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Old 01-04-2009, 03:34 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,843,346 times
Reputation: 13244

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Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post



The only thing these dogs have in common is being big. They are all different in temperament and needs. You really need to research and find out what type of dog suits YOUR ENERGY.
True.
The best info I've found for this is The Right Dog For You, by Daniel Tortora.
It goes into depth with the breed's description and characteristics. The book probably needs to be updated (it's about ten years old) but is a great starting point.
Quote:
A Cane Corso is a very bad idea as are most of these on your list, imho for an inexperienced dog person.
True.
Quote:
And getting a puppy is not any measure of the future. Adopting a rescue dog that is older you know EXACTLY what you're getting. (depending on your impact after taking it home which might change the entire dog immediately because of you)
The thing is, finding the *right* rescue isn't always workable.
What if the rescues out there are bad with kids, or don't like cats, or have some other unknown problem that did not manifest itself in the foster home?
I suppose there is no perfect pet-finding formula; it's sad to see an already short-lived dog without a forever home.
Karibear, I've heard that Borzois are like Afghans in that once they get a scent, unless restrained--they're outta there.
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Old 01-04-2009, 08:41 AM
 
3,714 posts, read 8,266,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWillowPlate View Post
True.
The best info I've found for this is The Right Dog For You, by Daniel Tortora.
It goes into depth with the breed's description and characteristics. The book probably needs to be updated (it's about ten years old) but is a great starting point.

True.

The thing is, finding the *right* rescue isn't always workable.
What if the rescues out there are bad with kids, or don't like cats, or have some other unknown problem that did not manifest itself in the foster home?
I suppose there is no perfect pet-finding formula; it's sad to see an already short-lived dog without a forever home.
Karibear, I've heard that Borzois are like Afghans in that once they get a scent, unless restrained--they're outta there.
No, the Borzoi and Afghans [I had a couple of those, too] are sight hounds, not scent hounds. It's the beagles, bloodhounds, blue tick, and so on that follow their noses. The sight hounds can't really be trusted with cats, for instance, unless they've grown up with them, they'll chase anything that runs. One of my Borzoi was obedience trained before I got her, one we got so young he never learned to not come when he was called. The third one, as I mentioned previously, was a screwed up fear-biter and was never allowed to run loose but kept penned. One problem I've heard mentioned a lot with sight hounds is how to keep them penned up - a fence has to be highly visible, plain wire just won't do it. There has to be something that makes it obvious that it's there, or a dog seeing something on the other side may start running after it and crash into the fence.

One of the dogs I have now is a beagle and he'll follow his nose instead of looking where he's going. I have a big back yard that's fenced and I also have a horse in it. I've seen him more than a few times snurf his way along and run right into her hoof, and he always looks so surpised, like 'Where did YOU come from?' Fortunately she's very tolerant and just nugdes him aside. But there's absolutely no way to trust him outside the fence off leash, he'd run in front of a car, a train, whatever, and never know what hit him.
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Old 01-10-2009, 10:19 AM
 
Location: ROTTWEILER & LAB LAND (HEAVEN)
2,406 posts, read 5,345,804 times
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Default Only rotts for us

My whole life I had large dogs. My Father wouldn't think of having anything under 80 pounds.
I guess that's why I LOVE BIG DOGS . I love all dogs, but my #1 favorite is Rottweilers.
They get a bad rap...but to date were on number 10 in the Rotty department.
We use to buy from breeders, but once we realized there was a rescue group for every breed, we started to rescue. Every Rotty we have rescued has been a WONDERFUL dog.
They are smart, want to please, and not hiper. They are content to do whatever it is your doing. I feel protected.
My favorite time was when we had 4 Rottweilers at a once.
If we had the money & a bigger house, we would of had more. We have plenty of running room. They have over 12 acres to run on & is fenced .
They live in the house with us. They are our kids
Now we have 3 Rotts, all rescues. They are beautiful.
Do to my health reasons (amputee) I can't do as much as I use to, but the Rotts don't care, they just want to be with their Mom.
When Daddy comes home, they are really happy.
They are happiest when were all home together.

My Great Nieces/Nephews come over & they adore the kids.

Rottweilers are the only breed for us.

I think if someone is looking for a new "BIG DOG" they need to do their research. Go to different breeders, just to check out that specifc breed/type. Check out rescue organizations, there are so many out there.
REMEMBER..the bigger the dog, the more expensive. More food...larger heartworm pills, larger flea/tick prevention, larger doses of meds, if they need them. A bigger area for the dog to live & strive. Longer walks, etc...
Just be sure that specific breed is what you are looking for.

Rescued dogs really do appreciate their new life.
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Old 01-10-2009, 01:04 PM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,843,346 times
Reputation: 13244
Quote:
Originally Posted by karibear View Post
No, the Borzoi and Afghans [I had a couple of those, too] are sight hounds, not scent hounds. It's the beagles, bloodhounds, blue tick, and so on that follow their noses.
Ah yes, my mistake.
When I was a kid, we had a beagle named Huckleberry that lived across the street from us. I would be shopping with my mom all the way on the other side of town, and who would we meet but old Huckleberry, following his nose.
And I once was arriving at a park when I saw a young woman's Afghan see something and take off towards a busy street.
Those Borzois are very majestic-looking, but they look like a lot of responsibility!
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Old 01-10-2009, 07:04 PM
 
3,714 posts, read 8,266,269 times
Reputation: 1402
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWillowPlate View Post
Ah yes, my mistake.
When I was a kid, we had a beagle named Huckleberry that lived across the street from us. I would be shopping with my mom all the way on the other side of town, and who would we meet but old Huckleberry, following his nose.
And I once was arriving at a park when I saw a young woman's Afghan see something and take off towards a busy street.
Those Borzois are very majestic-looking, but they look like a lot of responsibility!
The sight hounds can be total clowns when they are with their families. It's only with strangers that they tend to be aloof.

At the time we had the Borzoi, we lived in rural Alaska, though still on a road system. All our dogs at that time ran loose, two Borzoi, an Afghan/husky, and a border collie. The younger Borzoi, the very first time we left him home alone - usually we took all the dogs along, they all loved riding in the car - rearranged the house. Pillows from upstairs came downstairs, boots that were downstairs went up onto the bed, a small bear skin that was mounted about 8' off the floor ended up draped over the couch... and a lot of other things, too. He didnít destroy or chew anything, just put it all where he wanted! We never did figure out how he got the bear skin down.

Another thing he did was play tag with a horse we were taking care of. They would take turns chasing each other from one end of the fence [about 3/4 of an acre] to the other, and when they finally wore themselves out, the horse would lay down and the dog would drape himself over itís rib cage. I always wished Iíd managed to get a picture of that. The funniest thing about that was that the dog had no trouble jumping over the horseís water trough [an old bathtub] longways, but he didnít believe he could actually get into the car by himself. Every time I opened the door, he'd get his front paws on the seat and then Iíd get this pitiful look like ĎMom? Help me?í and Iíd have to boost him up.

Of course, there was very little traffic there, and the roads were gravel, so there was no speeding of any kind. I would never keep dogs that way here in the states, thereís just too many things that can happen to them.
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