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Old 12-20-2008, 07:31 PM
 
11 posts, read 163,862 times
Reputation: 14
Red face Are goldendoodles worth the $?

Ok please please I couldn't care less about showing dogs or what makes mongrels so pure breed snobs find another forum. I'm thinking of getting a dog and love the look of mini goldendoodles but they are expensive!!!! Especially the english ones, is there really a difference? I want an easy to train good smaller sized family dog, and they appear to be the cutest thing ever! (it's this or a schnauzer ) thoughts?
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Old 12-20-2008, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Tejas
6,920 posts, read 10,543,250 times
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If you dont care about showing dogs or pure breed snobs or "ppre breed snobs"? I would say no, not worth the money. I am sure you can find a X dog of the same blood for $50 in the pound somewhere,
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Old 12-20-2008, 07:42 PM
 
3,353 posts, read 1,531,836 times
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Try petfinder - you should be able to find one to adopt much cheaper and that way you won't be supporting unscrupulous breeders, plus you'll help a dog find a home!

Pet adoption: Want a dog or cat? Adopt a pet on Petfinder
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Old 12-20-2008, 07:54 PM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
12,992 posts, read 21,778,067 times
Reputation: 10143
Only YOU can determine if a mini goldendoodle is worth the money. If you can afford to buy one AND it tickles your fancy like no other dog does, then what's the harm? Speaking for myself, they aren't worth it to me. I'm a big fan of a shelter dog for under $100. I'd rather save the money and spend it on other things. But if owning a mini goldendoodle makes you happy, then go for it.

For instance, I buy, sell and collect antiques. There is no set value on any antique. And the value is really determined on a case by case situation of a willing seller and a willing buyer coming to terms in a transaction. Some things in my collection I've bought really cheap relative to what they sell for on average in the marketplace. But other items, I've paid a lot more for than the going rate. And when my mom comes to visit, she doesn't see anything special in what I collect, she just worries things getting stolen or the fragile items getting broken, or if I tell her something is really valuable, she wants me to sell it and have the cash instead. But you see, everyone's value scale is vastly different.
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Old 12-20-2008, 08:22 PM
c99
 
Location: Under the sun
237 posts, read 637,459 times
Reputation: 175
My SIL bought a golden retriever / poodle mix (yes, coined goldendoodle by puppymills) even after we educated both she and my BIL about the benefits of pound or other rescue dogs. She was convinced that that non-breed "breed" was right for them due to the non-shedding factor. Her expensive golden / poodle mix may not shed, but they have spent A LOT of money on vet bills. I don't remember the laundry list of health problems the dog has had in its short just over a year life, but it has cost them a lot of money. The latest problem is his ears. A severe ear infection and I don't remember what else cost over $300 for one visit. This condition may require surgery. Not sure if such health problems are typical of golden/poodle mixes or not.

There are so many great pound dogs and (unfortunately) there will likely be a lot more after the 'holiday dump.' You could also try contacting your local rescue. The benefit from adopting from a rescue is that the dog is staying in someone's house and the foster parent should have a good handle on temperament, leash walking, house training, etc.

My 'not so short answer' is that, no, I don't think a golden/poodle mix/mutt or whatever you want to call it is worth the money that some backyard breeder is charging. If you have the funds to adopt the expensive mix breed, but decide to go the shelter route what about donating the difference to a shelter, sponsoring a dog that you cannot take home so it can perhaps live longer or receive medical treatment, or even donating some food/blankets other needed supplies to your local shelter or rescue? I am sure they would be very appreciative.

Best of luck to you.
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Old 12-20-2008, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
1,315 posts, read 4,501,906 times
Reputation: 1502
Quote:
Originally Posted by c99 View Post
... Her expensive golden / poodle mix may not shed, but they have spent A LOT of money on vet bills. I don't remember the laundry list of health problems the dog has had in its short just over a year life, but it has cost them a lot of money. The latest problem is his ears. A severe ear infection and I don't remember what else cost over $300 for one visit. This condition may require surgery. Not sure if such health problems are typical of golden/poodle mixes or not...
Ear problems are very common in dogs with floppy ears, particularly when the dog has a dense and/or curly coat.

