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Old 08-24-2008, 09:21 PM
 
5 posts, read 26,335 times
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Okay so I adopted a 90lb dog two weeks ago. She is part Great Pyrenees, part Anatolion Shepherd. She is one year old and spent her first year of life living outside on a farm outside of Dallas. Her first two weeks at my house were very frightening for her. She has spent 90% of her time hiding in one of three spots in the house - where she created her own little den - which is fine. But now she is outside tonight and I cannot for the life of me get her back inside. She has eaten practically nothing since I've had her. Food will NOT work to lure her anywhere. I've tried putting the leash on her, she will NOT budge even one step. I don't know what to do. I'm beside myself. She is safe in the backyard, but I don't believe in keeping dogs outside. I want this to be our family dog but she isn't allowing this to happen.... I have contacted a trainer to hopefully come work with us but it will be VERY expensive to have someone come to my house for private training. Can anyone else give me any other suggestions?
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Old 08-24-2008, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Blackwater Park
1,715 posts, read 6,394,588 times
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If she wants to be outside why not just let her stay outside? Some dogs prefer to sleep outdoors.

I don't have the answers, but it sounds like she's scarred and nervous. My adopted dog was like this as well at first. For the first three or four days I had to feed him out of my hand, and even then it would only be a couple of bits at a time. Don't freak out though, dogs have a survival instinct - she's not going to let herself starve to death.

One thing I would do, and I don't know if this even makes sense to anyone else, if just follow her to where she is comfortable and just hang out with her there. I think that might help to build a bond with her. I'd steer clear of the leash for a while unless it was a necessity.
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Old 08-24-2008, 09:59 PM
 
Location: "The Sunshine State"
4,334 posts, read 12,225,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lizindallas View Post
Okay so I adopted a 90lb dog two weeks ago. She is part Great Pyrenees, part Anatolion Shepherd. She is one year old and spent her first year of life living outside on a farm outside of Dallas. Her first two weeks at my house were very frightening for her. She has spent 90% of her time hiding in one of three spots in the house - where she created her own little den - which is fine. But now she is outside tonight and I cannot for the life of me get her back inside. She has eaten practically nothing since I've had her. Food will NOT work to lure her anywhere. I've tried putting the leash on her, she will NOT budge even one step. I don't know what to do. I'm beside myself. She is safe in the backyard, but I don't believe in keeping dogs outside. I want this to be our family dog but she isn't allowing this to happen.... I have contacted a trainer to hopefully come work with us but it will be VERY expensive to have someone come to my house for private training. Can anyone else give me any other suggestions?
Ok...#1 She has fear of the house!
It is all new to her. Bring her in the house if you have to drag her. Talk softly to her while pulling her. I have had to do this before also. My Jenny was an outside dog and she would not come in either....I had to drag her and sit with her in the laundry room at first. Every step she would take was with great caution. I know it may sound mean but you have to win her trust over. She needs alot of TLC and time spent with her. Do you work? Or are you home all day? You might want to get a huge crate for her at night and keep it next to your bed for a while until she adjusts. Anyway she needs time, love and lots of positive re-enforcement. You cannot just ignore her. She might have had some abuse in her past also. Good luck, I know you can win her over and make her at home.... inside.... where she belongs!
If she is hiding in certain spots, sit with her there! Give her a toy, a biscuit..and try to leave her food there. You can also boil some chicken and mix it with her dry food...I bet she will eat that! Make sure she has peace and quiet when you feed her. Make her feel comfortable wherever she is.....let her adjust...it will take time!
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Old 08-25-2008, 05:13 AM
 
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Neither one of these breeds is particularly an inside people kind of dog. They were bred to live outside with livestock and guard them. With such a big dog and of breeds presdisposed to guarding behaviors, you may want to spend the money for expert training. Being on a farm and guarding a flock would be heaven for this dog.

You figure it is normal to expect this dog to be uncomfortable inside as this was not part of her socialization during the critical puppy periods. I would take it slowly and carefully and not expect too much to quick.
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Old 08-25-2008, 05:14 AM
 
5 posts, read 26,335 times
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Thanks for the replies.
I don't really agree with letting dogs live outside - particularily alone. At the last place she lived at, she at least lived outside with her mother and father. Here she is alone in the backyard and that is a bad recipe for her. Dogs are pack animals - she needs to be inside with her new pack.

It is VERY hard to drag a 90lb dog anywhere. Like last night, I had my 6 month old baby to put to sleep. There was no way I could drag this dog inside. I have been as loving and gentle as possible with this girl in her hiding spots. I've been told by a dog trainer in town and in the Dog Whisperer book that by even just talking to the dog while she is in her hiding spot, I've reinforced that it's okay for her to be there.

