U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-13-2009, 12:37 PM
 
269 posts, read 950,422 times
Reputation: 75

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by dogcrazy View Post
I wish i could take him.I just have the biggest place in my heart for this breed!Cant take them all though!I feel better that i help them and make their time at the shelter a good one!Most of them come in abused and never knew what love is like!And lately weve been getting a lot of emaciated ones in! Its VERY sad.Theres just not enough good people for these dogs.
Don't forget that you can always foster a pit and see how they do with your dogs. It's hard for me to imagine having 5+ large dogs, so I can't say how they would do. My dogs (rottweiler and boxer) used to play with a bunch of pit bulls and some of their favorite dogs are pit mixes. I know someone who has three pits - one female and two males. While it really depends on the dog's temperament, I've read that two female bully breeds aren't recommended (perhaps they have been bred to be more alpha). This is true for bulldogs, boxers, etc.

Some dogs are better guard dogs than others because of how they were bred. Pitbulls have actually been bred to never be aggressive with humans so the idea that they make good guard dogs is crazy. They were bred to be dog aggressive but at the same time, evolution has encouraged most dogs to be naturally submissive so it's really a give and take situation. So really pits have been bred to listen so well, to fight with other dogs on command, even if they don't want to. This is just my opinion but if some fight dogs can be rescued and live with other dogs, any pit can most likely be trained to behave around other dogs.

People seem to be on a "you must be the alpha" kick on this thread. Remember, you should never physically dominate or make your dogs afraid of you (that's awful and can encourage fear aggression) to be the leader. Good leaders are benevolent and fair but also set boundaries and rules. Good leaders don't need to force people to follow, people (dogs) just naturally follow. I'm 4'10, 100 lbs but have my 85 lbs rott and 50lbs boxer under my control without ever yelling or laying a hand on them. Just as an fyi - NILIF is usually enough to be a good leader.

Anyway, if you decide to bring a new dog into your home - make sure you take the time to do proper introductions (baby gates are you best friends) and if you are fearful, you can always keep dogs separated. Since you have dogs already, the best thing to do is adopt a dog that has already lived with other dogs in foster care.

Good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-02-2009, 01:15 PM
 
Location: NJ
24,027 posts, read 30,136,737 times
Reputation: 15917
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc76 View Post
How does your Aussie do at the park? I have noticed that shepherd breeds tend to cause some issues at the park. I've seen several of them harass and nip and try to herd dogs until the dog can't take it anymore and snaps at them. The shepherd isn't doing anything malicious, it is just following its instinct.
i went to the dog park the other day with my aussie. she is always trying to control movement. all the dogs she tries to keep them in line and will give them a bark or a little snap to try to control them. it doesnt lead to anything but i can see how its annoying to some dogs. i am always trying to throw balls for other dogs so she can chase the dogs. she doesnt care about the ball.

there was a boxer that was there for the first time. she didnt appreciate my dog trying to control her. she ended up standing on top of my dog while my dog was lying down. she growled and acted threatening when my dog would move, just putting her in her place. the owner eventually took the dog away and kept the dog to the side. the boxer was easily worked up and made me a little nervous when i was holding a ball at one point. if the boxer was mine, i would have pulled her off quicker but it went fine. right as i was leaving, a couple with an american bulldog pulled up. that dog looked like a beast, im glad we were leaving. boxers are good for my dog to chase because they have the energy to run, and the strength to not get stopped by my dog. my dog will jump on them or get in their way when she catches them (which usually happens pretty fast). a boxer can be strong enough to run through it. they also can be too aggressive sometimes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2009, 01:35 PM
 
Location: "The Sunshine State"
4,334 posts, read 12,205,164 times
Reputation: 3010
Any dog with agression issues needs to be constantly socialized and needs a responsible owner at hand.
I have heard and seen many problems at dog parks due to irresponsiblility on the owners behalf!
Remember, it is never the dogs fault!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2009, 01:47 PM
 
Location: NJ
24,027 posts, read 30,136,737 times
Reputation: 15917
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondie621 View Post
Any dog with agression issues needs to be constantly socialized and needs a responsible owner at hand.
I have heard and seen many problems at dog parks due to irresponsiblility on the owners behalf!
Remember, it is never the dogs fault!
its definitely the owners fault because if the dog doesnt belong there, they shouldnt take them there. the first couple times i have been there, i have seen some minor scuffles. i really havent seen anything since.

i set it up so i am all the way on the opposite side of the area from my dog. then i call her to run top speed towards me. i set it up so my wife on the bench can have a great view. i wish she had videotaped it. i love watching her run at full speed. i run away from her but its like im standing still.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-20-2009, 12:49 PM
 
