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Old 05-21-2009, 04:16 PM
 
14 posts, read 40,740 times
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Hi, I never knew about this till recently too. Miami, FL has a quick kill shelter, they kill 30,000 dogs a year at least. I tried to adopt one, fell in love with her over the website. Called to ask if she was still available and they said yes. Next day was going to drive down since I live 2.5 hrs north, called to check if she'd been adopted before driving, and she was already put down. I had no idea she'd be put to sleep that fast, she'd only been there 5 days. I didn't even know to ask to extend the "due date". I feel so horrible about it, and can't stop thinking about how she could've had a long happy life with me, and that these animals have no chance. It hurts to think that people give up their pet to this place after years of unconditional love, and trust.
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Old 05-21-2009, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Hot Springs, Arkansas
452 posts, read 1,528,631 times
Reputation: 287
LEORAH.... you're a true GEM!!
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Old 05-27-2009, 02:57 AM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,414 posts, read 5,115,776 times
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I'd like to share some hopeful news with all of you who have posted here.

Earlier this month I attended the National No Kill Conference. It was held at the George Washington University Law School and there were over 350 attendees. The conference had two tracks - a sheltering tract for people involved in animal welfare and a legal track that covered things like Legislating and Litigating an end to Puppy Mills and another on Legislating No Kill.

Things are getting better, although not as fast as we'd all like. But here's a link to the Keynote Address given by Nathan Winograd. He is the author of a book called Redemption, The Myth of Pet Overpopulation.

No Kill Conference - Keynote Address - The No Kill Nation (http://thenokillnation.ning.com/profiles/blogs/no-kill-conference-keynote - broken link)

Before reading his book I too believed that we can't save them all, there just are not enough good homes for them. But that's just not true.

Did you know that only about 15% of all the new dogs and cats that people will get this year will come from municipal pounds and private shelters. The rest come from pet stores, which get most of their stock from puppy mills, back yard breeders, and people who wind up with an oops litter because they didn't get their dog spayed.

In 1970 about 24 million homeless cats and dogs were euthanized. In 2007 that number was down to 3.7 million. The number of households with at least one pet is growing. So now what has to happen is the rescue world needs to gain market share. Only about 10% of all dogs and cats that wind up in shelters are truly irredeemably ill or vicious. For the most part government run, open admission shelters, do a terrible job of "marketing" the animals in their care. So the public turns to other sources.

There is a 10 point plan known as the No Kill Equation that details all the things that must be done in order for every adoptable animal to find a forever home. But it is a recipe that must include all 10 ingredients.

Some people will say that No Kill is impossible or that the only way to do it is to warehouse animals for years and years. That's not what the No Kill Movement is about.

You can learn about it here:

http://www.nokilladvocacycenter.org/reforming-animal-control.html (broken link)

I hope that you will find these links very informative and inspiring too. That you will share what you learn with others and help make this a No Kill Nation.
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Old 05-27-2009, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
1,479 posts, read 7,021,637 times
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Zugor, very good points. Everyone interested in animal welfare should read the No Kill Equation. It lists plenty of opportunities for everyone to help advance the cause of animal welfare and move toward a no-kill future.

Here are some ways everyone can help:

I work with a breed rescue group, and we have over time developed good relationships with many shelters, who will call us when they get a dog of our breed or a related mix. Unfortunately, some shelters are still reluctant to call us and/or give us resistance when we try to pull a dog from them. If you have a local shelter, encourage them to enlist the help of local rescues.

We are always looking for reliable foster homes. If you have a fenced yard and no small kids, your home might be ideal as a foster home. Call a local rescue and volunteer.

All of our dogs are spayed/neutered and receive dental checks/cleanings and any other treatment required. We have a network of generous veterinarians and veterinary specialists who provide us with discounted rates. Nevertheless, our average expenditure per dog is about $700. If you have a reputable local rescue/private shelter, encourage them to provide this care and help them find ways to fund it.

Animals in transition often need behavioral intervention. We are fortunate in that we have a network of trainers who provide free consultations. If you are a trainer or behaviorist or know one, encourage them to offer their help to local shelters/rescues.

We work with pet owners to help them find ways to keep their dogs rather than surrender them (if it is a good home, of course.) If you know someone who is having problems with their pet, encourage them to seek assistance from the local SPCA or reputable rescue group. If they purchased the dog from a breeder, ask them to call the breeder for assistance.

If you can't foster and can't adopt, offer to work an adoption day at your local shelter. Offer to do publicity. Visit the shelter and play with or walk the dogs. Spend time with the cats. Socialization and human contact are important to the mental health of caged animals.