I love dogs and this dog is awesome - at least she has awesome dog potential. But I'm overwhelmed right now. I specifically told the rescue group what my home situation was like - I can't believe they allowed this poor dog to live outside with no socialization to humans and I can't believe they told me she was the right match for me. I am not the type to give up on a dog, but I don't have unlimited time on my hands right now. I do work from home so I am here with her all the time and if anything, we are going backwards... I'm considering hiring a private dog trainer to come help out, but it's ridiculously expensive. But I have no idea what else to do....

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Old 08-25-2008, 05:33 AM
 
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Personally, I would not feel bad about returning the dog. I do not think a dog stronger than you is the dog you want in the house with a 6 month old child. And trying to force a scared dog to do anything is a good way to get bit. The dog is already socialized to other animals. I could make a good farm dog and be happy. Historically both of these breeds were raised with the sheep, goats, whatever and became a part of the livestock pack.

For now, you are not part of her pack and it may take months to bond with her, maybe longer. Until she is bonded with you she won't feel comfortable following you in the house.
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Old 08-25-2008, 05:35 AM
 
5 posts, read 26,335 times
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I have never returned a dog before and I'm actually considering it now - and I'm sooo upset about it. I want to give this dog everything she needs but I feel like I'm working backwards with her. I know at least she would be with the other dogs outside at that farm - here she is alone and I feel horrible for her.

I'm so upset with the group that matched her with me....
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Old 08-25-2008, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Right where I want to be.
4,507 posts, read 8,027,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lizindallas View Post
Thanks for the replies.
I don't really agree with letting dogs live outside - particularily alone. At the last place she lived at, she at least lived outside with her mother and father. Here she is alone in the backyard and that is a bad recipe for her. Dogs are pack animals - she needs to be inside with her new pack.

It is VERY hard to drag a 90lb dog anywhere. Like last night, I had my 6 month old baby to put to sleep. There was no way I could drag this dog inside. I have been as loving and gentle as possible with this girl in her hiding spots. I've been told by a dog trainer in town and in the Dog Whisperer book that by even just talking to the dog while she is in her hiding spot, I've reinforced that it's okay for her to be there.

I love dogs and this dog is awesome - at least she has awesome dog potential. But I'm overwhelmed right now. I specifically told the rescue group what my home situation was like - I can't believe they allowed this poor dog to live outside with no socialization to humans and I can't believe they told me she was the right match for me. I am not the type to give up on a dog, but I don't have unlimited time on my hands right now. I do work from home so I am here with her all the time and if anything, we are going backwards... I'm considering hiring a private dog trainer to come help out, but it's ridiculously expensive. But I have no idea what else to do....

Why would you take an outside dog then?? Just because YOU don't believe in letting a dog live outside doesn't mean this dog is going to agree with you. Honestly, your forcing her to meet your desire for an inside companion seems very selfish to me when she is clearly an outside dog.

How long are you walking her each day? Go outside where she is comfortable...play and hang out with her there. When you come in and out leave the door wide open for her to choose to follow you, or not. You may be looking at getting at least one more dog to hang out with her, one that is comfortable both in and out of the house.

But, it seems like it might be best for the dog if you turned her back in to be placed with a family who will appreciate her desire to be outdoors, in a setting where she is more at home. With a 6 mo old baby I doubt you have time to dedicate to this dog either way. Then you can get a dog that wants to be in the house with you.
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Old 08-25-2008, 06:02 AM
 
Location: California
10,091 posts, read 36,875,655 times
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I agree...this does not sound like an ideal match. What you want (and think is right) is clearly not what the dog feels comfortable with. Why force the issue? She has been raised in the outdoors and no matter how strongly you feel, nothing will change that. The dogs comfort zone is outside! With lots of work and patience and time....you may entice her indoors...but I'll bet she'll always feel more comfortable outside. Good luck...I know it will be a hard decision...but you must do what is right for the dog and you.
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Old 08-25-2008, 06:02 AM
 
3,627 posts, read 12,821,207 times
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Having been the one day victim of a well-minded but uninformed rescue organization I can see they figured this dog would be perfect for her because often they are good minded folks who may or may not know that much about the dogs they are placing - - -
I had an experience where they had already formed in their mind the dog that would be "perfect" for me, which was a crippled and feaful dog, and it was returned within a day. [I was very clear up front that I already had a dog with health problems and did not/would not take on another dog with health problems and that I was interested in a drivey confident dog - I could immediately tell the dog was dysplastic or had other severe problems with its back end]

Meanwhile, the high drive confident GSD that I could have done something with [having owned them and worked with them for years] went do a kid with no dog experience.

So I can believe they talked her into this dog and are going to try to talk her out of returning it.
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