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Old 11-30-2008, 08:12 PM
 
Location: San Diego
5,050 posts, read 8,022,422 times
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Default How to get puppy to stop peeing in the house

So we have a 3 month old English Bulldog, Porkchop, that loves to pee in the house. We take him out many times a day, during which he just will not pee. He has no problem pooping outside, but there have been many occasions where he would pee on the carpet as soon as we got back from the walk.

We didn't want to use pee pads in the house, but we finally got some, and he used them a couple of times. Now, he will pee pretty much wherever he is standing, usually on the carpet. It's getting to the point that we want to lock him up in the kitchen, which has hardwood floors, until he outgrows this ridiculous habit. Are we doing something wrong? He goes out regularly, when we catch him in the act we yell No and take him outside, but none of it is working. Any advice is greatly apprreciated, as our house is beginning to smell really bad!
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Old 11-30-2008, 10:12 PM
 
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We spent a lot of time in the kitchen when ours was young. That said, 3 months is very young, they're just developing their bladder and bowel muscle control and it takes a while for most to 'get it', try not to be discouraged or even yell b/c you dont want him to become a sneaky piddler - just say "No!" when you see him start to squat and take him outside fast - would also walk him in your yard (if you have one) on a leash, that way he'll know he's out there to 'go', not to play (he can play later), also giving him a very small but tasty treat (chicken, steak or cheese) may help reinforce it along w/ lots of praise. Would also close bedroom doors etc so he has less room to roam and watch him like a hawk, when he wakes up take him out, after he eats etc, in the beginning it's lots of repetition and sometimes it's frustrating and seems like it's going to take a while but he'll catch on - hang in there - and congrats on your pup, btw, I love English bulldogs!

PS Crate training may help too, at least overnite (not sure if you are), would take him out in the middle of the nite if you hear him whining in his crate, it's no fun but we did that rather than wake up to a wet or poopy crate (and most of the time, she had to go so it was worth it, but you dont want them to stay in a wet or poopy crate, it's a bad habit and something they have to unlearn, they want to be clean. Anyway, if he's not been crated yet, would go slow at first, you could feed him in it which will encourage him to like it but you dont want to overcrate a puppy either.
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Old 12-01-2008, 05:56 AM
 
Location: California
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First...when you take him out on the lead...stand with him...UNTIL he goes. It may take awhile and patience is the key. DO NOT COME BACK INDOORS UNTIL HE GOES! You know he has to go...so take the time and stay out there with him. This is not a play time...just stand with him in the yard...when he finally does go, praise the heck out of him and then come in. He has to learn the difference between play time and peeing time. Keep giving him a command to go...ie with my dogs, the command is "go". And they do, each and every time.
Next, be sure you are cleaning the spots in the house where he has gone very well. Use some type of an enzyme cleaner such as Stink Free...(or any enzyme cleaner sold in most pet stores)you may think you have cleaned well, but the pooch's nose is very sensitive and can detect the least little odor...he may try and remark the spot.
At 3 months, he is still yet a baby and you wouldn't expect a 5 month old to be potty trained. It is physically impossible. So, patience. Crate training is a great way to contain them at night or when you can not be with them. Dogs will usually not soil where they sleep.
Also...with hold the water after 7pm or so, this will help him get thru the night...
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Old 12-01-2008, 05:57 AM
 
Location: California
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another thought....he must be taken out every 45 min. or so....He will soon get the idea what is expected of him. But he must be taught...he will just not "outgrow" this.
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Old 12-01-2008, 06:13 AM
 
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First, your puppy is ONLY THREE MONTHS OLD!!!!

He BARELY has any control over his bladder or bowel at this point. You're expecting WAY TOO MUCH from him right now. Like human infants, puppies neurologically mature into being able to 'hold it.' Just as we don't expect human babies to be toilet trained when they're six months old, you can't expect a three month old puppy, with no control over the muscle that holds his bladder closed, to be housetrained, or even APPROACHING it.

Follow the instructions below TO THE LETTER and you'll have a housetrained dog. NOT immediately, or even within a month. The nervous system of the dog has to mature, and at around six months you can expect a lot more. But follow the instructions below EXACTLY (and everyone in the house needs to do the same!!!) and you'll have success.

And remember, NO SCOLDING: it makes the dog think that 'going' is bad and he'll do it where you won't see it (until you step in it). My method has trained TONS of classically 'hard to train' breeds, such as pugs, very successfully. And remember, if he has an accident in a place where you're upset, it's YOUR fault, not his, because you let him go there!

Here's the method:
Housetraining your dog (puppy or adult!)