The other thing to consider about goldendoodles and other poodle mixes is the health issues that you mention. Poorly bred poodles, which includes those used by "breeders" who breed the "doodles" are very prone to hereditary health problems. Hybrid dogs inherit half of their genetic complement from each parent, so buying a hybrid doesn't guarantee a healthy dog, despite the claims of "hybrid vigor" that many breeders tout.

If you want a dog that will have a good chance of living a long and healthy life, get a true mutt, or buy a purebred pup from a reliable, professional breeder who is affiliated with a national breed club. Do your research, too. Some breeds are prone to problems, so choose accordingly.
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Old 12-21-2008, 01:36 AM
 
11 posts, read 163,862 times
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What makes a true mutt? So are there any other major problems besides the ears? Is there anything 2 help prevent ear problems? Also, does anyone know if the whole "english" or "teddybear" thing is just a ploy 2 charge more?
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Old 12-21-2008, 01:37 AM
 
11 posts, read 163,862 times
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one more thing, I'm thinking of moving to Seattle, how do these dogs with all that fur do in the rain?
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Old 12-21-2008, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Beautiful place in Virginia
2,620 posts, read 7,398,202 times
Reputation: 1121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgshawaii View Post
Ok please please I couldn't care less about showing dogs or what makes mongrels so pure breed snobs find another forum. I'm thinking of getting a dog and love the look of mini goldendoodles but they are expensive!!!! Especially the english ones, is there really a difference? I want an easy to train good smaller sized family dog, and they appear to be the cutest thing ever! (it's this or a schnauzer ) thoughts?
I don't know what your selection criteria is. Cute is a relative and highly subjective criteria.

What you should consider are the following:
Allergies
Exercise requirements
Compatibility with children
Your housing arrangements: Fenced/Unfenced yard,House/Condo/TH,etc
Your budget for purchase and ownership
Grooming requirements (non-shedders require more involved grooming)
Time considerations: Your work schedule,travel
If you consider a hybrid, what generative type:

Generations

If you want a small dog that is easy to train, there are many out there. Most dogs are intelligent and are easy to train - some are more aggressive, have tendencies to bark/dig, some have more separation anxiety, some are harder to potty train, some drool, some shed, etc.

I would suggest looking at the criteria based upon your lifestyle.

Find the Perfect Dog, Dog Search, Dogs broken down into Search Categories, Which Breed is right for you, Breed Search

I have a Bichon which is a loveable lapdog. He will just sit right next to you and rest his head on your lap or lay down at your feet. They are very smart and don't shed.

There are a few books to consider reading:

Amazon.com: A Member of the Family: Cesar Millan's Guide to a Lifetime of Fulfillment with Your Dog: Cesar Millan, Melissa Jo Peltier: Books

Amazon.com: New Dog: Choosing Wisely and Ensuring a Happily Ever After: Bruce Fogle, Patricia Holden White: Books

Amazon.com: Paws to Consider: Choosing the Right Dog for You and Your Family: Brian Kilcommons, Sarah Wilson: Books

Lastly, there are many dogs that are euthanized due to overpopulation and you can save a dog's life by considering a rescue organization specific to a breed (which I prefer) or an animal shelter. Rescues can be older which have larger bladder capacities which in theory can be easier to housetrain.

www.petfinder.com
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Old 12-21-2008, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Indiana
591 posts, read 911,756 times
Reputation: 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgshawaii View Post
Ok please please I couldn't care less about showing dogs or what makes mongrels so pure breed snobs find another forum. I'm thinking of getting a dog and love the look of mini goldendoodles but they are expensive!!!! Especially the english ones, is there really a difference? I want an easy to train good smaller sized family dog, and they appear to be the cutest thing ever! (it's this or a schnauzer ) thoughts?
They almost answered your question lol..I've never had a goldendoodle so I can't really answer from personal experience but I know those that have them really love them. I would suggest finding a breeder that has run the proper tests on each dog to minimize health issues. The one thing i'd be concerned with getting the smaller one is when people try to make a breed that is meant to be large become a smaller breed you can run into alot of health issues. I'd honestly go for the schnauzer. They are intelligent fun loving dogs if it were me. Either way good luck and make sure to let us know when you decide and post some pics if you get one.
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