog" friends. Neither have any interest in making "dog" friends, but they both like people, more or less. I seemed to gather that you were thinking this dog might help you make friends with the neighbors, dogs generally do just the opposite which I think you are realizing.

I would also check to see if you are even allowed to have your dog off-lease before continuing that, and it doesn't matter what others do when a report gets made about your dog.

Some dogs just prefer people over other dogs. Some people prefer dogs over other people.
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Old 09-10-2017, 07:55 AM
 
Location: USA
16,862 posts, read 8,665,100 times
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My dog was very docile, and friendly, (sporting breed), but I ALWAYS kept him on a leash in public. Always.
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Old 09-10-2017, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,565,045 times
Reputation: 4907
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnywhereElse View Post
I walk my larger dogs with a traffic lead, it is about 24" which really helps me control them. I have 2 dogs, had 1 alone for 7 years, it did her no harm not to have "dog" friends. Neither have any interest in making "dog" friends, but they both like people, more or less. I seemed to gather that you were thinking this dog might help you make friends with the neighbors, dogs generally do just the opposite which I think you are realizing.

I would also check to see if you are even allowed to have your dog off-lease before continuing that, and it doesn't matter what others do when a report gets made about your dog.

Some dogs just prefer people over other dogs. Some people prefer dogs over other people.
No, I am not trying to use my dog to make friends with my neighbors; I'm just trying to be friendly towards them, especially those that have dogs, as I socialize my dog.
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Old 09-10-2017, 08:14 AM
 
9,568 posts, read 5,766,215 times
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I have a dog who can be unpredictable with other dogs and because of that he is always on a leash when we leave our property. Being approached by unleashed dogs is scary because I know that there will be nothing that I can do to keep the dogs apart if one of them suddenly becomes unfriendly.

In the scenario where your dog left your yard and ran up to the couple with the leashed dog, they had every right and reason to yell at your dog and the only reason why your dog was bit was because you had no control over him. You say that you accept responsibility for the incident but them blame the people with the leashed dog for reacting and for their leashed dog reacting to being charged by an unleashed dog.

Leash laws exist for good reason. Always use a leash and your problems with the neighbors will eventually come to an end once they see that you are being a responsible dog owner.
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Old 09-10-2017, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,565,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissTerri View Post
I have a dog who can be unpredictable with other dogs and because of that he is always on a leash when we leave our property. Being approached by unleashed dogs is scary because I know that there will be nothing that I can do to keep the dogs apart if one of them suddenly becomes unfriendly.

In the scenario where your dog left your yard and ran up to the couple with the leashed dog, they had every right and reason to yell at your dog and the only reason why your dog was bit was because you had no control over him. You say that you accept responsibility for the incident but them blame the people with the leashed dog for reacting and for their leashed dog reacting to being charged by an unleashed dog.

Leash laws exist for good reason. Always use a leash and your problems with the neighbors will eventually come to an end once they see that you are being a responsible dog owner.
No, the fight occurred b/c the leashed dog lunged at my dog. Your words point to the issue that I have with this situation: the other dog and his owners were being just as reactive as my dog. Yet my dog was the only dog reprimanded in this situation, and he was reprimanded in a very aggressive and hostile manner.

My dog wasn't charging when the leashed dog nipped at him. He ran towards the couple and dog as they were running by, then slowed down as he approached the other dog. As the dogs were being led out of the road by the couple, the leashed dog lunged at my dog. Had my dog been on a leash, this dog would have still lunged at him. I know this because another dog in this playgroup has snarled and lunged at my dog when both were on-leash.

I think that it is very dangerous to justify a dog nipping or lunging at another dog; there really is no excuse for it, and I have seen this sort of behavior from all of the dogs in this playgroup.

As I said, my dog has his issues, and I acknowledge those issues. But these other dogs have issues as well. All I ask is that this be acknowledged and that my dog not be solely blamed for these situations.
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Old 09-10-2017, 09:03 AM
 
9,568 posts, read 5,766,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
No, the fight occurred b/c the leashed dog lunged at my dog. Your words point to the issue that I have with this situation: the other dog and his owners were being just as reactive as my dog. Yet my dog was the only dog reprimanded in this situation, and he was reprimanded in a very aggressive and hostile manner.

My dog wasn't charging when the leashed dog nipped at him. He ran towards the couple and dog as they were running by, then slowed down as he approached the other dog. As the dogs were being led out of the road by the couple, the leashed dog lunged at my dog. Had my dog been on a leash, this dog would have still lunged at him. I know this because another dog in this playgroup has snarled and lunged at my dog when both were on-leash.

I think that it is very dangerous to justify a dog nipping or lunging at another dog; there really is no excuse for it, and I have seen this sort of behavior from all of the dogs in this playgroup.

As I said, my dog has his issues, and I acknowledge those issues. But these other dogs have issues as well. All I ask is that this be acknowledged and that my dog not be solely blamed for these situations.
Was there an actual dog fight? Would your dog have been nipped if your dog had been on a leash?

Regarding the other couple, it sounds like they know that they have a reactive dog who can be aggressive towards other dogs so when walking, they follow the law and keep him leashed. They are not anticipating that they are going to be approached by an off leash dog. This put them in a very scary situation. What do you think the couple could have done differently to have avoided their dog negatively reacting to your dog unexpectedly coming up to him?

If you have seen all of the dogs in this playgroup nip, snarl and lunge at other dogs while on leash then it's best to steer clear of all of these folks and just focus on yourself and your dog.
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Old 09-10-2017, 09:05 AM
 
16,568 posts, read 14,010,954 times
Reputation: 20518
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
I acknowledge that my dog shouldn't have run after her dog and I also acknowledge that he has an issue jumping on people. What I object to is the way that these situations are handled.

There is no reason to yell at my dog, especially b/c doing so is only going to escalate the tension in these situations and it also prevents me from disciplining and/or redirecting him.

There are many ways that these situations could have been handled in a friendly manner. For example, the woman who was walking could have simply asked me to leash my dog. Before we saw them, he was on-leash. I only let him off-leash b/c I viewed her and her dog as friendly and that is how he and her dog have interacted in the past.

As for the situation with him running after the other dog, again, I take responsibility for that. However, again, there is no reason to yell at my dog. And I expect an owner to take responsibility for their dog nipping at my dog. As far as I'm concerned, they didn't have complete control over their dog either nor did they reprimand their dog when he nipped at my dog. Yet I feel that my dog is being solely and unfairly blamed in these situations.
You don't get say you "acknowledge" that you were wrong and then take people to task for behaving in a way you think is wrong. Your actions and your actions alone caused these interactions.

If an 80lb dog came running at me and my leashed dog I would have reacted much more forcefully than your neighbor did. In all likelihood I would not only have physically prevented your dog from approaching mine I would have called the police. I would not yell at the dog I would have yelled at you. And why should they take responsibility for their dog "nipping" at an unleashed dog charging them? Their dog had the appropriate response. You did not. Let me be completely clear. Your dog is not the problem, you are.

The more you post the more I realize your neighbors have the right idea. For their sake I hope you do move.
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