Location: phoenix az
124 posts, read 219,286 times
Reputation: 44
No issues here It is complicated thing to do. You have to know your dogs and be the ring leader for a little while they have to decide who is the big dog when you are not there. I personally believe if you have an alfa dog already .leave it alone. My two female cattle dogs are pretty slick and were fine introducing an alfa male . They have free rome in and out the dog door even when I am gone . Of coarse there is only one dominant breed at work in my situation. That is what I would consider in your case . If you get two alfa s or two stubborn breeds it could very well be clash of the titans. Good luck I didnt read every single post I could be re iterating what others have said ..


pitbulls in a multi dog household-100_1584.jpg
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-20-2009, 12:58 PM
 
Location: phoenix az
124 posts, read 219,286 times
Reputation: 44
Default Agreed

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondie621 View Post
Any dog with agression issues needs to be constantly socialized and needs a responsible owner at hand.
I have heard and seen many problems at dog parks due to irresponsiblility on the owners behalf!
Remember, it is never the dogs fault!
I have a very gentle dog but when I go to the dog park. He cannot will not tolerate mounting , face snipping and alpha behavior . I cannot control them so I keep my alpha on a lead 99 % he is good. Then comes the 1 alpha to challenge. I am getting a muzzle just in case . Not for them so I dont get sued .My dog will win / unfortunately he has dropped the two big males that mounted him. NO HARM , NO FOUL . I can blame the others but he is my responsibility. Plus it is traumatic for a some housewife with an outta control mastiff or rott to see him get slammed on his back. even if its there fault
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-20-2009, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Mountains of middle TN
5,242 posts, read 13,990,077 times
Reputation: 6062
Not sure how I missed this earlier.

To those that argued and wanted to insist that there are some breeds - pits among them - that are more dangerous, you've just bought into media hype. Congratulations. Now go do some homework youself instead of being lazy and just listening to what the news wants to pump into your brain.

Right now I have 2 shepherds, a lab, a very old poodle, 6 chihuahuas, a rat terrier, a mini doxie, a corgi bassett mix all living incredibly happily in a home with 3 pure bred pits and 2 pit mixes. Not a single fight.

Viscious dogs? No. Dogs that need training, yes, as all dogs do. Please don't go pinning traits to dogs without doing your homework. Yes, they can be aggressive if they've not been properly trained and socialized. So can poodles, chihuahuas, cocker spaniels, etc.

Any why aren't they used in rescue and therapy? They are. Again, go do your homework. I've got a binder that I take with me when I speak at community meetings and other events that has a huge list of the pits that have been used in therapy work in hospitals, nursing homes, day care centers, as well as police work, search and rescue work, etc.

And among that list ^ is a large number of rottweilers, dobies, shepherds, etc working right along beside them. Know what they have in common? An owner / handler that was responsible and properly trained and socialized their dog.

Pits do not need a job. Personally I think most dogs are happier with a job, but no, I don't think every dog needs a job. I've got a female pittie here now that's a major couch potato. If you tried to turn her into a working dog I dont think she'd be as happy. All she needs to be happy is a family that she can be with. Just to sleep at your feet and she's in heaven.

Pits are definitely one of the sweetest breeds I've come across in 15 years of working with dogs. They are usually the most affectionate and outgoing in any kennel. Go take a trip yourself and see. I've had more problems with rat terriers than pitbulls.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-20-2009, 04:51 PM
 
603 posts, read 1,753,603 times
Reputation: 544
mrs1885, you always make me feel more comfortable and reassured.I second guess my belief that they can do well with multiple pets just like any other breed can,when i read things on pitbull rescue websites.Most of them basically say dog aggression is expected or it WILL happen.They say pitbulls mature slowly and show their true colors towards other animals when they are around 2-3 years old.I have a pitbull that i adopted when she was 8 weeks.She lives with 11 other dogs from chihuahua to st bernard,shes fine 99% of the time.I just dont let them play too rough because then im asking for trouble.I believe most dogs get like that though.When they get too worked up i simply make them calm down,never had any issues.Most of my guys get crated when im not home.Some are crated because they think furniture is a **** post,others because i do not want to take a chance of a fight.My pit is ALWAYS crated when im not home.Shes in her crate in my bedroom and the other guys are crated in the living room.