The first thing you need to do is to remember that you’re trying to reinforce a new behavior. That means that the rewards for this behavior must be WONDERFUL. NOT crap from the store. Wonderful treats are poached chicken breast/turkey breast, cheese and steak. And you don’t have to use big pieces. Tiny pieces (about 3mm cubes) are just fine! I poach a whole turkey breast every few weeks, cut it into hunks when it’s cool enough to handle, wrap them well and store them in the freezer. When I need some, I’ll thaw a hunk overnight and cut off pieces and dice finely, storing them in a plastic bag in the fridge. One hunk will last about five days. Cheese is also popular, so variety is fine.

I carry these plastic bags in my jacket pockets in the winter and in a fanny pack in warmer weather. You HAVE to have these with you, or this method won’t work, because you need to reward as soon as the dog finishes pooping or peeing. It’s not going to work if the rewards are in the house.

Remember that you’re trying to change a very ingrained behavior. Some dogs like to feel certain things under their feet when they eliminate, like fabric, or newspaper. This is called a ‘substrate preference.’ What you’re trying to do is change this substrate preference, and to do that you have to make the treats SO wonderful that the dog will change this very well-entrenched behavior. Thus the chicken, cheese, steak.

I love clicker training, but this can be done without clickers. You just need a way to ‘mark’ the behavior you want to reinforce. Use the word ‘YESSSSS!!!!’ very enthusiastically – that works for some.

You’re going to need to GO OUTSIDE WITH your dog and the dog needs to be on a leash. Yes, even in winter. If you don’t reward IMMEDIATELY after the event (when dog immediately finishes pooping or peeing) and wait inside, the dog is going to be reinforced for coming inside, not for doing its business. So, leash up your dog. STAND IN ONE PLACE. Be boring. Bring a book or magazine for yourself.

Eventually, the dog will do what you’re waiting for. The NANOSECOND that the dog is finished, HAVE A PARTY – lots of loud, high-pitched praise, treats and running around. You want to make this memorable for your dog! You’ll find that once the first event is achieved, the others will come more quickly. Keep on treating (you don’t have to throw a party except for milestones – a milestone = if he only pooped outside but now peed, too, or something equivalent to that) until he’s good and used to peeing/pooping outside. Before you know it, you have a trained dog.

Regarding accidents in the house: NO SCOLDING. Just clean them up. If you scold you’ll get the dog to think it’s bad to pee or poop and he’ll do it in places you won’t see. Until you step in it. Invest in a big bottle of Nature’s Miracle or Simple Solution and use it liberally on accidents.

With young puppies, remember they have little control of the muscle that holds the bladder closed. This is something they grow into. Just as it’s not expected that a human baby is toilet trained at six months, don’t expect much from a puppy. Patience, patience, patience!!!! The nervous system in a puppy has to mature, and it won’t have much control over the sphincter (closing muscle) at the neck of the bladder until six or seven months. The same goes for the anal sphincter. Until control is achieved, both of these muscles operate on reflex: there are stretch receptors in the bladder wall. When the bladder is full, it sends impulses to the spinal cord and these, in turn, send signals to the sphincter to open and the dog pees.

In the stomach wall, there are also stretch receptors. So when the dog eats and the stomach is stretched, the impulses again go to the spinal cord, but this time the reflex, outgoing, nerve signals are sent to the anal sphincter, so the dog defecates. This operates in people, too – which is why some people rush to the ‘reading room’ after a meal – especially breakfast.
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Old 12-01-2008, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Lexington, KY
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We followed ViralMD's steps and our now 4 month old pup is a pro! I highly recommend it!
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Old 12-01-2008, 09:21 AM
 
Location: San Diego
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We tried a crate at first, but he literally screamed for two hours while in it, pooped and peed, then rolled in it. There was only room for him in the crate, since we were told that he won't pee where he sleeps. Right. Not our dog. He was completely covered in feces and we sold the crate. We have a baby gate in the kitchen and that is his room. He stays there when we go out and overnight. It works very well for him and he prefers the freedom of being in the kitchen than a crate. We take him out every hour now, including weekdays, since one of us works from home. He will poop immediately, but won't pee. He does not poop in the house. Ever. Just pee. We will take him out year round, since winter in San Diego is non existent and it's still in the 70s on December 1st. You can walk 20 minutes with him, and he still won't pee outside.

And as far as giving him cheese or turkey, he is an English Bulldog and severly food sensitive. We gave him a treat once, despite our vet telling us never to give him anything other than his food, and he had diarrhea for two days. He can't eat even the purest things without having stomach issues.

