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Old 03-23-2010, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,596,970 times
Reputation: 4912

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
She does want to get one. We have been together nearly three years, so we are comfortable getting one together. She has actually been saying for over a year that we should get one. I always lived in apartments before and just bought a house, so now I finally have a place where I can have a dog. If it were up to her, we would have one already, I have been the one who has said we need to do the research to find out if we really have the time to take care of a dog before doing anything.
That's great to hear. I would definitely try to adopt from a shelter and would focus on any dog that is a pure or mix of anything other than working, herding and sporting. The latter are wonderful pets but do better in areas where they have access to nature and can get a lot of exercise or perform a particular task. These are usually the large breeds but can also include small breeds as well. For example, I wold stear clear of Jack Russells; the few that I have known have been very active and enjoy hunting, as that is what they have been bred to do (they were originally ratters).

Moreover, a lot of the smaller breeds need to be groomed as their hair grows like human hair and needs to be regularly cut. Medium and large breed dogs lose hair by shedding, the amount of which depends on the breed (my GSD sheds *copiously* twice a year, and small amounts daily), which will be something else to consider

I think that you will find just what you're looking for at a local shelter. Not to mention that you will also be saving a life Be sure to ask the shelter staff about temperament and history; they usually can tell you whether a particular dog will be well-suited for your home. As others have stated, regardless of breed, every dog's temperament will be different.

I also think that, if you can give it regular exercise (playing in the park, frequent walks), the suggestion to adopt a greyhound is something to consider; they are usually killed once their racing careers are over, and they have lovely dispositions:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greyhound
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Old 03-23-2010, 01:22 PM
 
5,065 posts, read 13,752,602 times
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ITA with the herding/sporting/working breeds, we've had two border collies that never lost their hyper behavior even as seniors. And I also like the Greyhound suggestion, I knew someone who had a Greyhound rescue. Beautiful, well-mannered dog, and she just needed a bit of exercise a few times a day.
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Old 03-23-2010, 01:36 PM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,425,436 times
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I have had more than a few people suggest greyhounds...that sounds like a very good option. Thanks for the tips on what to avoid (working/herding/sporting breeds). I am not considering anything other than adopting an adult dog from a shelter...I couldn't justify spending money on a breeder when so many dogs already need homes. It looks like I will have to stop by some shelters and start spending some time with some dogs
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Old 03-23-2010, 01:48 PM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,715,230 times
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you almost definitely won't find a greyhound in a shelter (maybe a greyhound mix), but there are tons of rescues that get retired racing greyhounds. they tend to be a bit pricier than your average municipal shelter; the shelter where i got sadie was $120 for an adult non-pit (puppies are more expensive, pits are less), local greyhound rescues are around $200-$300. but often rescues have more comprehensive vet care, the dogs have been evaluated in a home environment, and of course you're getting a purebred greyhound. often greyhound rescues actually have to pay for the dogs.

damn this thread, i was really obsessed with the idea of getting a greyhound a while ago and this has started me up again. sadie gets along really well with greyhounds, they chill her right out.

also i found this girl who would be ABSOLUTELY PERFECT:

Fuzzface Madness (Maddie) | Going Home Greyhounds Inc. (http://www.goinghomegreyhounds.org/node/392 - broken link)

and i mean come on, fuzzface madness??
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Old 03-23-2010, 01:55 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
556 posts, read 1,834,254 times
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Fuzzface Madness - too cool.........

If you are anywhere near Texas - Heart of Texas (H.O.T.) Greyhounds has some beautiful former racers......here's their site and available dogs....

HOT HOUNDS LOOKING FOR THEIR FOREVER HOMES!
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Old 03-23-2010, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Manhattan, Ks
1,280 posts, read 6,149,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by groar View Post
you almost definitely won't find a greyhound in a shelter (maybe a greyhound mix), but there are tons of rescues that get retired racing greyhounds. they tend to be a bit pricier than your average municipal shelter; the shelter where i got sadie was $120 for an adult non-pit (puppies are more expensive, pits are less), local greyhound rescues are around $200-$300. but often rescues have more comprehensive vet care, the dogs have been evaluated in a home environment, and of course you're getting a purebred greyhound. often greyhound rescues actually have to pay for the dogs.

damn this thread, i was really obsessed with the idea of getting a greyhound a while ago and this has started me up again. sadie gets along really well with greyhounds, they chill her right out.

