U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 03-17-2010, 08:45 AM
 
3,593 posts, read 10,677,383 times
Reputation: 5207

Advertisements

Found out yesterday that my Chessie, Mariah has torn her ACL in her right rear leg. My vet has recommended the TPLO procedure and I was wondering if anyone here has had this done on their large breed dog and if the results were as expected.

The poor girl is totally lame right now and on pain and inflammation meds to maintain her while we get her surgery set up. I'm a bit worried about her recupperation and the initial post op period. I unfortunately suffer from a very bad back and am worried about how much I will need to assist her in standing and walking right after surgery. Trying to keep a very high energy, high pain tolerance Chessie quiet while she heals is also going to be a pretty large order. Can anyone share their experiences with this procedure for a 80+ lb dog?

Thanks!
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-17-2010, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Eastern NC
19,503 posts, read 17,745,163 times
Reputation: 17301
My Siberian Husky tore hers in February. She had the surgery to fix it, not TPLO and I had to help her for 2 days. The first night was the worst, she could barely stand up. by the next day, she was doing better and has improved with each and every day. Its been 2 months now and although she still favors her leg sometimes, I have seen her put all her weight on it with no problem. We had hers done at our local vet however if we had gone to the othorpedic specialist, they would have kept her for 3 days. You may wish to see how long they would keep your dog. I have heard bad things about TPLO, do some research but by all means get that fixed and good luck.

Last edited by trlhiker; 03-17-2010 at 05:13 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2010, 07:10 PM
 
Location: San Diego
5,027 posts, read 13,408,296 times
Reputation: 4848
Are you positive that it's the ACL? My Bulldog was limping for a couple of days, and one of the not too bright vets immediately said it was his ACL. I called my breeder, who saw him, and he said it appears that he just landed wrong from a jump. Sure enough, after 3 days of limping, he was back to his normal self. Vets are quick to misdiagnose and I would hate for your pup to go through such a surgery unless absolutely necessary!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2010, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Living on 10 acres in Oklahoma
1,188 posts, read 4,961,047 times
Reputation: 1191
Be sure to search CD for the TPLO and TTA procedures...there have been several conversations about these that I think you may find helpful. My 58lb border collie had TTA on her rear acl. But, I researched both so feel free to look for my posts and ask me anything.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 09:42 AM
 
3,593 posts, read 10,677,383 times
Reputation: 5207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amazonchix View Post
Be sure to search CD for the TPLO and TTA procedures...there have been several conversations about these that I think you may find helpful. My 58lb border collie had TTA on her rear acl. But, I researched both so feel free to look for my posts and ask me anything.
All I've been doing is reading up on the different procedures. There are so many conflicting feeling and reports that I wanted to see if I could get some 1st hand input. Its definately her ACL. I've gone through it before with a foster dog but he didn't have a tear that was bad enough to warrant surgical intervention. Unfortunately with Mariah, you can actually see the instability of the joint when she moves. X-rays also show the classic diffused edema that is associated with a torn ACL. I think I may take her to a specialist for another assessment before proceeding. She is resting comfortably with limited exercise and anti-inflammatory/pain meds. Thank you everyone!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 01:16 PM
 
5,065 posts, read 13,744,734 times
Reputation: 3522
I'm so sorry to hear about Mariah. That happened to one of our 50+ lb. border collies, there was no doubt about the tear. He was in bad shape and could not walk at all, and x-rays proved it. The surgery was expensive, around $2000.00, but vet prices are really high in my area. The incision was enormous, down the whole side of his leg. After he woke up from his surgery, the vet said our dog was the first they'd ever had that had immediately try to get up and walk after an ACL operation. That dog was like that, he never felt pain, nothing would stop him. He recovered very nicely, I did have to keep him on a leash for several weeks when going out. (very hard to do with an energetic border collie!)

The bad news is, several months later he tore the other rear ACL, so our dog had to undergo a second surgery. The vet told me that is not uncommon. However, after both surgeries he made a full recovery and went back to running laps at a breakneck speed all day long. Hopefully Mariah will recover easily, too.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 08:41 PM
 
3,593 posts, read 10,677,383 times
Reputation: 5207
Quote:
Originally Posted by andthentherewere3 View Post
I'm so sorry to hear about Mariah. That happened to one of our 50+ lb. border collies, there was no doubt about the tear. He was in bad shape and could not walk at all, and x-rays proved it. The surgery was expensive, around $2000.00, but vet prices are really high in my area. The incision was enormous, down the whole side of his leg. After he woke up from his surgery, the vet said our dog was the first they'd ever had that had immediately try to get up and walk after an ACL operation. That dog was like that, he never felt pain, nothing would stop him. He recovered very nicely, I did have to keep him on a leash for several weeks when going out. (very hard to do with an energetic border collie!)

The bad news is, several months later he tore the other rear ACL, so our dog had to undergo a second surgery. The vet told me that is not uncommon. However, after both surgeries he made a full recovery and went back to running laps at a breakneck speed all day long. Hopefully Mariah will recover easily, too.
Thanks for sharing your story. Do you know which type of procedure he had done?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2010, 05:59 AM
 
5,065 posts, read 13,744,734 times
Reputation: 3522
I can't remember the name of the procedure. I just remember they replaced the torn ligament with another "part" of him, some kind of nearby tissue.

