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Old 08-05-2008, 11:00 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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I've heard small dogs live longer than large ones. Anyone know why?

I realize there will be a lot of variation. What is average for any size dog?

How long have yours lived?
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Old 08-06-2008, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
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Big dogs put more strain on their hearts and lungs. Great Danes 6-8 yrs.
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Old 08-06-2008, 04:00 AM
 
Location: Southport, NC
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Many small breeds have lifespans upwards of 14-15 years. Others, such as Bernese Mountain Dogs are around 6-8 (this has decreased in recent years and they are subject to cancers). Larger breeds have the shorter lifespans due to the overall physical stress on their bodies.
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Old 08-06-2008, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Ohio
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I have a medium size chow mix. She is almost 14 years old but she is not in the best of health. I also have a Lab mix. She is only 2 yrs old so hopefully she will be around for years to come.
Most of my dogs have lived between 10 and 14 years. Large one's don't seem to live as long as smaller dogs.
One thing I found out a fews years ago. I had an Irish Setter and fed her twice a day. She ate pretty good size meals. One day right after she ate she was in the yard romping around and a couple hours later is was obvious something was definitely bad wrong. I took her to an emergency vet and found out her stomach had twisted and therefore sealed off her esophugas (Sp) and her intestines. Gas and pressure was building up in the stomach and there was no way for it to escape. She was in misery and the vet said at that point there was nothing he could do except put her down. She was only 5 yrs old. He said this happens to large deep chested dogs sometimes if they get real active right after eating a large meal.
From that day on whenever I feed a larger dog I keep them in the house for awhile before I let them out to play. There is a medical term for that condition but I don't remember what it was. I loved that dog. I didn't have any idea that something like that could ever happen to her. I had never heard of it before.
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Old 08-06-2008, 05:35 AM
 
Location: The Great State of Arkansas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robhu View Post
I took her to an emergency vet and found out her stomach had twisted and therefore sealed off her esophugas (Sp) and her intestines. Gas and pressure was building up in the stomach and there was no way for it to escape. She was in misery and the vet said at that point there was nothing he could do except put her down. She was only 5 yrs old. He said this happens to large deep chested dogs sometimes if they get real active right after eating a large meal.
From that day on whenever I feed a larger dog I keep them in the house for awhile before I let them out to play. There is a medical term for that condition but I don't remember what it was.
It's bloat, or gastric torsion, and is more common than we realize. It's always a good idea to keep an eye on your dogs for a while after they eat. It can be fatal very quickly and is considered a true veterinary emergency. It isn't always based on the activity level. A relative lost a senior to this about 6 hours after her meal and trust me, that dog was the biggest couch potato you've ever seen! Gastric torsion can be relieved in the earlier stages by inserting a tube into the stomach and allowing the gas to escape. Sometimes the stomach will twist back into the original position...but you are correct, in the latter stages it is almost always fatal. Early detection is key, but sometimes it just doesn't matter how early. This occurs a lot in dogs that eat really fast, too...so slow those meals down if you can.

To the OP - I've had a Rottweiler make it just past 16 and a Yorkie to 17, so with proper care and nutrition dogs can live to a ripe old age, but so much depends on genetics. Personally, it seems to me the good old DAWGS live the longest...I guess they just have a lot of traits that get watered down in their long heritage! Before getting a pet, it's always good to look at the dominant breed (if you can figure out what it is!) and do some research on life expectancy.
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Old 08-06-2008, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
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Ditto what everyone else has already said. My mixed (think she may have been lhasa/cocker/and maybe some poodle?) lived to be 13 (small-med size) and my Saint only lived to be 6 before she passed away from bone cancer. The average life span for a Saint, though, is usually 7-10. I think mixed breeds and smaller dogs tend to live longer. I also think that genetics and nutrition play a huge role in longevity along with physical activity.
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Old 08-06-2008, 06:31 AM
 
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My GSDs have lived anywhere from 11-15 years. Typical for the breed is 10-12, but I tend toward dogs on the small end of the size standard. Males in the 70lb range females in the 50 lb range.

My ESS lived to be 14 she was 40 lbs, but had CHF.

On bloat - we feed two meals a day and cut excercise to 1 hour before and 2 hours after eating [heavy excercise]. Go into a breed knowing the genetic diseaese they are predisposed to.
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Old 08-06-2008, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Ava, Mo
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I have a mutt: part chow/Australian shepherd & boxer, he will be 15 yrs old in January. He is getting deaf (or just has selective hearing) and at times I don't think he sees very well. As a puppy he was given a shot which he had a reaction to and it began eating away at the skin on his side. When asked what to do about it, the vet's reply was, "Get a new dog." He was my husband's dog and he nursed him back to health and is a great dog.
I also have a 7 yr old pug. The life expectancy of a pug can be up to 18 years.
Every breed has a certain life expectancy as long as they are kept active and taken care of properly.
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Old 08-06-2008, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Living on 10 acres in Oklahoma
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Gosh, I wish I could remember the company of the poster that our vet has in his clinic. It states that dogs that are kept at a healthy weight, are mixed breeds and are altered live longer. I've read on CD several people who have had larger dogs that have lived past 11y/o. I truly believe it's all about good health care, proper weight management and having a good 'ole mix breed dog. So many of the pure breeds are having serious genetic issues that are being bred into each litter leading to shorter life spans. I'm not a proponent of breeders (as many people already know), but I would make sure that the breeder is serious enough about their breed to run the genetic test for health abnormalities.
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Old 08-06-2008, 07:58 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
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I have a white Boxer who is 11
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