U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-10-2008, 06:09 PM
 
47 posts, read 188,119 times
Reputation: 32
Default Teeth cleaning for dogs?

Hello, I am hoping someone can help me here...yesterday, I took my two dogs (both almost 9yrs old, one is a cocker spaniel mix and the other is a schnauzer mix) for routine vaccinations at Banfield Hospital (inside Petsmart).

While examining both of them, he strongly expressed concerns about their teeth, and told me that I need to get them cleaned. He quoted me $189 per dog (although I am sure there are additional hidden fees in there) for a teeth cleaning.

I am trying to figure out if this is really necessary or if it's just totally bogus. I recently moved to the Dallas/Fort Worth area from Phoenix, where we had a wonderful vet at Blue Cross Vet Clinic. If anyone has any suggestions about a good, ethical vet in the DFW area, or thoughts on teeth cleaning, that would be very helpful.

I'd like to add that I have visited Banfield in the past (prior to finding Blue Cross Vet), and the staff tried to upsell me on the Banfield Wellness Plans the entire time. I actually fell for this with the first dog, and ended up spending around $500 on "services" they convinced me that she needed, and there were multiple additional fees at the end of the visit that I was unaware they were charging. As for last night, unfortunately, Banfield still happens to be the most convenient, as far as their location and hours of operation, and the dogs HAD to have these vaccinations before I can board them during Christmas. And the staff here also continued to push their Welllness Plans...that said, I definitely want to find a reputable vet here in the DFW area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-10-2008, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
1,315 posts, read 4,501,906 times
Reputation: 1502
Dogs have the same exposure to dental problems that people do, and most don't have the benefit of daily brushing. Smaller dogs tend to have more dental problems than larger dogs. By the age of 9, it's not unusual at all that a dog's teeth would need cleaning. Many dogs have accumulated quite a bit of plaque and even some periodontal disease by that age. Some extractions may be necessary. $189 for a dental cleaning sounds reasonable. I pay my vet an average of $200 for an annual cleaning for each of my four dogs.

If your dogs DO have periodontal issues and you do not treat them, in addition to the pain caused by the decay, the disease will erode the jawbone, eventually causing a perforation through the upper jaw to the nasal cavity, or causing the lower jaw to weaken and break.

So, no, it is not bogus that your dog's teeth would need cleaning. If you are concerned about the diagnosis, get another opinion, but please don't discount the need to take care of your dogs' dental health.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2008, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
3,838 posts, read 5,261,724 times
Reputation: 5742
It's expensive to get a dog's teeth cleaned, had my 11 year old's done a few months back, and had it done two years previously.

This time the poor guy had an absessed tooth that caused a sinus infection, too. He yelped in pain when he tried to eat his food, so I knew something was wrong.

Your vet's price doesn't seem bad at all. I had to get a panel of tests done to see if my dog could take the anesthesia, and then the procedure, and a charge for two extractions and some antibiotics and some antibiotic cream to smear on his gums..etc. etc.

Ended up being almost $400 bucks...now I'm brushing his teeth every other day with dog tooth paste and a soft small toothbrush to improve his mouth hygiene. He's a dog that won't chew bones or raw hide so he gets a lot of tarter...Vet said older dogs, like people, can sometimes start getting more health problems..makes sense to me...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2008, 07:23 PM
 
7,081 posts, read 24,174,349 times
Reputation: 3634
Aside from the danger of abscessed teeth and development of oro-nasal fistulae (abnormal openings between the nose and mouth - my rescue chihuahua has this) the problem with dental plaque is that it harbors TONS of bacteria. These bacteria, as in people, can lead to endocarditis, a potentially fatal infection of the lining of the heart. It's important to ensure that the dog's mouth is kept as free from plaque as possible!

Bottom line: this is NOT bogus.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2008, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,310 posts, read 21,032,096 times
Reputation: 6648
Quote:
Originally Posted by phxgirl1009 View Post
Hello, I am hoping someone can help me here...yesterday, I took my two dogs (both almost 9yrs old, one is a cocker spaniel mix and the other is a schnauzer mix) for routine vaccinations at Banfield Hospital (inside Petsmart).

While examining both of them, he strongly expressed concerns about their teeth, and told me that I need to get them cleaned. He quoted me $189 per dog (although I am sure there are additional hidden fees in there) for a teeth cleaning.

I am trying to figure out if this is really necessary or if it's just totally bogus. I recently moved to the Dallas/Fort Worth area from Phoenix, where we had a wonderful vet at Blue Cross Vet Clinic. If anyone has any suggestions about a good, ethical vet in the DFW area, or thoughts on teeth cleaning, that would be very helpful.

I'd like to add that I have visited Banfield in the past (prior to finding Blue Cross Vet), and the staff tried to upsell me on the Banfield Wellness Plans the entire time. I actually fell for this with the first dog, and ended up spending around $500 on "services" they convinced me that she needed, and there were multiple additional fees at the end of the visit that I was unaware they were charging. As for last night, unfortunately, Banfield still happens to be the most convenient, as far as their location and hours of operation, and the dogs HAD to have these vaccinations before I can board them during Christmas. And the staff here also continued to push their Welllness Plans...that said, I definitely want to find a reputable vet here in the DFW area.
I sound like a broken record. Try giving your dogs raw turkey necks a couple of times a week. It will do wonders keeping the teeth clean.

On the plus side, $189 is definitely on the cheap end of the spectrum for doggie tooth cleaning.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2008, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
6,734 posts, read 8,720,796 times
Reputation: 8732
I had a Yorkie that was diagnosed with cancer several years ago. She was going to have her teeth cleaned at that time, but we put it off until after the cancer surgery. Well, then the doc said she probably wouldn't live to the end of the year, so I decided to skip the teeth cleaning.

Big mistake. She lived, I think, another 7-8 years! (The vet clinic called her their "miracle dog".) Her teeth started getting bad, but I kept thinking, "no, she can't live more than a few more months." Before her death she had lost most of her teeth. She had to be on wet food only for the last year or so of her life. I felt really guilty. Poor girl.

Dogs do need their teeth cleaned.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2008, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Jax
8,204 posts, read 23,492,940 times
Reputation: 3177
I'm a believer in getting teeth cleanings for the dogs. Their teeth really do get a good cleaning (and fresh breath! ). I wish I could do it more often, but it's kind of an ordeal so they don't get it every year. We plan to have my 8 year old and my 3 year old's teeth done this January or February (my vet usually runs a $75 special then ).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2009, 07:39 PM
 
1,332 posts, read 3,297,724 times
Reputation: 741
Can't my vet determine if my dogs teeth need cleaning when he does their annual check-up?

They're not fed canned food, have 2 milk-bones every night as a treat and have no indication of gum or tooth problems.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2009, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Land of 10000 Lakes +
5,555 posts, read 4,089,025 times
Reputation: 8520
Yes, he can determine that at the annual checkup.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2009, 07:57 PM
 
1,332 posts, read 3,297,724 times
Reputation: 741
Thanks Aylalou,
I trust my vet completely. He's a saint. Guess he'll tell me if & when their normal diet isn't working to keep their teeth healthy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top