also i found this girl who would be ABSOLUTELY PERFECT:

Fuzzface Madness (Maddie) | Going Home Greyhounds Inc. (http://www.goinghomegreyhounds.org/node/392 - broken link)

and i mean come on, fuzzface madness??
I think you need her.
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Old 03-23-2010, 07:02 PM
 
2,707 posts, read 5,370,890 times
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Should have read all the posts instead of the first several. I recommended a greyhound, too, so I'll delete the bulk of my post as it's just redundant.
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Old 03-24-2010, 08:47 AM
 
25,953 posts, read 26,767,982 times
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Defintely look for a fostered rescue dog because the foster will be able to tell you if the dog is suitable for your needs since it's been living in their house. I've had dog breeds that I would never, ever put in an apartment and will get one of the breed that I would for sure put in an apartment, so you can go by breed to a degree, but they often have suprising differences in personilties. I had a jack russell that destroyed my house top to bottom and turned 10 people away from adopting him and he is on a farm now where he belongs. However the very next week I got another JRT who was as calm and quiet as a pillow. Walked along next to me, stopped when I did. He was the complete opposite of the other one and I actuall adopted him out to an elderly retired couple - a place I would never have dreamed of putting a JRT before and would have easily approved apartment living for him. So, again, a foster can be a big benefit in helping you choose a rescue dog. If you want to find a specific breed from a rescue just type in petfinder in your computer and insert the info like breed, size, color or whatever you want and enter it and it will spit out photos of all the dogs in your area from rescues with info about them. If the dog turns out not to be suitable, fosters usually know the other dogs in their programs and can refer you someone who has one that could be a better match.

When I moved into my first house I did some research on dogs temperments and ended up getting a Shar-pei puppy because I read about them. They are relatively independant dogs and do well on their own without additional playpal dogs - almost obstinate. I was gardening a lot and she found places she liked to just lay on the ground and watch, but not too close. Other dogs would walk by but she wouldn't go crazy and bark. She was medium, not to big, not too small and she wasn't a big barker. I was used to being alone and not taking care of someone 24/7 so we were a really good match. They are playfull and enjoy play time together but mine tended to lose interest if another dog was playing too. I just typed in Shar-peis in the Petfinder site. I did go online before that and read about the dog breed in general and all of the medical issues the breed is prone to have so there would be no suprises. Peis have a well known skin condition that can be just horrible in some, but treatable. I was lucky, all I got was the snoring (and it's LOUD) because their noses are so small.

I also have another rescued 'mixed' shar-pei and this dog is absolutely wonderful. If I tell her to go out in the yard and bring the other dogs in she does it. I ask her something once and she does it and I spent no time training her to do anything. I do believe she is mixed with a working/herding breed. She was the main reason I started fostering and she is terrific with them.

It is also best not to consider the size to size ratio as the best option....meaning small dogs do not necessarily do well in small homes, apartments and condos. Small dogs have way more energy and their persistent, high pitched yap can be quite unnerving to either you or your neighbors. I swore I would never get a small dog until I adopted one of my fosters - well my own dog adopted him as her own. He was a little min-pin and ended up in a shelter because the girl who had him lived in an apartment and the neighbors complained about his yapping all day. He does much better here except when on squirrel patrol, but I'd never put that dog in a condo or apartment.

I also have a cocker spaniel who is very loyal and loving and quiet and they do well in large and small places and are also good travel buddies. The have a long life span. The only downside is that she has to be groomed on a regular basis by a professional groomer. I was lucky because I had worked as a groomer so I just do her here at home. They aren't real rambunctious or barkers - only heard a couple howls out of her chiming in with the others on occassion.

All of the dogs I've mentioned are rescue/fostered dogs so I knew what I was getting before I left with them.
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Old 03-24-2010, 10:12 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
9,355 posts, read 16,839,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kansas sky View Post
I think you need her.

i do too......
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Old 03-25-2010, 08:00 PM
 
5,641 posts, read 17,313,791 times
Reputation: 3979
What about just a medium sized mutt - whatever personality fits you best at your nearest shelter? They will make recommendations since they observe the dogs there.
The biggest mistake people make is to get too large of a dog. And they have trouble walking them, so even if they need exercise, they can't give it to the dog, because they cannot handle the dog.
Actually any dog is do-able IF you take it to obedience classes and teach the dog to be a good citizen. Beside the classes are fun and you meet lots of nice people.
Good luck!
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