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Old 01-15-2011, 12:55 PM
 
8 posts, read 20,647 times
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Not good news. There's a large tumor in the entire left side of the nose and nasal sinuses, also some in the right nostril, as well as eroding bone. We get the radiology report back on Monday, so hopefully we learn more.
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Old 01-16-2011, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abs985 View Post
Not good news. There's a large tumor in the entire left side of the nose and nasal sinuses, also some in the right nostril, as well as eroding bone. We get the radiology report back on Monday, so hopefully we learn more.

So sorry to hear the news. When Dash had his CT his had not eroded any bone and was only in the left sinuse and had spread no where else which is why I did decide to do the palliative IMRT with him. I hope your dog is getting some good pain meds as cancer eating into a bone has to be painful.

I think when you deal with cancer it is important you learn to never let go of hope. I think in earlier posts alot of us got angry at Woof woof woof as what she was doing was trying to steal that hope from everyone and that is so wrong to do to anyone: However, during the journey hopefully one learns that while it is important to hold on to hope , that it is also important to allow that hope to change. It goes from I hope my dog does not have cancer to I hope I can cure my dog, to I hope I can get alot of quality time with my dog and finally to I hope my dog has a painfree death. Even I hope I can survive my dogs death and move beyond it can be a part if that hope.

My friends that rescue Homozygous merle aussies use this definition of Hope.

Hope sees the invisible. feels the intangible amd achieves the impossible._ anonymous. All through the cancer battles with my mom and my dogs I kept a copy of that posted on my computer ( it is still there) so I read it often but it also made me come to the above conclusion that what we hope for changes as the disease does and that is OK because it is still hope.

I hope you are treasuring each day with your dog and making each one special for the dog.My Mcdonald's meal with Dash and his car ride to say goodbye to his favorite spots and Jazz's last visit to her favorite place the beach have helped me so much as I have always felt it I was told I had terminal cancer I would make a " last things list" and do it if possible so doing that with the dogs brought me some sense of peace. Give that pup lots of love! and once again sorry to hear the news and I know that is not what any of us wants to hear when we have a CT done.
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Old 01-16-2011, 06:14 PM
 
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Radiology reports came back last night. I'll just copy/paste a tiny part of the email our vet sent last night.


"To summarize the medical jargon for you, the tumor goes from the front to the very back of his nose. It has eroded through bone on the sides of the nose, the bottom (top of his mouth), and the bone that separates the nose from the brain"


So basically, the tumor is now next to the brain. Unfortunately, we don't know how fast this tumor is growing. He's really not doing great now, and we don't want to risk him having to suffer a seizure, facial deformity, etc. My family decided we'd rather put him down a little early, rather than a day too late. Cody has an appointment tomorrow at 3pm to be euthanized.
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Old 01-18-2011, 02:33 AM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
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abs985

I know it must have been a rough day for you and your family but I do hope that knowing you prevented Cody from suffering can bring all of you some comfort. Trust me it was not too early. When the first dog I owed as an adult developed Lymphoma in her old age on top of heart troubles my vet said while he felt she did not have to be put to sleep that day or the next he wanted me to know that from that day forward there really would be no wrong time to do it and that when I felt it was the right time it would be the right time. When the day came to make the decision his words were right there guiding me.

I hope someday a new dog will enter you life and help fill the void that I know Cody has left. While yes it is hard to say goodbye the pain we suffer is so worth all the love we share with our dogs. For now you and your family have my sympathies.
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Old 01-18-2011, 11:16 AM
 
15 posts, read 51,892 times
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Exclamation Dashdog

I cannot believe you are still posting...
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Old 01-24-2011, 12:52 PM
 
Location: West Hollywood, CA
4 posts, read 22,708 times
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Default Considering Cyberknife radiation

Hi everyone,

I have been reading the threads here for the past week. It has been so incredibly helpful. Thank you to everyone on here for sharing. Especially a big hug and thank you to Dashdog for starting this thread. I can not imagine how many people and their special furry friends you have helped through your efforts and care. You are an amazing woman.

My dog was recently diagnosed with nasal carcinoma. As you all know from experience, I am beside myself with grief. I have been to see Dr Lyons in Culver City and Dr Ayls in Ventura. I have also met with Dr Lane to discuss neoplasene. Now I am looking into the cyberknife treatment at Colorado State University. My dog's name is Snoopy. He is an 11 year old Bearded Collie. The cancer is at the inner tip of his nose. I am treating him with herbs, urine therapy, high protein diet and acupuncture while conducting this research. I have to act soon with radiation so I am trying to narrow it down as quickly as possible. Any additional insight would be most appreciated.