We're not scolding him because he can't hold his bladder. The problem here is that we have just been outside for 20 minutes, during which he pooped, and the second we walk into the house, he pees on the carpet. It has nothing to do with him not being able to hold in his bladder. He is taken out, but several times a day will go as soon as we enter our house, on the carpet. It's frustrating and clearly not a problem of bladder control, since he was just out for 20 minutes. We don't expect him to be potty trained at 3 months, but we do expect him to go pee outside when we take him out so many times a day. He just seems to prefer the carpet for that.
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Old 12-01-2008, 09:37 AM
 
Location: California
9,712 posts, read 23,343,664 times
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He does not understand that on a walk he is to do his peeing then! It is why it was said to literally stand in the backyard (or where-ever) with him and give him a command to go. He needs to know WHY is there! Literally stand in one place with his leash giving him only the 4ft circle it will allow and wait until he goes. Then praise and bring him in. You may be spending a looooooooong time out there the first few times...but he'll get the idea sooner or later.
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Old 12-01-2008, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Tupelo,MS
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Everyones ideas posted are great and basically the best way to do it! Congrats on the new puppy (I have an English too) . I will say bulldogs are VERY stubborn. It took me a lot longer to train mine conpared to my other dogs! Be patient! Now my bully is the best dog in the world!
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Old 12-01-2008, 09:51 AM
 
7,081 posts, read 23,915,559 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAK802 View Post
We tried a crate at first, but he literally screamed for two hours while in it, pooped and peed, then rolled in it. There was only room for him in the crate, since we were told that he won't pee where he sleeps. Right. Not our dog.

And as far as giving him cheese or turkey, he is an English Bulldog and severly food sensitive. We gave him a treat once, despite our vet telling us never to give him anything other than his food, and he had diarrhea for two days. He can't eat even the purest things without having stomach issues.

We're not scolding him because he can't hold his bladder. The problem here is that we have just been outside for 20 minutes, during which he pooped, and the second we walk into the house, he pees on the carpet. It has nothing to do with him not being able to hold in his bladder. He is taken out, but several times a day will go as soon as we enter our house, on the carpet. It's frustrating and clearly not a problem of bladder control, since he was just out for 20 minutes. We don't expect him to be potty trained at 3 months, but we do expect him to go pee outside when we take him out so many times a day. He just seems to prefer the carpet for that.
First, you can't just put a dog in a crate and close the door. It's a PROCESS to get a dog trained to enjoy the crate: Crate Training | The Humane Society of the United States (http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/our_pets_for_life_program/dog_behavior_tip_sheets/crate_training.html - broken link) Once they're crate trained, it's bliss!

Second, note that I said TINY treats: I'll bet that his food has some kind of protein souce, likely chicken or beef. So you can make poached chicken breast and cut it into TINY pieces (like 2mm cubes, which are all that are necessary) to get him trained. Whatever the protein source in his food, get more of it and use that to train him. If it's beef, use steak. If it's chicken, use chicken breast (NOT the leg or wing - dark meat is too fatty). Take a look at the side panel of the food if you're not sure.

Food sensitivity, BTW, isn't the rule with bulldogs. One of my upstairs neighbors shows and breeds bulldogs and let me tell you, the ***** she's currently showing eats EVERYTHING (even the fried egg sandwiches that belong to the doorman!!!) with no problems.

Telling him to go potty is going to do nothing until he does it ONCE and is heavily reinforced for doing it. It would be like giving instructions in Urdu to an American who only speaks English. AS HE'S URINATING you can say, 'GOOD POTTY!' or whatever word you choose, and also when you give him his party afterwards, as I described above. THAT will teach him what 'Go Potty!' means. But just telling him 'Go Potty' is going to be as useful as reading the Wall Street Journal to him. He won't understand. YET.

The reason he likes carpet is the substrate preference, the feeling of something soft under his feet, as I've explained in my post above. You have to change that preference and that's HARD. THAT is why you need the non-store-bought great treats, such as chicken or steak.

As I said, he has NO CLUE that he has to go. His bladder is still, like a human baby's on autopilot. When it gets stretched it automatically empties. This is also what is seen in patients with spinal cord injuries and is called 'automatic bladder.' Your pup has to mature neurologically in order to control his bladder. Play, by the way, increases the flow of blood to the kidneys, which, in turn, increases the amount of urine made. So after every 10 minutes of play, or so, take your boy outside with the treats. This DOES work, but you have to be consistent and persistent. And don't expect too much. He's trying! All he really wants to do is please you.
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