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Old 10-25-2017, 12:45 PM
KB4 KB4 started this thread
 
Location: New York, New York
404 posts, read 1,125,391 times
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My dog has been having some digestion issues and I'm looking for advice on how to proceed. We adopted him in May and for 3 months he was fine on Wellness Core. Then he stayed at a kennel for 5 days where they fed the same food. He was fine there but 2 days after he came back home, the diarrhea started. We fed him chicken and rice and he was fine (which makes me think he does not have chicken allergy). He was checked by the vet, his stool test came back negative. So we figured he was probably stressed by the kennel stay. After a few days we started introducing Wellness again over the course of 3 days. Not sure if it was too fast but the diarrhea came back. The vet recommended Hill's prescription food. I'm not a big fan of Hill's but it fixed his stomach. We decided to try a different food (Orijen) which again we started slowly but by the next day he had diarrhea again. After that he's been on Hill's for a couple of weeks but I don't want to feed that long term. What would you do next? The vet thinks he should be fine on Wellness because he was fine on it for 3 months. Should we try it super slowly, starting by 10%? Or try a new, limited ingredient food? He also has dry skin (already at the shelter), not sure if it's because of a food intolerance or something else. The vet has no idea why. People have told me they had to try several different dog foods before they found one their dog could tolerate.
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Old 10-25-2017, 01:42 PM
 
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I would gradually shift from Hill's back to Wellness Core. as you said, 10% at a time. Do it over the course of a couple of weeks.

Even when I shifted my dog from one type of food to another within the same brand (and fundamentally the same ingredients) I did it gradually. Some dogs are just sensitive.
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Old 10-25-2017, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Southeast Idaho
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What kind of dog and how do you store your food?
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Old 10-25-2017, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
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What don't you like about Hills?
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Old 10-25-2017, 03:01 PM
 
919 posts, read 325,906 times
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A dogs intestines is designed to quickly break down raw meat & soft bone.
Add a raw turkey neck or raw chicken carcass to his diet & you'll see an improvement in his stools within days.

Turkey neck, chicken carcass & green tripe make up 95% of my dogs diet & he's only had sloppy stools twice in 12 months (which was a reaction to worming tablets)
My last boy ate the same & I can't remember him ever having a loose motion.

Check out the documentary Pet Fooled - Truth About Pet Food.
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Old 10-26-2017, 07:21 AM
KB4 KB4 started this thread
 
Location: New York, New York
404 posts, read 1,125,391 times
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Thank you for responding. It's even worse now as the dog had loose stools yesterday and at 2 am, while he was only eating the prescription food. Switched to chicken and rice for now. I'm wondering if it's possible that the stool test does not always show the parasites, maybe it should be repeated?

To answer some questions, the dog is a 4-year old shelter dog with unknown history, all mixed up, probably has some herding dog in it, 40 pounds and spaniel ears. The food is stored in the original bag, in the kitchen pantry (Hill's is canned, the others are kibble). About Hill's, I'm not sure if it provides the required nutritional value in the long term. Would like to try raw but I don't know if now is a good time to start while the dog has loose stools?
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Old 10-26-2017, 08:51 AM
 
1,706 posts, read 1,210,264 times
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Yes, you can switch your dog over to raw cold turkey (no pun intended).

However, please be aware that you have many options.

Please note that feeding a properly balanced raw diet is more complicated than just giving your dog chicken necks or carcasses.

If you decide to go with raw, please do some research on the different frozen options to see what will work best for you.
The main options are: prepared dehydrated meals e.g. Stella & Chewy's; prepared frozen raw meals e.g. Instinct, Stella & Chewy; prepared dehydrated base and you add the meat e.g. Sojo's; or a home-prepared raw diet that includes the right balance of muscle meat, organ meat, and bone.

Prepared frozen and freeze dried meals tend to be pricey. Sojo's base + your own added meat may be more cost effective.

If you decide to go with a home-prepared raw diet, please be sure you understand the nutrients needed and how to provide the correct balance of bone, muscle meat, and organ meat. Here is a link from Dogs Naturally that provides a high level overview:
How To Make Raw Dog Food

However, you also have other healthy options other than raw.
Honest Kitchen has dehydrated human grade meals that are equivalent to home-cooked meals. They can be pricey, but are way healthier than feeding kibble.