Pit/pit mixes take up about 60% of our shelter and i am totally honest when i tell you i RARELY have an issue with them.Many of them do not like other animals but they ALWAYS love us humans.How?I dont know.Most of them were abused bred or faught.I have more issues with labs and smaller breeds.But everyone always wants them.I give you a LOT of credit for what you do.you do a lot more than many rescues.We work with quite a few here and im grateful they take dogs from us but if its not under 30lbs and fluffy they dont take them.I feel they should take the older ones that people dont want,the ones with some medical issues.While i think its great that they take puppies from down south,we have SO many in shelters here that need rescuing.It would be a dream come true for me if i could have my own rescue one day.But i know thats just a dream.

Again,thank you for doing what you do for these animals.Especially the ones who need the most help,pitbulls.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-20-2009, 09:45 PM
 
Location: DFW, Texas
2 posts, read 7,267 times
Reputation: 12
This is an interesting thread to me because of what I'm hearing from those who are not pit owners.

I naively rescued an AmStaff at 6 months of age (at the time, I had no clue what an "AmStaff" was! ). I was told that he was a bulldog/boxer mix, was suspicious that he had some pit in him, but was reassured that this wasn't the case. (Later I found out this is common practice to mislabel pits to get them adopted out.) Anyway, I must admit that I had never been around pits and because of the media's coverage of them, I never, never would have sought to bring one home.

I quickly realized the true identity of this dog and we enrolled in the PS obedience courses (beginner thru advanced)--it helped me give him structure, socialization in a controlled setting, and a "job." I took him everywhere with me and hit up the dog parks. He is so laid-back and mellow (as other posters have said) that even when other dogs have nipped at him over a ball, he doesn't react and is very nonchalant. He is quiet, sensible, and plainly well-adjusted.

Fast-forward one year and we just tested to become a licensed therapy dog team. This dog is a rockstar visiting in convalescent homes, where folks can be very unpredictable and pull at his ears or tail. He's around other therapy dogs and he does fabulous.

To boot, I have a 4 yo male and unneutered Doberman that I brought him home to. No problems---they sleep together on the same cushion and will even share a doghouse if I leave them outside. They're buddies.

This dog has changed my whole perception of pits. I love them. But I would recommend an owner that is experienced and responsible, and one that uses discretion if bringing one home to a pack. Kudos to the OP for exercising such judgment.

And yes, we pit owners have a much higher stress level in owning these dogs and taking them out into the public. We know that public perception has zero tolerance for anything less than good behaviour.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2009, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Mountains of middle TN
5,242 posts, read 13,990,077 times
Reputation: 6062
Don't get me wrong; if you bring one home you'd better know something about dog training / socialization. If not you'd better be ready to learn fast. But I'd say that of any breed, especially the larger ones. Not because they're more likely to fight, but because if they do you are less likely to be able to stop it before serious damage occurs.

I just had my 'pack' out back playing ball. Took some photos. Outside while these pictures were taken:

Diva, female pitbull about 3 years old, spayed
Liza, female pitbull about 4 - 5 years old, unspayed (appt late this month)
Randy, male pitbull about 5 months old, neutered
Trixie, female pitbull mix about 2 years old, unspayed (appt with Liza later this month)
Star, female pitbull mix about 1 year old, spayed
Cooper, male lab about a year old, neutered
Duval, male rat terrier about 6 years old, neutered
Buffy, female poodle about 10-12 years old, unspayed (spay pending vet approval, been denied so far.... grrrr....)
Lucky, male mini doxie about 5 years old, neutered
Honey, female corgi / bassett mix about 4 - 5 years old, unspayed (makes the trip with the other girls)
Angus, male terrier / chi mix about 3 years old, neutered
Munchi, female long haired chi about 18 months old, unspayed (again, trip with the girls)
Butch, male chi about 8 years old, neutered
Belled, female chi about 7 years old, spayed
Princess, female chi about 6 years old, spayed
Copper, male chi about 2 years old, neutered

16 dogs, one yard, all playing ball. The only 2 dogs we didn't have out is the female 8 year old shepherd who's going through the slow treatment for heartworms so we try to keep her calm and the 12 year old male shepherd who's pretty much a forever foster. He's got a good bit of medical problems and he's neurotic as hell!! LOL

In that mix of 16 dogs is 5 pits / pit mixes. I didn't have a single fight. Haven't had a single fight. They get along very well with nearly 30% of the dogs being pits.

So, do pits mean you can't have more than just them? Does it mean you can't have more than a couple? By no means. It means you need to either have a trainer or know enough about their behavior and how to properly raise them yourself. But if you do, there's no reason you can't have a happy pack of dogs.







Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:52 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top