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Old 10-02-2008, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Where I want to be!
6,196 posts, read 4,912,622 times
Reputation: 2577

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Here is the problem for which I am at a total loss. One of my boys have decided after 4 yrs that he is no longer house trained. This started a couple of weeks ago for no reason. First he peed on my quilt and left a pile in the foyer on the same night. About a 4 days later he figured out how to open the trash can by stepping on the peddle. This woke me up because I heard it beating on the end of the breakfast bar. Well now he pushes it out into the open, steps on the peddle and gets the garbage out. Now last night he not only drug the trash all over the house he got on the counter and opened the cookie jar and then he found the cake and licked the frosting off, although he was kind enough to remove the tin foil and attempted to put it back. He knew he was in trouble and dropped his head and ran to the door to go out before I saw my kitchen. Needless to say he is still out there while I scrub my house.
There have been no changes around here, he still goes outside when ever he wants, no new animals or people and no change in routine. HELP!
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Old 10-02-2008, 10:15 AM
 
Location: California
10,091 posts, read 36,856,826 times
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First off...there surely is a reason. If nothing has changed in and around the household...it is probably medical. I would suggest making a vet visit.
An animal just doesn't decide to start defecating in the house on a whim.
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Old 10-02-2008, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Florida
1,738 posts, read 7,509,096 times
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I say medical!
you working less or more ? new smell(perfume) ...holiday decoations? .....critters outside?
go back to basics if it isn't medical! Treat doggie like a puppy until he can be trusted again.
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Old 10-02-2008, 10:29 AM
 
7,079 posts, read 34,520,304 times
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How are you cleaning up the mess? You need something WITHOUT ammonia, which actually degrades into something that smells like urine. I would suggest something like anti-icky poo (yes, there IS a product with that name) or Simple Solution, that contains enzymes, to thoroughly clean any area.

Regarding the urination: make sure he doesn't have a urinary tract infection. Not being able to 'hold it' is the first sign of a UTI! He needs to be checked out by the vet.
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Old 10-02-2008, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Where I want to be!
6,196 posts, read 4,912,622 times
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Okay no urinary infections, vet checked, has only urninated 2 X in month it is behavioral. If he would of left his pile AFTER his trash raid I would understand but he didn't. I never use ammonia based products for the very reason mentioned, don't need to encourage accidents. My question is why this sudden interest in climbing on the counter and being to smart about opening up containers to get to cookies, cake, trash ect. These boys have been trained you can set a steak on the coffee table and leave the room, they wont touch it!
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Old 10-02-2008, 11:18 AM
 
Location: California
10,091 posts, read 36,856,826 times
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If it is truly a behavior issue (and sorry, I still have my doubts), try some Rescue Remedy and see if that curtails his behavior.
When is the last time he had full blown check-up? UTI's can be absent one day and there the next. It is painful and causes the odd behavior.
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Old 10-02-2008, 12:27 PM
 
7,079 posts, read 34,520,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShelbyGirl1 View Post
If it is truly a behavior issue (and sorry, I still have my doubts), try some Rescue Remedy and see if that curtails his behavior.
When is the last time he had full blown check-up? UTI's can be absent one day and there the next. It is painful and causes the odd behavior.
UTIs don't simply come and go, but it's difficult to actually pick up the bug in culture. You can still get the urine and check the pH and look for white blood cells, because normal urine should have only a couple of white blood cells at the most. But getting the organism isolated in culture can be extremely difficult.
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Old 10-02-2008, 12:32 PM
 
Location: California
10,091 posts, read 36,856,826 times
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"UTIs don't simply come and go, but it's difficult to actually pick up the bug in culture."

I agree....I guess I didn't state it clearly. What I meant...was even if he had no UTI last week or at the last vet check...One certainly could have surfaced since then Didn't mean to imply, they come and go.
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Old 10-02-2008, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Where I want to be!
6,196 posts, read 4,912,622 times
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Okay----twice in a month, still not acting like UTI. And do you really think a UTI would cause him to get on the counter to open the jar and have a midnight snack of cookies or get the trash out and scatter it??
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Old 10-02-2008, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
1,479 posts, read 7,033,372 times
Reputation: 1908
Default Voracious appetite...

You may want to take your dog back to the vet and get more tests done, including T3/T4 and ACTH. Cushing's and thyroid issues can cause an increased appetite as well as increased water consumption and inappropriate defecation and urination. These diseases are often difficult to diagnose without proper testing and many vets won't suspect an adrenal or thyroid issue until the disease manifests itself in more significant ways.

Sudden behavioral issues such as you describe, particularly the aggressive appetite in an otherwise well-trained dog, often signify a medical foundation for the behavior.
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