You can also consider doing your own home-cooked meals, but again, just like with raw, you need to be sure you are providing the correct balance of nutrients. There are also a couple of organizations that will provide you with a specialized home-cooking "recipe" that is tailored specifically for your dog's needs. There are also a couple of reputable sites that provide good general home-cooking recipes. See the links below:

Dr. Becker:
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites...made-diet.aspx

Pet Nutrition Consulting/Susan Lauten PhD:
pet nutrition services | petnutritionconsulting.com

Ohio State University:
Home-Made Diets | Veterinary Medical Center

Balance-It: run by certified veterinary nutritionists:
https://secure.balanceit.com

Pet Food Diva:
Pet Nutrition Consulting Services - Do You Offer Them? - Pet Food Diva
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Old 10-26-2017, 11:04 PM
 
Location: El paso,tx
2,000 posts, read 778,475 times
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Add a couple of heaping tablespoons of pure canned pumpkin to small meals. Feed half his food twice a day. Pumpkin firms things up. You might also give him a tablespoon of unflavored yogurt daily to help with beneficial bacteria in stomach.
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Old 10-29-2017, 04:03 PM
KB4 KB4 started this thread
 
Location: New York, New York
404 posts, read 1,125,391 times
Reputation: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by twelvepaw View Post
Yes, you can switch your dog over to raw cold turkey (no pun intended).

However, please be aware that you have many options.

Please note that feeding a properly balanced raw diet is more complicated than just giving your dog chicken necks or carcasses.

If you decide to go with raw, please do some research on the different frozen options to see what will work best for you.
The main options are: prepared dehydrated meals e.g. Stella & Chewy's; prepared frozen raw meals e.g. Instinct, Stella & Chewy; prepared dehydrated base and you add the meat e.g. Sojo's; or a home-prepared raw diet that includes the right balance of muscle meat, organ meat, and bone.

Prepared frozen and freeze dried meals tend to be pricey. Sojo's base + your own added meat may be more cost effective.

If you decide to go with a home-prepared raw diet, please be sure you understand the nutrients needed and how to provide the correct balance of bone, muscle meat, and organ meat. Here is a link from Dogs Naturally that provides a high level overview:
How To Make Raw Dog Food

However, you also have other healthy options other than raw.
Honest Kitchen has dehydrated human grade meals that are equivalent to home-cooked meals. They can be pricey, but are way healthier than feeding kibble.

You can also consider doing your own home-cooked meals, but again, just like with raw, you need to be sure you are providing the correct balance of nutrients. There are also a couple of organizations that will provide you with a specialized home-cooking "recipe" that is tailored specifically for your dog's needs. There are also a couple of reputable sites that provide good general home-cooking recipes. See the links below:

Dr. Becker:
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites...made-diet.aspx

Pet Nutrition Consulting/Susan Lauten PhD:
pet nutrition services | petnutritionconsulting.com

Ohio State University:
Home-Made Diets | Veterinary Medical Center

Balance-It: run by certified veterinary nutritionists:
https://secure.balanceit.com

Pet Food Diva:
Pet Nutrition Consulting Services - Do You Offer Them? - Pet Food Diva
Thank you very much for the interesting links. When we got the cat, we spent a lot of time reading about cat food. I now realize I need to put the same kind of effort into dog food.
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Old 10-30-2017, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,195 posts, read 6,078,465 times
Reputation: 11404
Quote:
Originally Posted by KB4 View Post
Thank you for responding. It's even worse now as the dog had loose stools yesterday and at 2 am, while he was only eating the prescription food. Switched to chicken and rice for now. I'm wondering if it's possible that the stool test does not always show the parasites, maybe it should be repeated?

To answer some questions, the dog is a 4-year old shelter dog with unknown history, all mixed up, probably has some herding dog in it, 40 pounds and spaniel ears. The food is stored in the original bag, in the kitchen pantry (Hill's is canned, the others are kibble). About Hill's, I'm not sure if it provides the required nutritional value in the long term. Would like to try raw but I don't know if now is a good time to start while the dog has loose stools?
OOhh I thought that you meant Hill's Science Diet (a kibble.)

In my experience wet food does cause loose stools, and runs through the dog faster. While we don't like it and try and diagnose it, it doesn't mean that anything is wrong or needs fixing (except we don't like getting up at 2 AM.)

My wife take my dog to work. She found out that another woman in the office has been spoon feeding him wet food. His stools were loose and I didn't know why.

I think that raw is too much of a PIA and expensive too. Dogs can usually do just fine on a Purina quality level food.
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