I just quickly researched the surgical options, and couldn't find the name for what surgery he had. However, I don't think it was TPLO, as his surgery was done differently without screws or plates. From what I read, the TPLO method has "excellent results" which is comforting for you to know. My dog had his surgeries 4-5 years ago, so I'm sure there are probably more advanced techniques more commonly performed now, like the TPLO.

I just want to warn you ahead of time, if your dog has the long incision that mine did, the sight of it is very distressing, at least it was to me. It was literally down the entire length of his leg. But as I said previously, my crazy dog was never bothered by pain, and seemed more annoyed with his confinement and inability to get around quickly. But I think dogs recover from injuries/surgeries more quickly than humans do, I'm sure your dog will be fine!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2010, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Living on 10 acres in Oklahoma
1,188 posts, read 4,961,047 times
Reputation: 1191
In our experience, our 58 lb Border Collie Pearl had repeat injuries to her left rear leg. We were told that she had just strained her muscle by our vet at least 3x's and given Deramaxx to help bring down the swelling. We'd thought we would get her healed up and then bam, again she would reinjury it again and again. Finally, we were very frustrated with our situation that had been going on for 10 months. We were also very frustrated with our vet because we believed more was going on then a strained muscle. Pearl, prior to her injuries, was running up to six miles with me with ease. Even at her worst with the injury, Pearl could still walk on her leg, but any running, jogging, cuts or jumps was out of the question for her.

As a last resort, we asked a personal friend who is a vet to please come to our home and personally examine Pearl. (Trust me, our friend would be our persoanl vet BUT his speciality now is only quality, high volume spay/neuters. Our friend had his own general practice for 20+ years prior to specializing in s/n. He is also the person who caught Pearl's hypothryoidism when our vet missed that several times.) Our friend came over and examined Pearl and within 10 minutes assured us she had a torn acl! He said you need a vet who is confident in their manipulation skills to manipulate the joint to test for too much laxity.

We scheduled an appointment with a surgery specialist in our area. During our consult the surgeon again mainpulated the joint to test for laxity. He too told us she had a torn acl. The surgeon assured us that if during surgery he found that Pearl didn't have a torn acl, he would not charge us for anything. Long story short, we opted for the TTA procedure over TPLO because we felt it was the least invasive procedure and would have our dog back to her active life the fastest and safest in our opinions. There was only about $250 difference between TPLO and the TTA procedures.

After surgery we were told Pearl had a 80% tear of her acl. Needless to say, we haven't returned to our vet who missed this for 10 months. This was his second major miss with Pearl. He also missed her hypothyroidism which caused her to gain the weight that ended up compromising her acl and contributed to the acl tearing. We never needed x-rays prior to the TTA surgery. You can't see muscles or tendons on an x-ray, but you can see arthritic like changes caused by an injury. Our surgeon took x-rays of Pearl's knee when she was sedated going into surgery as a baseline x-ray to compare the post surgery cuts made to her bone for the acl repair to determine her healing status. Also, these x-rays were imperative to determine the angles for the TTA surgery. In order to proceed with the TTA option, only certain knee angles qualify for the surgery. If Pearl's angles were too off for TTA, our back up plan was to proceed with TPLO. Our surgery was $3000 for everything (pre visits, post visits and rx's).

Please ask any questions. We totally understand. We were very upset that our dog had to endure the pain she did for so long. Not to mention surgery is a BIG deal and we wanted to do the very best thing for Pearl. So we researched day and night on the internet. Be sure that when you are reading things, that you focus on material that is from specialists in the field and not from some lay person giving their opinion. We had a difficult time finding information on the TTA surgery because it is a fairly new procedure in the United States, but has been performed with great success in Europe. The surgeon told us he also had been seeing the results with his TTA surgeries compariable to the results with those from Europe. The only difference was that our surgeon was a tad more conservative in the rehabilation process. I think in Europe they were releasing dogs to mild-moderate exercise at 8 weeks and our surgeon had us wait to 10 or 11 weeks. Pearl had to have an x-ray demostrating that the cut made in her bone had fused with the cage put in prior to being released. Pearl has since dropped weight now that her hypothryoidism is under control and she is healed. Weight does play a HUGE factor. I know many people worry about the other acl going out, but as long as you can keep your dog at a healthy weight the chances of that occuring are very slim. We are 14 months post Pearl's TTA surgery and she is doing GREAT! She was 5 y/o at the time of her TTA surgery.

Last edited by Amazonchix; 03-19-2010 at 09:25 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2010, 09:56 AM
 
3,593 posts, read 10,677,383 times
Reputation: 5207
Amazonchix...thank you thank you, THANK YOU! This is exactly what I was hoping to get from this thread

Mariah heads over to Galveston next Tuesday for an assessment with a canine ortho specialist. My girl is not fat but like most Chessies...she is one of those girls that just wouldn't look good in a bikini (as in - big boned and build like a tank).

She has had some lameness on and off for a few months. However she also has a very stoic nature. Since she hides pain so well, its hard to gage the seriousness an injury is on her. It wasn't until she came up 3-legged last week after some moderate exercise that I realized that something more than just a pulled muscle was going on.

Thanks again for telling me about your experience. I'm going to do some more research on the TTA procedure and discuss it at length with the vet. I'll let y'all now how it goes.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top