Hugs to all on here.
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Old 01-24-2011, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
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Sorry to hear your dog has nasal cancer. I have alot of respect for Dr Ayl and am thankful he was able to use IMRT on Dash. While I only did palliative and it did not save his life it did buy him many great months of good quality life. Having also used the neoplasene I do not think I would use it on nasal cancer again, mast cell tumors or tumors outside the body where there is no chance a dead chunk of tumor could get trapped yes but inside the nose especially in the sinus like Dash no. Knowing what I know now I would talk to Colorado State University as I have heard very good things about that oncologist and I know humans with early stage lung cancer that had it treated with Cyberknife at Stanford and remain cancer free without any chemo. I would learn as much about the treatments they now offer and base my decision on what I can afford to do, what my pet would tolerate and what my ultimate goal is. Having had experience with cancer and being told at that time that it really could not be cured I opted for palliative IMRT as my goal was to give Dash some more time but try to make it a high quality time and at that time I am not sure any one was even offering cyberknife for dogs as IMRT was even rare. Good luck in what ever you decide and let us know how your dog is doing. I try to keep this going so people can learn of new tretaments in hopes that one day someone will beat this horrible cancer. That would be a victory even for all of us who have lost a dog.
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Old 01-24-2011, 06:18 PM
 
Location: West Hollywood, CA
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Default Snoopy's treatment

Thank you for your quick response, Dashdog. I have Snoopy scheduled for a CT scan tomorrow with Dr Ayl (pending clearing of a stomach upset). Based on the results of that, I will know what sort of treatment he is a candidate for. He had a lot of nosebleeds through December, after his initial exam. Then he bled for 3 days post rhinoscopy. He has not bled really in 10 days. The tumor is visible in his right nostril but he does not seem to be distressed. So far he is breathing normally with an occasional bit of sniffling. He had some sneezing fits through to 10 days ago and it has also stopped completely. If I couldn't see the tumor I would think nothing was wrong with him. If he isn't suffering, should I consider palliative treatment or should I wait until he does? I am just scared about the stats of "untreated" vs "treated". Will Palliative radiation serve to buy more time, despite the absence of distress just by shrinking the tumor? Why is it the more I learn, the less I feel I know? I spoke with Dr LeRue at CSU today and the SRS sounds good buy Dr Ayl said it will cause more damage to the healthy tissue than IMRT. Now I am really confused...
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Old 01-26-2011, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
4,922 posts, read 11,219,171 times
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I will try to post more of a reply tomorrow as right now I am in the middle of my 3 nights at work and working 12 hr shifts that leaves little time for anything but sleep. exercising the dogs and returning to work.I just wanted you to know that I have read your last post and will get back to you as to why I choose Palliative verses definitive IMRT.
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Old 01-27-2011, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
4,922 posts, read 11,219,171 times
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With Dash I could have afforded to do definitive IMRT but that involved 15-20 days ( if I remember right) and the palliative was only 5. Dash did not like going to vets and I knew asking him to do 15-20 days would be expecting too much from him and also worried about him going under anesthesia that often so I figured the 5 days he could handle but even then by the last day he did not want to go with the tech when they came out to get him and I had to walk with him as far as they would allow me too I knew that night that I had made the right choice doing just the palliative.

I would think that zapping it when it is in the early stages might knock it back for quite awile and maybe even stop it from spreading for a longer period. But I am not 100% sure of that but it would be something to ask them.

As for the cyberknife causing more tissue damage I am surprised by that as when I researched it for my mom's lung cancer Dr. Chang up at Stanford said there was very little damage to healthy tissue as with humans they implant a small gold chip and the radiation beams all target it and they are coming from all directions. He said it would only take one or two doses too. I would have asked Dr. LeRue which would cause less damage with the best results and gotten her opinion on it too since she does do the cyberknife. I have met humans that had it and said they did not get radiation burns and it only took the 1 or 2 sessions But then again Dash really did not have radiation burns and the only damage was he did have mild dry eye. if I did not tell someone he had palliative IMRT they never even knew something was wrong until he did develope the swelling much later. That is why I got so mad on here when a few people said " how can you do that to your dog?" or "your just doing that for you not your dog". Do what? make him more comfortable and able to breath easier in his sleep? give him a longer life with good quality time. how could I not do that for him? People that have bad experiences with cancer treatments be it themselves,a loved one or a pet seem to think that all experiences are bad..not so. Every living thing is an individual unlike the next being and they have different experiences with things. With pets you also have the option if things do not go well not only can you stop treatment but you can end the suffering and put them down.

I have said many times when making a decision consider , can I afford it both cost and time invloved?will my pet really benefit from it? Will my pet tolerate it? You really have to put the pets temperment in the equation which is why with Jazz and her zygomatic gland tumor I put her down rather then try surgery. She hated vets with a passion, hated being away from me ( the curse of being a cattle dog mix as they bond so strongly to one person) so I could not put her through treatments which would have started with surgery and several days at the hospital and lots of vet visits as she would have hated every moment of that. Dash on the other hand was more agreeable to things and his did not require he be away from me except for the hour or two they had him in prep, treatment and recovery and while he disliked vets he did not get aggessive and would even crawl out from under his chair and give Dr. Ayl a lick as if to say It is not you but rather what you do that I do not like. (Jazz on the other hand would have required a muzzle as she would have been snapping at the Dr. Ayl to keep him away)

It was very hard to not do something for Jazz as her cancer was contained up behind the eye had not gotten into bone so they may have been able to stop it with surgery and follow up treatment of chemo or radiation but even so it would have been too high a price for her so I do not regret my decision with either dog. I look at it as Ok so I buy you 6 more months well if a large amount of that is dealing with something they hate ( vets!) why do it as it is better to enjoy what time you do have left even if it means less time then getting a few good days and the rest being horrible days all for an extra month or two. It is sort of the Survive verses thrive situation and if I was a patient with a terminal illness I would not want survive I would want thrive. If I am merely alive but not able to enjoy life what is the point?
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