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Old 08-30-2008, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Blackwater Park
1,715 posts, read 6,385,019 times
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I think if people actually put a prong collar on themselves and gave a correction more people would be accepting of prong collars.

I haven't purchased one, but I'm really close to.
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Old 08-30-2008, 08:50 AM
 
Location: "The Sunshine State"
4,334 posts, read 12,198,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike in TN View Post
I think if people actually put a prong collar on themselves and gave a correction more people would be accepting of prong collars.

I haven't purchased one, but I'm really close to.
I think if more people actually put a prong collar on themselves and gave a correction more people would be alot less accepting of prong collars!

I have never purchased one and never will!
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Old 08-30-2008, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
1,479 posts, read 7,014,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike in TN View Post
I think if people actually put a prong collar on themselves and gave a correction more people would be accepting of prong collars.

I haven't purchased one, but I'm really close to.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondie621 View Post
I think if more people actually put a prong collar on themselves and gave a correction more people would be alot less accepting of prong collars!

I have never purchased one and never will!
Dogs have both breed and individual characteristics. These characteristics help determine what training techniques and tools will be most effective for a particular dog. I'm a strong advocate for positive training techniques. That being said, a well-fitted and properly used prong collar can be much safer for a strong adult dog that pulls and lunges than a standard flat buckle collar. Prong collars can help appropriately channel herding and prey drive responses, for example, without choking the dog. The goal is not to apply a correction but to redirect the behavior that will result in a correction. Big difference, IMHO.

Some breeds and smaller dogs can have tracheal collapse as a result of poorly fitted and improperly used collars. Buckle type and even martingale collars are problems for them. For these dogs, a harness often works best.

IMO, there's no one best answer. Just like children and adults have different learning styles based on their genetic make-up and environmental influences, dogs vary in the way they respond to training techniques. A dog that is successfully trained and controlled by the judicious and humane use of a prong collar is much better off than a dog in a flat collar that is inadequately controlled and becomes a danger to itself, other humans and other dogs.
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Old 08-30-2008, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
2,375 posts, read 5,358,665 times
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My dogs only wear their harnesses when they are off of our property, otherwise no collar.

Our dogs are also never left in the yard without supervision, so no worries on them escaping the yard.
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Old 08-30-2008, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,107 posts, read 35,124,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post
Should towns, counties or states put a restriction the sale of dog collars.
IMO, No
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Old 08-30-2008, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Jax
8,204 posts, read 32,160,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leorah View Post
Dogs have both breed and individual characteristics. These characteristics help determine what training techniques and tools will be most effective for a particular dog. I'm a strong advocate for positive training techniques. That being said, a well-fitted and properly used prong collar can be much safer for a strong adult dog that pulls and lunges than a standard flat buckle collar. Prong collars can help appropriately channel herding and prey drive responses, for example, without choking the dog. The goal is not to apply a correction but to redirect the behavior that will result in a correction. Big difference, IMHO.
I think that's really true. There are situations that warrant a prong collar.

I'm using one now on the adult pit we took in. She had never been leash trained and was already 2 years old, so we had a lot of work to do. For the first week or two she would actually strain the leash so much she was walking upright - she had no idea how to walk on a leash. The regular choke collar was the wrong choice for her, the prong collar gave her the correction that was needed (which was actually a more gentle correction considering what she was doing on her end of the leash). It was a dramatic change when we made the switch. She's almost ready to be taken off the prong collar and back on a regular choke collar now, we're just working out a few more issues of passing dogs on the street.

If you've never tried one, you can always test one on your arm in the pet store just to see how they work...it feels different than you'd expect from the appearance.

But they're not for all dogs, I can't see putting one on a small dog, for example.

If we're going to outlaw anything, let's outlaw those retractable leashes...I hate those things!
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Old 08-30-2008, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Jax
8,204 posts, read 32,160,564 times
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I should add, in the house, no collars whatsoever.

They have nice rounded leather collars for when we want them to wear one, but we don't bother with them often. That's just how we do it here though, I see no problem with a dog wearing a house collar (just no choke/pinch/prong collars ever - those are only for walking/training).
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Old 08-30-2008, 01:11 PM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,853,550 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riveree View Post

If you've never tried one, you can always test one on your arm in the pet store just to see how they work...it feels different than you'd expect from the appearance.
Yes indeed. They really are not that bad.
I used one on Elwood when he was younger, and every now and then I still do, depending on where we are.
Quote:
If we're going to outlaw anything, let's outlaw those retractable leashes...I hate those things!
I *so* agree.
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Old 08-30-2008, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK.
75 posts, read 343,696 times
Reputation: 87
All the training collars(prong, choke, & martingale) have their proper place & time. I have used all three types when training my dogs.
I show on a choke collar while in the obedience ring. Since there are no corrections allowed, it is just an attachment point for the leash. My dogs know which collar they have on and what is expected of then at that time.
They always have a flat collar with their I.D. & rabies tags attached.
I also teach obedience classes and it depends on the individual dog what type of collar is recommended for class/training.
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Old 08-31-2008, 04:08 AM
 
3,627 posts, read 12,783,329 times
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If anyone decides to purchase a pinch collar [aka prong] I highly recommend a Herm Springer brand in stainless steel. Actually, I HAVE put a pinch collar on my leg PROPERLY and given myself a correction. If the collar is not properly fitted the prongs dig into the neck instead of catching and pinching the skin. The skin on a dogs neck, by the way, is typically looser and thicker than the rest of their body and their skin is not as securely attached to the underlying muscle as ours is.

The design [flat plate for connection] makes it easier to undo links and the prongs are rounded and smooth, not flat and "sharp".

I don't really have much use for the quick release version as it seems to be more work to me to put on than the standard version.

There are several sizes - actually the smaller the link, the harsher the correction.
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