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Old 06-19-2009, 04:52 AM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,492 posts, read 6,481,772 times
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Dear Dashdog;

Good inputs. Do you know of a list of health issues by breed that might be publishable?
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Old 06-19-2009, 04:57 AM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,492 posts, read 6,481,772 times
Reputation: 10932
Default Clarification check...

Thanks, Granny. Just a couple of questions:

Quote:
Originally Posted by grannynancy View Post
I think there should be limits on how many litters a male can sire.
Is there a body of knowledge about disipating viability over the number of sires? I don't know anything about this issue; it's the first I've heard, but I am NOT versed in canine breeding.

Also:
Quote:
Originally Posted by grannynancy View Post
There is also a lot of trickery - testicle implants, making ears stand that won't naturally, color tricks [e.g., potassium permanganate], dental work, selective trimming, etc.
Are these issues breed specific. Should they be mentioned as a sub-category in breeder criteria?

Thanks again, for the info.
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Old 06-19-2009, 05:03 AM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,492 posts, read 6,481,772 times
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Thanks for the news on Denver, BlueWillow, regardless that it is off-topic, I am personally glad to read about Denver's decisions (which validate my own opinions).

And, just FYI, I never intended this to be ONLY about pure breeds, though it does appear that the general opinion is that responsible breeders breed pure, it isn't an opinion I share.
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Old 06-19-2009, 05:07 AM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,492 posts, read 6,481,772 times
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Sorry, Granny, not to be picky, but I want to understand this comment, better:
Quote:
Originally Posted by grannynancy View Post
I really think the market limits breeding for the good dogs. I don't know you can regulate it as much as for the breeders to work to make sure their dogs really do wind up in the right homes. I don't know the answer other than really subsidizing spay nueter programs.
In what way do you believe the market limits breeding? What do responsible breeders do with their pups that they cannot place? Or, is that what you mean by the spay/neuter programs?

Thanks for all the good info, not just to Granny, but to everyone that has participated in this topic.
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Old 06-19-2009, 05:08 AM
 
4,133 posts, read 13,321,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
Dear Dashdog;

Good inputs. Do you know of a list of health issues by breed that might be publishable?
Not Dashdog but here's a couple

http://www.dogpack.com/breeds/dogBreedsA.html

http://www.dogplay.com/Breeding/health.html
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Old 06-19-2009, 05:09 AM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,492 posts, read 6,481,772 times
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Dear Leorah;

I've come to think of you as the final word in any pet topic. Your words are always straight, and from the heart. Thank you for being there for all of us.
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Old 06-19-2009, 06:33 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,933,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post

And, just FYI, I never intended this to be ONLY about pure breeds, though it does appear that the general opinion is that responsible breeders breed pure, it isn't an opinion I share.
Thanks for the clarification.

I guess I am of the opinion that a responsible breeder loves the breed itself, but this is not to say that the American Kennel Club or other such entities are the final arbiter of whether or not to breed.
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Old 06-19-2009, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Mississippi
315 posts, read 980,272 times
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I breed, and with a total disregard for the American Kennel Club. Their breed clubs have an understanding of genetics that apparently stopped right after WW I and Eugenics. For working breeds, the worst thing I have seen happen is they are accepted into the AKC and their abominations they call shows. Once a breed has split into working and show lines, the breed is in decline. I already had Great Danes when I began work on my Biology degree and realized there was something intrinsically wrong with the way the breed is actually split by the AKC into 4 different sub-breeds by color. By the time I finished my Masters I understood it was because breeders are terrified of high-demand Harlequin dogs returning to being the genetic rarity they otherwise are- hurting the bottom line. Never mind that about half of Danes have congenital problems- they die young anyway.
The AKC is made up in large part by people whose livelihood depends on puppy sales, not by those dedicated to the welfare of the dogs.The only thing the AKC truly promotes is its own continued existence.
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Old 06-19-2009, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 34,427,038 times
Reputation: 7085
Quote:
Originally Posted by yodi View Post
Good point but as of now there is also a surplus of working dogs. We have a blue heeler that we got through a rescue program. He was definitely bred to work but ended up abandoned, rescued and now lives with us in the city. There are lots of dogs who were bred for work that are sitting in shelters and foster homes waiting for someone to take them home. Our heeler is a pet but he is ridiculously smart and his instincts to drive cattle are there. He'd do great on a farm. Maybe a solution would be to limit breeding?
Blueheelers and other cattle dogs get a lot of that. They are handsome animals and very clever but they aren't always (if ever) well suited to urban existence. A lot of people will get a puppy because "they just love blueheelers" without ever having the slightest inkling of what the dog actually is (a running and nipping machine), realize that they have a lot more dog than they can handle, decide that this dog is particularly incorrigible (he's not, he's actually "a blueheeler") and mr. bottomless pit of undirected energy is put up for adoption or destruction.

To me, that's more a problem stemming from ignorant demand for an innapropriate pet than from people who try to perpetuate and improve the Australian Cowherd.

On the other hand, the breeder who provided my golden never would have put him in a home where he would not be trained, would not hunt or would not "do what he was born to do." He would most certainly have found his way to the SPCA or worse (very high energy, independent streak, much more strong willed than the stereotypical understanding of golden retrievers). In that respect, someone who puts a high octane working dog in an unsuspecting home is being irresponsible, but someone who can breed a high octane working dog probably isn't going to do that. I would be pretty wary of a breeder who would.
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Old 06-19-2009, 09:58 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,254 times
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Out of an estimated 6 to 8 million cats and dogs that enter shelters every year, 3 to 4 million are euthanized. Most of these are healthy animals or animals that have treatable health issues. Anyone who would purposely breed more pets while MILLIONS of innocent animals are being euthanized is absolutely irresponsible.

If you must get a "purebred" pet, please look on petfinder.com for a rescued animal from one of the many breed rescue organizations that exist in the US. Remember, "purebred" pets have tons of congenital health problems and predispositions for diseases -- from back problems in dachshunds to cancer in boxers and respiratory problems in bulldogs. Breeding is done only for a misplaced sense of self-worth (and money) for the breeders. It does the animals no favors. They don't care if they have legs of a certain length or the appropriate head shape. All they care about is having a home and being loved.
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