Remember, your first offers may be rebuffed. Don't take it personally and don't get angry. Keep trying. Change is hard for many organizations to accept and to manage, but true change has to come from within.
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Old 05-28-2009, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Mountains of middle TN
5,242 posts, read 13,993,609 times
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Those sound like great ideas, but you're going to have to get the country behind you and get them to start being responsible. In the northeast and the west coast they seem to really be getting this under control. But come visit KY, TN, GA, AL, MS, and LA. I see dead dogs in the roads daily. I see litters of puppies in yards all over. No one here spays or neuters. And I've been working with the county on it. They offer certificates that drops the price for spay / neuter to $35 and I've offered to pay that if people will just get it done. I've offered to bring food to low income families for their dogs if they just won't dump them in shelters. They look at me like I'm crazy.

The issue right now I think honestly, is my area. We need help here. And it's not going to be educating the adults; you can't tell them anything. It's going to be getting in the schools and talking to the kids in the hopes that the next generation can get something done.
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Old 05-28-2009, 06:43 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,579 posts, read 74,469,498 times
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for those that dont know SPCA is just another phrase for nazi gas chambers for pets.
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Old 05-29-2009, 11:30 AM
 
Location: NYC
304 posts, read 1,150,420 times
Reputation: 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrs1885 View Post
Those sound like great ideas, but you're going to have to get the country behind you and get them to start being responsible. In the northeast and the west coast they seem to really be getting this under control. But come visit KY, TN, GA, AL, MS, and LA. I see dead dogs in the roads daily. I see litters of puppies in yards all over. No one here spays or neuters. And I've been working with the county on it. They offer certificates that drops the price for spay / neuter to $35 and I've offered to pay that if people will just get it done. I've offered to bring food to low income families for their dogs if they just won't dump them in shelters. They look at me like I'm crazy.

The issue right now I think honestly, is my area. We need help here. And it's not going to be educating the adults; you can't tell them anything. It's going to be getting in the schools and talking to the kids in the hopes that the next generation can get something done.
Yes -- the only way to control the problem (ever) is to change attitudes, _mandate_ spay-neuter, and shut down puppymills/backyard breeders (and boost the view that it's moronic, tacky, and uncool to buy from such greedbags).

Anything else is a drop in the bucket. We can rescue, foster and adopt 'til hell freezes over, and we'll still have overflowing shelters and euth lists.
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Old 04-18-2012, 10:36 PM
 
1 posts, read 692 times
Reputation: 19
I worked at a shelter in the Bay Area. Everyone there did everything they could to get animals adopted out. However due to more pitbulls found on the street from being abandoned or just dumped out somewhere, this one shelter had a higher intake of pitbulls than any other dog. That is how I learned that pits are wonderful dogs. I spent more time with these little guys and especially when I was told certain ones were going to be put down due to no one coming forward to adopt him/her. I would take these dogs out to play with for their very last time of any type of happiness before being put to sleep. It gave me some joy to know I gave joy to these sweet dogs. Every time one was put down, I went home & cried for days. But I would go back to find other dogs who needed my help.
Shelters are over ran with unwanted dogs. I am not a fan of animal killing at all but people need to stop buying and breeding dogs. There are so many wonderful animals just waiting for a good home with someone to love.
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Old 04-19-2012, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Kansas
19,186 posts, read 14,973,347 times
Reputation: 18249
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amazonchix View Post
Pets here get 72 hours to get claimed/pulled for adoption prior to euthanizing at our city shelter. That's why I'm always lecturing people on IMPORTANCE of tags/microchipping and going to the shelter and looking rather than relying on staff to say whether a pet is there or not.
I wanted to say this is excellent advice. Years ago our 4 year old dog got outside in a storm and disappeared and to make it worse, it was a new neighborhood for us. We called the shelter and described our dog and the shelter worker said they had picked up a dog but this did not sound like the dog we described (small shelter too) but we could come take a look. I was trolling the neighborhood and my husband went to the shelter. He looked in the cage and by the way she was acting, he didn't even think it was her at first. A very out-going Elkhound-Border Collie mix was just withdrawn and hovering in the back of the kennel - she did sort of look like a coyote though. So, had we not have went................We recently got our dog micro-chipped and I have explained that I know we always have her on a leash and that she is yard-trained but we fear something happening when we are not home, especially weather related.

Most shelters do not, cannot keep dogs very many days because of space and funding thus the importance of spay/neuter. Here spay/neuter starts at $35.00 on a sliding scale and people still don't bother. Also, why it is important to consider adoption from a shelter or humane society.

Right now, I am in an area of the country that places very little value on domesticated animals and it makes me sick!
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Old 04-19-2012, 11:31 AM
 
13,297 posts, read 25,491,832 times
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What area of the country is that?
In Massachusetts, groups import puppies from Midwest or Southern states because spaying/neutering has been so successful. One group brings in hounds, hounds, hounds from the South.
Of course, there are still way too many pitties because of the a**wads who get them in the city for all the wrong reasons. My thoughts are to the poster who works at a shelter and gives the dogs a last good moment before euthanasia. That takes a very sturdy heart. I try to remember, at least the dogs aren't being tortured, starving, hurt on the street, and they die without suffering. But still it's searing. Hats off again to that poster and everyone that works in rescue and shelters.
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