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Old 12-27-2008, 03:05 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,508 posts, read 5,476,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrs1885 View Post
I wish you weren't set on a puppy. I found a stunning mastiff / rottweiler in NY that is in a foster home. I'm in love with this dog and if I could get out of hubby's site long enough to make a round trip TN / NY I'd grab him in a heart beat. He's 3 years old, so still young and weighs 200 pounds. He's a huge teddy bear they say. His name is Tyson. If you're willing to consider a dog that won't pee on your carpet and already has flawless house manners, DM me. I'll be happy to go pull the info I have (I want him so bad I printed out his flyer and keep it in my office just in case I get a wild hair one day!!) and send it to you. And if you get him and decide he's too old you can always send him to me!!

BTW - those of you with the fawn / black mask English Mastiffs are killing me! That's what my Cleo was. 182 pounds of love bug. I adored her, but lost her at 8 years old from inoperable hip dysplasia. The EMs really are phenomenal dogs, but again, you've got to socialize them very early on and do lots of training. Had Cleo not been so good at minding me, she'd have killed me. I weighed more than 60 pounds less than she did. Her head was double the size of mine!
Thanks for your post.
That's exactly why we want a puppy. I want to be the one who raises him/her- the right way. I have a great network of supportive friends w/dogs & kids.
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Old 01-02-2009, 10:29 AM
 
Location: PA
13 posts, read 26,254 times
Reputation: 15
You couldn't go wrong with a Cane Corso. I've adopted Zeus from a shelter. I struck out extremely lucky with him and i can say he feels the same way with all the love and spoiling he gets here. He is extremely well behaved and gental. I could tell that his previous owner did take him to training and had socialized with other dogs which is a BIG plus for me. I'm 5'7" and weight 110lbs. So it's odd to see a dog like him (weighing in at a healthy 130lbs) and me walking down the street. I've done alot of research on many breeds before i came to the conclusion of a Cane Corso. I did find out at his begining manners class that he has an issue with rotweilers. He's so so with black dogs, but apparently he had a bad experience with a rotweiler. Taking in consideration the size of both of us i was easily able to control the situation. Zeus and this breed is one of a kind. I will never go to another breed. As far as space...they make great apartment dogs...i guess because they are a little on the lazy side. HaHa. Fortunetly i own 5 acres in the country so he has lots of room to run. Good luck with your search

Cane Corso Mom
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Old 01-02-2009, 10:44 AM
 
2,064 posts, read 6,019,152 times
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How do big dog owners control their dog? I understand that training is key, but I have always felt that if you couldn't physically control your dog, you shouldn't own it. Situations arise that require physical restraint... an off leash dog attacks your dog, your dog's inner prey drive kicks in and he goes after a cat, your dog wants to attack a stranger that isn't really a stranger... I don't know, it just seems that no matter how well trained, that at some point in the 10+ year lifespan of a dog, you will be required to physically restrain it. I am 6'3", 220lbs and in shape. I wouldn't own a 200lb dog because I don't even think I could hold it back if I had to. I'm not critizing, I'm curious.
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Old 01-02-2009, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Mountains of middle TN
5,244 posts, read 14,031,515 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewHomeHappy View Post
Thanks for your post.
That's exactly why we want a puppy. I want to be the one who raises him/her- the right way. I have a great network of supportive friends w/dogs & kids.
Not every dog from a rescue or shelter has temperment or behavior problems. I've rescued plenty and adopted out plenty. As a matter of fact it's been over 10 years since I've brought home a puppy. The best dog I ever owned was a rottweiler that I adopted when he was 6 years old. Don't discount them and think they aren't well behaved just because you didn't raise them. I'm not saying you should get an adult, I'm just saying please don't judge all shelter / rescue dogs based on what you've seen of some. Most are actually wonderfully behaved, and in most cases you get to skip the ugly puppy stuff like housebreaking and eating the couch by adopting an older dog.

Quote:
How do big dog owners control their dog? I understand that training is key, but I have always felt that if you couldn't physically control your dog, you shouldn't own it. Situations arise that require physical restraint... an off leash dog attacks your dog, your dog's inner prey drive kicks in and he goes after a cat, your dog wants to attack a stranger that isn't really a stranger... I don't know, it just seems that no matter how well trained, that at some point in the 10+ year lifespan of a dog, you will be required to physically restrain it. I am 6'3", 220lbs and in shape. I wouldn't own a 200lb dog because I don't even think I could hold it back if I had to. I'm not critizing, I'm curious.
I'm 5'5" and weighed all of 118 pounds soaking wet when I had my mastiff who was 182 pounds. I never had a single problem controlling her, ever. And yes, it was training. Constant training. If you aren't willing to commit to that, I agree, you shouldn't have a larger stronger breed of dog.

Dogs by nature belong in packs. In a pack there is a leader and they follow the rules of that leader. As long as you are constantly training them, you are constantly establishing yourself as their leader.
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Old 01-03-2009, 04:43 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,931,363 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrs1885 View Post
And yes, it was training. Constant training. If you aren't willing to commit to that, I agree, you shouldn't have a larger stronger breed of dog.

Dogs by nature belong in packs. In a pack there is a leader and they follow the rules of that leader. As long as you are constantly training them, you are constantly establishing yourself as their leader.
Yes, training.
And while I won't comment on other large breeds, one thing I know for sure is that a well-bred English Mastiff *wants* to please his or her owner.
They go through a definite adolescence; they may test boundaries while still under one year. However, ultimately, they are truly devoted to their pack leader and respond well to obedience training.
I am nowhere near 6'3" let alone 200 pounds but managed to civilize all three of our various mastiffs we've had over the years.
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Old 01-03-2009, 06:02 PM
 
181 posts, read 565,338 times
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I have just rescued a 10 mth bullmastiff female and 88lbs - I couldn't be happier. Its like living with a person, I am sure she has a mega brain in that big skull of hers!!
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Old 01-03-2009, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Some place very cold
5,500 posts, read 20,074,778 times
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Big dogs take up too much room on the bed (you need to get a California king mattress) and they don't live as long.

You can always get a horse!
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Old 01-03-2009, 08:17 PM
 
10,604 posts, read 14,214,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by babyb View Post
You couldn't go wrong with a Cane Corso.

Cane Corso Mom
I believe most people WILL "go wrong" with a Cane Corso. Not only does the average person have no idea how to communicate with a dog but a powerful breed especially a Cane Corso is ridiculous for most people imo. Even the name translates to guardian.

Watch Cesar Milan and explain if these people can't even live in harmony with Bishons, Labs and Basset Hounds how they're gonna make out with a Cane Corso. Oh and not to forget the lack of interest people have in even providing the dog with a walk.

Our local police chief even had a Cane Corso... supposedly "trained". Not only did the dog bite HIM but it couldn't be walked in town because he was always on guard because the idiot cop didn't even notice it. He deserved the bite, actually, he was not following the rules the dog was trying to set up...absent any leadership from the two legged roomate. LMAO
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Old 01-03-2009, 08:24 PM
 
3,724 posts, read 8,286,097 times
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I've had somewhere over 60 dogs in my adult life, mostly large to the giant economy sized dogs, with some exceptions - those being Siberians, which aren't very big but definitely have an attitude about what they want to do! Some of the bigger ones were Mals, Lab crosses, Borzoi, Irish wolfhound, and they do mostly have shorter life spans than the smaller breeds. The IW did live to be 15 before I finally had to have him put to sleep because he was failing. The longest-lived one I had was a mini poodle that lived nearly 23 years before dying in her sleep, after a series of small strokes. All but a couple were rescues, other people's dumps and throw-aways. But that's another story.

The thing about big dogs is that you do need to train, train, train. Nearly all of my rescues had never learned anything, not even their names [some of them I knew before I got them] so it was, at times, interesting to say the least. One of the Borzoi I actually bought from a breeder, and she sent the one she wanted, not the one I was supposed to get. He turned out to be a fear-biter with a very poor conformation, and rather than send him back - we had no faith in her after that - we did manage to keep him under control for 9 years, until some kind person let him out of his pen to 'see him run' and he snagged a jogger. So with him, it was either put him down or go to court. The other two Borzoi and the IW were total mushes, and were strictly house dogs.

The oldest one I have now is a lab/newfie with just enough husky to have that 'gotta run' gene, and an extremely high prey drive. She loves other dogs, but cats, rabbits, and squirrels are meals on wheels, as far as she's concerned. Another one I have now is a golden/GSD who was obedience trained, but even so, I work with her constantly. The third one is a beagle, he's the second smallest I've had, and dumb as a brick but incredibly sweet.

Whatever you get, be absolutely sure you have the time and patience to work, work, work with whatever dog you get. And quadruple that if it's a puppy - puppies are too cute for words, but there's so much they need to learn, and they need to learn most of it before they learn they have a choice about whether to obey or not. Then there's the adolescence - the teenagers of dogdom are in a class of their own. You could swear they were totally brainless, then all of a sudden one day they turn out to actually be great dogs. IF you are patient and keep working with them.
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Old 01-03-2009, 08:26 PM
 
10,604 posts, read 14,214,683 times
Reputation: 17203
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewHomeHappy;4928872

[QUOTE
I really want a big dog. English Mastif/Cane Corso/Saint Bernard/Weimeriener Great Dane, etc a mix.
...
The only thing these dogs have in common is being big. They are all different in temperament and needs. You really need to research and find out what type of dog suits YOUR ENERGY. That's what the dog is looking for. Not your height or weight.

A Cane Corso is a very bad idea as are most of these on your list, imho for an inexperienced dog person.

And getting a puppy is not any measure of the future. Adopting a rescue dog that is older you know EXACTLY what you're getting. (depending on your impact after taking it home which might change the entire dog immediately because of you)

I suggest you have a Cesar Milan marathon (he's on every day and in video even netflix) and you'll be able to define a better match and if in fact you actually want a dog and why. Just last night there was a Dane that the TWO owners didnt have a clue what to do with and it was 2 years old way out of control. They had it from a PUPPY.
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